28 found
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  1. Levinas and Political Theory.C. Fred Alford - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (2):146-171.
    How best to avoid the Levinas Effect, as it has been called, the tendency to make Emmanuel Levinas everything to everyone? One way is to demonstrate that Levinas's thinking does not fit into any of the categories by which we ordinarily approach political theory. If one were forced to categorize Levinas's political theory, the term "inverted liberalism " would come closest to the mark. As long, that is, as one emphasizes the term "inverted" over "liberalism." Levinas's defense of liberalism is (...)
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  2.  25
    Levinas, the Frankfurt School and Psychoanalysis.C. Fred Alford - 2002 - Wesleyan University Press.
    'Original and provocative . . . engagingly written. (C Fred Alford) counters Levinas's notorious obscurity with a goodly dose of transparency' - John Lechte, Macquarrie University Abstract and evocative, writing in what can only be ...
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  3.  33
    Is Jürgen Habermas's Reconstructive Science Really Science?C. Fred Alford - 1985 - Theory and Society 14 (3):321-340.
  4.  79
    Whistleblowers and the Narrative of Ethics.C. Fred Alford - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):402–418.
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  5. What Would It Matter If Everything Foucault Said About Prison Were Wrong? Discipline and Punish After Twenty Years.C. Fred Alford - 2000 - Theory and Society 29 (1):125-146.
  6.  15
    Narrative, Nature, and the Natural Law: From Aquinas to International Human Rights.C. Fred Alford - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Saint Thomas : putting nature into natural law -- Maritain and the love for the natural law -- The new natural law and evolutionary natural law -- International human rights, natural law, and Locke -- Conclusion : evil and the limits of the natural law.
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  7.  1
    After the Holocaust: The Book of Job, Primo Levi, and the Path to Affliction.C. Fred Alford - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Holocaust marks a decisive moment in modern suffering in which it becomes almost impossible to find meaning or redemption in the experience. In this study, C. Fred Alford offers a new and thoughtful examination of the experience of suffering. Moving from the Book of Job, an account of meaningful suffering in a God-drenched world, to the work of Primo Levi, who attempted to find meaning in the Holocaust through absolute clarity of insight, he concludes that neither strategy works well (...)
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  8. Think No Evil: Korean Values in the Age of Globalization.C. Fred Alford - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    In this investigation of the contemporary notion of evil, C. Fred Alford asks what we can learn about this concept, and about ourselves, by examining a society where it is unknown--where language contains no word that equates to the English term evil. Does such a society look upon human nature more benignly? Do its members view the world through rose-colored glasses? Korea offers a fascinating starting point, and Alford begins his search for answers there. In conversations with hundreds of Koreans (...)
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  9.  1
    The Self in Social Theory a Psychoanalytic Account of its Construction in Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rawls, and Rousseau.C. Fred Alford - 1991
    The self is a topic that crosses a great many disciplinary boundaries; concepts of the self are central to political science, psychoanalysis, philosophy, sociology, and classical studies. In this book, C.Fred Alford sets forth a psychoanalytic account of the self and applies it to texts by Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rawis, and Rouseau in order to draw out their implicit, often inchoate, assumptions about the self.
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  10.  39
    What Evil Means to Us.C. Fred Alford - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
    C. Fred Alford interviewed working people, prisoners, and college students in order to discover how people experience evil -- in themselves, in others, and in ...
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  11.  28
    Habermas, Post-Freudian Psychoanalysis, and the End of the Individual.C. Fred Alford - 1987 - Theory, Culture and Society 4 (1):3-29.
    For some time now a number of critics have argued that Juergen Habermas has misinterpreted Freud. The gist of this criticism is that Habermas' interpretation of psychoanalysis as `depth hermeneutics' must violate the intent of Freud's work, which is so deeply grounded in drive theory. In other words, Habermas confuses philosophical reflection with psychoanalysis. This paper takes a somewhat different focus. It examines the consequences of Habermas' interpretation of Freud for Habermas' view of the individual. It is shown that Habermas' (...)
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  12.  61
    Responsibility Without Freedom.C. Fred Alford - 1992 - Theory and Society 21 (2):157-181.
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  13.  53
    Hitler's Willing Executioners: What Does “Willing” Mean? [REVIEW]C. Fred Alford - 1997 - Theory and Society 26 (5):719-738.
  14. Science and the Revenge of Nature Marcuse & Habermas.C. Fred Alford - 1985
     
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  15. Whistle-Blower Narratives: The Experience of Choiceless Choice.C. Fred Alford - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):223-248.
    Most whistleblowers talk as if they never had a choice about whether to blow the whistle. This doesn't mean they acted suddenly, or impulsively, only that they believe they could not have done otherwise. Trying to make sense of this near universal answer to the question "Why did you do it?" the essay draws on narrative theory. Narrative theory distinguishes between actant and sender—that is, between actor and his or her values. This distinction helps to explain what it means to (...)
     
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  16.  80
    Emmanuel Levinas and Iris Murdoch: Ethics as Exit?C. Fred Alford - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):24-42.
  17.  37
    III. Yates on Feyerabend's Democratic Relativism.C. Fred Alford - 1985 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 28 (1-4):113 – 118.
    Stephen Yates's objections to Feyerabend's political theory (Inquiry 27 [1984], 137?42) are presented in a way that makes them unnecessarily vulnerable to a rhetorical strategy often employed by Feyerabend. Like many other critics, Yates seems to assume that it is the implausibility of Feyerabend's claims that opens them to refutation, whereas it is really this that makes them such slippery targets of criticism. Rather than claim that Feyerabend's ideal would be virtually impossible to realize, I argue that Feyerabend does not (...)
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  18.  82
    The Opposite of Totality: Levinas and the Frankfurt School. [REVIEW]C. Fred Alford - 2002 - Theory and Society 31 (2):229-254.
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  19.  83
    Jean Améry: Resentment as Ethic and Ontology. [REVIEW]C. Fred Alford - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):229-240.
    Against the view that trauma cripples the survivor’s ability to account for his or her own experience, Jean Améry, a survivor of Auschwitz, argued that trauma speaks a language of its own. In this language, what may be taken as a clinical symptom, the inability to let go of a traumatic past, is actually an ethical stance on behalf of history’s victims. Améry wrote about aging in similar terms. Aging and death are an assault on the values of life, an (...)
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  20.  64
    Freedom of the Encumbered Self: Michael Sandel and Iris Murdoch.C. Fred Alford - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):109.
    The debate over encumbered versus unencumbered selves that characterized the dialogue between liberalism and republicanism did not end well. Neither side seemed enlightened by its encounter with the other, as it became increasingly difficult to pin down the differences between the sides, never more so than when Michael Sandel was violently agreeing with Richard Dagger. Drawing on the work of novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch, this essay argues that Sandel could have made a much stronger argument for his view than (...)
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  21.  21
    Small Wonder: Global Power and Its Discontents. [REVIEW]C. Fred Alford - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (1):105-108.
  22.  30
    Reconciliation with Nature? The Frankfurt School, Postmodernism and Melanie Klein.C. Fred Alford - 1993 - Theory, Culture and Society 10 (2):207-227.
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  23. Psychology and the Natural Law of Reparation.C. Fred Alford - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are there universal values of right and wrong, good and bad, shared by virtually every human? The tradition of natural law argues that there is. Drawing on the work of psychoanalyst Melanie Klein, whose analyses have touched upon issues related to original sin, trespass, guilt, and salvation through reparation, in this 2006 book C. Fred Alford adds an extra dimension to this argument: we know natural law to be true because we have hated before we have loved and have wished (...)
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  24.  20
    A Note on the Institutional Context of Plato's "Protagoras".C. Fred Alford - 1988 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 81 (3):167.
  25.  26
    Women as Whistleblowers.C. Fred Alford - 2003 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 22 (1):67-76.
  26.  35
    Eros and Civilization After Thirty Years.C. Fred Alford - 1987 - Theory and Society 16 (6):869-890.
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  27.  3
    Narcissism: Socrates, the Frankfurt School, and Psychoanalytic Theory.C. Fred Alford - 1988
    The term narcissism is normally used to describe an infatuation with the self so extreme that the interests of others are ignored. However, argues C. Fred Alford, psychoanalytic theory also implies that narcissism can be construed in a positive way, as a striving for perfection wholeness, and control over self and world. In this book, Alford applies the psychoanalytic theory of narcissism to the philosophies of Socrates and Frankfurt School members Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, and Jurgen Habermas, contending (...)
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  28.  14
    Hans Albert and the Unfinished Enlightenment.C. Fred Alford - 1987 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (4):453-469.