Results for 'C. -S. You'

241 found
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  1. You've always been a plagiarist.C. Thompson - 1998 - Journal of Information Ethics 7 (1):49-53.
     
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  2. Why You Can’t Make a Computer that Feels Pain.Daniel C. Dennett - 1978 - Synthese 38 (3):415-449.
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  3. Now you see it, now you don't: Preventing consciousness with visual masking.Mark C. Price - 2001 - In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. pp. 25-60.
  4.  26
    Might You Not Have Been You?J. J. C. Smart - 2000 - Philosophy Now 30:17-17.
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  5. You only had to ask me once: Long-term retention requires direct queries during learning.Yasuaki Sakamoto & Bradley C. Love - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  6.  11
    If you build it, they will come: unintended future uses of organised health data collections.Kieran C. O’Doherty, Emily Christofides, Jeffery Yen, Heidi Beate Bentzen, Wylie Burke, Nina Hallowell, Barbara A. Koenig & Donald J. Willison - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):54.
    Health research increasingly relies on organized collections of health data and biological samples. There are many types of sample and data collections that are used for health research, though these are collected for many purposes, not all of which are health-related. These collections exist under different jurisdictional and regulatory arrangements and include: 1) Population biobanks, cohort studies, and genome databases 2) Clinical and public health data 3) Direct-to-consumer genetic testing 4) Social media 5) Fitness trackers, health apps, and biometric data (...)
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  7. You and She.C. J. F. Williams - 1991 - Analysis 51 (3):143 - 146.
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  8.  59
    You and I.C. L. Hamblin - 1972 - Analysis 33 (1):1 - 4.
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  9.  23
    You’re the New Ethics Officer, Now What?James C. Hyatt - 2006 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 20 (1):30-34.
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  10.  17
    You’re the New Ethics Officer, Now What?James C. Hyatt - 2006 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 20 (1):30-34.
  11.  45
    When you fail to see what you were told to look for: Inattentional blindness and task instructions.Anne M. Aimola Davies, Stephen Waterman, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):221-230.
    Inattentional blindness studies have shown that an unexpected object may go unnoticed if it does not share the property specified in the task instructions. Our aim was to demonstrate that observers develop an attentional set for a property not specified in the task instructions if it allows easier performance of the primary task. Three experiments were conducted using a dynamic selective-looking paradigm. Stimuli comprised four black squares and four white diamonds, so that shape and colour varied together. Task instructions specified (...)
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  12.  1
    Can you whistle while you work? Commentary on “how to blow the whistle and still have a career afterwards” (C.K. Gunsalus). [REVIEW]Howard Gadlin - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):65-69.
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  13. Would you mind being watched by machines? Privacy concerns in data mining.Vincent C. Müller - 2009 - AI and Society 23 (4):529-544.
    "Data mining is not an invasion of privacy because access to data is only by machines, not by people": this is the argument that is investigated here. The current importance of this problem is developed in a case study of data mining in the USA for counterterrorism and other surveillance purposes. After a clarification of the relevant nature of privacy, it is argued that access by machines cannot warrant the access to further information, since the analysis will have to be (...)
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  14.  4
    If They Summon You.Maia C. Young - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-2.
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  15.  5
    Do you hear what I hear? Perceived narrative constitutes a semantic dimension for music.J. Devin McAuley, Patrick C. M. Wong, Anusha Mamidipaka, Natalie Phillips & Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis - 2021 - Cognition 212 (C):104712.
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  16.  33
    “You have to teach the judge what to do”: Semiotic gaps between unrepresented litigants and the common law.Matthew W. L. Yeung & Janny H. C. Leung - 2017 - Semiotica 2017 (216):363-381.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2017 Heft: 216 Seiten: 363-381.
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  17.  12
    “Wait – You're a conservative?” Political diversity and the dilemma of disclosure.Jim A. C. Everett - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  18. You can't give orders to soldiers who don't exist.G. Bellafante & C. Gorman - 1993 - In Jonathan Westphal & Carl Avren Levenson (eds.), Time. Hackett Pub. Co.. pp. 142--19.
     
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  19.  24
    I love you with all my brain: laying aside the intellectually dull sword of biological determinism.James C. Woodson - 2012 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Background: By organizing and activating our passions with both hormones and experiences, the heart and mind of sexual behavior, sexual motivation, and sexual preference is the brain, the organ of learning. Despite decades of progress, this incontrovertible truth is somehow lost in the far-too-often biologically deterministic interpretation of genetic, hormonal, and anatomical scientific research into the biological origins of sexual motivation. Simplistic and polarized arguments are used in the media by both sides of the seemingly endless debate over sexual orientation, (...)
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  20.  44
    Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability.Susanne M. Reiterer, Xiaochen Hu, T. A. Sumathi & Nandini C. Singh - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  21.  17
    You Bet Your Life.Justin C. Fisher - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 74:45-49.
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  22.  15
    “God May Strike You Thisaway”: Flannery O’Connor and Simone Weil on Affliction and Joy.Ralph C. Wood - 2007 - Renascence 59 (3):179-193.
  23.  8
    You can't hide your lying eyes.W. C. McGrew - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):258-258.
  24. I win-you lose-the development of argumentational reasoning.Nl Stein & C. Miller - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):496-496.
     
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  25.  14
    What You Know, What You Do, and How You Feel: Cultural Competence, Cultural Consonance, and Psychological Distress.William W. Dressler, Mauro C. Balieiro & José E. dos Santos - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  26.  8
    Why You Should Report Bayes Factors in Your Transcranial Brain Stimulation Studies.Anna Lena Biel & Elisabeth V. C. Friedrich - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  27. Brecher, B.-Getting What You Want.C. Bertram - 1999 - Philosophical Books 40:196-197.
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  28. Be careful what you say! – Evaluative change based on instructional learning generalizes to other similar stimuli and to the wider category.Camilla C. Luck, Rachel R. Patterson & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2021 - Cognition and Emotion 35 (1):169-184.
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  29.  2
    Whose side are you on? Complexities arising from the non-combatant status of military medical personnel.Michael C. Reade - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):67-86.
    Since the mid-1800s, clergy, doctors, other clinicians, and military personnel who specifically facilitate their work have been designated “non-combatants”, protected from being targeted in return for providing care on the basis of clinical need alone. While permitted to use weapons to protect themselves and their patients, they may not attempt to gain military advantage over an adversary. The rationale for these regulations is based on sound arguments aimed both at reducing human suffering, but also the ultimate advantage of the nation-state (...)
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  30. Let me tell you ‘bout the birds and the bee-mimicking flies and Bambiraptor.Joyce C. Havstad - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):25.
    Scientists have been arguing for more than 25 years about whether it is a good idea to collect voucher specimens from particularly vulnerable biological populations. Some think that, obviously, scientists should not be harvesting organisms from, for instance, critically endangered species. Others think that, obviously, it is the special job of scientists to collect precisely such information before any chance of retrieving it is forever lost. The character, extent, longevity, and span of the ongoing disagreement indicates that this is likely (...)
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  31.  14
    When feeling bad makes you look good: Guilt, shame, and person perception.Deborah C. Stearns & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):407-430.
  32.  1
    “You Never Get a Second Chance”: First Impressions of Physicians Depend on Their Body Posture and Gender.Felix C. Grün, Maren Heibges, Viola Westfal & Markus A. Feufel - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    A first impression matters, in particular when encounters are brief as in most doctor-patient interactions. In this study, we investigate how physicians’ body postures impact patients’ first impressions of them and extend previous research by exploring posture effects on the perception of all roles of a physician – not just single aspects such as scholarly expertise or empathy. In an online survey, 167 participants ranked photographs of 4 physicians in 4 postures. The results show that male physicians were rated more (...)
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  33.  33
    What do you know when you know your own thoughts?Sanford C. Goldberg - 2003 - In Susana Nuccetelli (ed.), New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
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  34.  10
    Be careful what you say! – Evaluative change based on instructional learning generalizes to other similar stimuli and to the wider category.Camilla C. Luck, Rachel R. Patterson & Ottmar V. Lipp - forthcoming - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion:1-16.
  35.  26
    If you speak slowly, do people read your prose slowly? Person-particular speech recoding during reading.Stephen M. Kosslyn & Ann M. C. Matt - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (4):250-252.
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  36.  15
    "Why aren't you doing what we want?" Cultivating collegiality and communication between specialist and generalist physicians and residents.C. A. Rentmeester - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):308-310.
    Developing residents’ communication skills has been a goal of residency training programmes since the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education codified it as a core competency. In this article, a case that features problematic communication between a generalist and specialist physician is drawn upon, and it is suggested how their communication might become open and effective through a practice of reason exchange. This is a practice of giving reasons, listening to reasons given by others, evaluating reasons and deciding which particulars (...)
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  37.  24
    Is what you feel what you don't know?Simon C. Moore & Mike Oaksford - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):211-212.
    Rolls defines emotion as innate reward and punishment. This could not explain our results showing that people learn faster in a negative mood. We argue that what people know about their world affects their emotional state. Negative emotion signals a failure to predict negative reward and hence prompts learning to resolve the ignorance. Thus what you don't know affects how you feel.
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  38.  7
    Counting the Days, Not Living Them: You Will Die at Twenty, Directed by Amjad Abu Alala, 2019.Robert C. Abrams - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):503-504.
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  39.  40
    Will the Real You Please Stand Up. [REVIEW]Joseph C. Kunkel - 1986 - Teaching Philosophy 9 (2):180-181.
  40. Starting from Experience, and Knowing When You Do.Robert C. Scharff - 2023 - In Eric R. Severson & Kevin C. Krycka (eds.), The Psychology and Philosophy of Eugene Gendlin: Making Sense of Contemporary Experience. Routledge.
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  41.  46
    What Do You Really Want From Žižek?: On Slavoj Žižek, The Sublime Object of Ideology.Oliver C. Speck - 1998 - Film-Philosophy 2 (1).
  42. Racism in the Post-Civil Rights Era: Now You See It, Now You Don't.Robert C. Smith - 1997 - Science and Society 61 (3):420-422.
     
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  43.  10
    Did You Know?R. De Vries & B. C. Martinson - 2007 - Academic Medicine 82 (9).
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  44.  15
    Would you fund this movie? A reply to Fox et al.Timothy D. Wilson, Daniel T. Gilbert, David A. Reinhard, Erin C. Westgate & Casey L. Brown - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  45.  1
    Are you ready for retirement? The influence of values on membership in voluntary organizations in midlife and old age.Julia Sánchez-García, Andrea Vega-Tinoco, Ana I. Gil-Lacruz, Diana C. Mira-Tamayo, Miguel Moya & Marta Gil-Lacruz - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Membership in voluntary organizations is associated with individual and social benefits. Due to the negative consequences of the global pandemic on older people, and the governmental challenges posed by population aging, voluntary membership is of great importance to society. To effectively promote volunteering among older people, it is necessary to understand the determinants of voluntary membership. This study analyses the influence of individual values—secular/traditional and survival/self-expression–on voluntary membership among European adults. Specifically, it examines which values orient two age groups, as (...)
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  46.  12
    How could you tell how grammars are represented?John C. Marshall - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):411-412.
  47.  14
    On a clear day you can see behavior.Robert C. Bolles - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):619-620.
  48.  2
    Because you had a bad day: the role of negative affect and justification in self-control failure.Ally M. Heiland & Jennifer C. Veilleux - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (5):912-927.
    Justification thinking (using excuses to “allow” giving into temptation) has been identified as a potential link between negative affect and self-control failure. We hypothesised that negative affect would prompt greater justification thinking, specifically deservingness thinking (i.e. “I deserve a treat”), and tested this for both inhibitory (temptation is to approach reward; self-control is to inhibit) and initiatory (temptation is to refrain from action, self-control is to initiate action) hypothetical self-control dilemmas. We found that only for inhibitory self-control (Study 1; N (...)
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  49.  13
    Mutagenesis: Everything you wanted to know, nearly. Directed mutagenesis: A practical approach (1991). Edited by M. J. McPherson, IRL Press, Oxford. xx+257pp. £19.50 paperback, £30 spiral. ISBN 0‐19‐963140‐9 paperback, 0‐19‐963141‐7 spiral. [REVIEW]Daniel C. Emery - 1993 - Bioessays 15 (4):291-291.
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  50.  13
    The countries marvelled at you” King Solomon in Ben sira 47: 12–22.Pancratius C. Beentjes - 1984 - Bijdragen 45 (1):6-14.
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