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  1.  35
    The Electrodynamic 2-Body Problem and the Origin of Quantum Mechanics.C. K. Raju - 2004 - Foundations of Physics 34 (6):937-962.
    We numerically solve the functional differential equations (FDEs) of 2-particle electrodynamics, using the full electrodynamic force obtained from the retarded Lienard–Wiechert potentials and the Lorentz force law. In contrast, the usual formulation uses only the Coulomb force (scalar potential), reducing the electrodynamic 2-body problem to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The ODE formulation is mathematically suspect since FDEs and ODEs are known to be incompatible; however, the Coulomb approximation to the full electrodynamic force has been believed to be (...)
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  2.  35
    The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs.C. K. Raju - 2003 - Sage Publications.
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  3. Computers, Mathematics Education, and the Alternative Epistemology of the Calculus in the Yuktibhāṣā.C. K. Raju - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):325 - 362.
    Current formal mathematics, being divorced from the empirical, is entirely a social construct, so that mathematical theorems are no more secure than the cultural belief in two-valued logic, incorrectly regarded as universal. Computer technology, by enhancing the ability to calculate, has put pressure on this social construct, since proof-oriented formal mathematics is awkward for computation, while computational mathematics is regarded as epistemo-logically insecure. Historically, a similar epistemological fissure between computational/practical Indian mathematics and formal/spiritual Western mathematics persisted for centuries, during a (...)
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  4. Time Travel and the Reality of Spontaneity.C. K. Raju - 2005 - Foundations of Physics 36 (7):1099-1113.
    Contrary to the informed consensus, time travel implies spontaneity (as distinct from chance) so that time travel can only be of the second kind.
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  5. Computers, Mathematics Education, and the Alternative Epistemology of the Calculus in The.C. K. Raju - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):325-362.
    Current formal mathematics, being divorced from the empirical, is entirely a social construct, so that mathematical theorems are no more secure than the cultural belief in two-valued logic, incorrectly regarded as universal. Computer technology, by enhancing the ability to calculate, has put pressure on this social construct, since proof-oriented formal mathematics is awkward for computation, while computational mathematics is regarded as epistemo-logically insecure. Historically, a similar epistemological fissure between computational/practical Indian mathematics and formal/spiritual Western mathematics persisted for centuries, during a (...)
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  6.  3
    The Religious Roots of Mathematics.C. K. Raju - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (2-3):95-97.
  7. Mathematics And Culture.C. K. Raju - 1999 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 11.
  8.  24
    The Harmony Principle.C. K. Raju - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):586-604.
    I once wrote to Daya ji about what seemed to me a paradox in contemporary Indian philosophy. It is one thing that Indian philosophers in academia do not engage with science, or even with its history and philosophy. It is quite another thing that they do not engage with ethics. Ethics, after all, is at the core of philosophy. Without an ethical principle one often does not know how to respond to something fundamentally new, such as the bewildering variety of (...)
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  9.  5
    Time: What is It That It Can Be Measured?C. K. Raju - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (6):537-551.
    Experiments with the simple pendulum are easy, but its motion is nevertheless confounded with simple harmonic motion. However, refined theoretical models of the pendulum can, today, be easily taught using software like CALCODE. Similarly, the cycloidal pendulum is isochronous only in simplified theory. But what are theoretically equal intervals of time? Newton accepted Barrow’s even tenor hypothesis, but conceded that ‘equal motions’ did not exist – the refutability of Newtonian physics is independent of time measurement. However, time measurement was the (...)
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