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  1.  53
    Informed Consent Revisited: Japan and the U.S.Akira Akabayashi & Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):9 – 14.
    Informed consent, decision-making styles and the role of patient-physician relationships are imperative aspects of clinical medicine worldwide. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman afflicted with advanced liver cancer whose attending physician, per request of the family, did not inform her of her true diagnosis. In our analysis, we explore the differences in informed-consent styles between patients who hold an "independent" and "interdependent" construal of the self and then highlight the possible implications maintained by this position in the context (...)
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  2.  38
    Is Asian Bioethics Really the Solution?Akira Akabayashi, Satoshi Kodama & Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):270-272.
    Today Asia is attracting attention in the area of bioethics. In fact, the potential of bioethics is beginning to be discussed seriously at academic centers across Asia. In Japan, this discussion began a decade ago with the publication The book is one of the principal explorations of biomedical ethics involving Japan to date. Tom Beauchamp, an author of one of the book's chapters, compares Japanese and American standards of informed consent and refutes relativistic positions, concluding that.
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  3.  46
    Perspectives on Advance Directives in Japanese Society: A Population-Based Questionnaire Survey.Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Ichiro Kai - 2003 - BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):5.
    BackgroundIn Japan, discussion concerning advance directives has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan.MethodA self-administered questionnaire was sent via mail to a (...)
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  4.  44
    Scientific Misconduct in Japan: The Present Paucity of Oversight Policy.Brian Taylor Slingsby, Satoshi Kodama & Akira Akabayashi - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (3):294-297.
    Scientific misconduct can jeopardize scientific progress and destroy the credibility and reputation of academic institutions and their faculty and students; ultimately it can compromise scientific integrity and result in a loss of confidence for the entire scientific community. Only recently in Japan has scientific misconduct become a central public topic. This increased attention to the topic, in turn, has highlighted a paucity of ethical standards within the Japanese scientific community and a lack of an apt process for conflict resolution. In (...)
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  5.  38
    Conflict of Interest: A Japanese Perspective.Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Yoshiyuki Takimoto - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (3):277-280.
    Until recently, many of Japan's medical and bioethical communities had ignored the issue of conflicts of interest . This is no longer the case. Discussion on the economic and ethical problems defined by CIs is now apparent in academic, political, and even industrial spheres. In June 2004, this debate was sparked by a scandal involving AnGes MG, Inc., a bioventure company set up by a faculty member at Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine. AnGes MG developed a gene therapy using (...)
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  6.  12
    The Nature of Relative Subjectivity: A Reflexive Mode of Thought.Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):9 – 25.
    Ethical principles including autonomy, justice and equality function in the same paradigm of thought, that is, logocentrism - an epistemological predilection that relies on the analytic power of deciphering between binary oppositions. By studying observable behavior with an analytical approach, however, one immediately limits any recognition and possible understanding of modes of thought based on separate epistemologies. This article seeks to reveal an epistemological predilection that diverges from logocentrism yet continues to function as a fundamental component of ethical behavior. The (...)
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  7.  28
    Transplant Tourism From Japan.Misao Fujita, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Akira Akabayashi - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):24-26.
  8.  29
    Professional Approaches to Stroke Treatment in Japan: A Relationship‐Centred Model.Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (2):218-226.
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  9. The Editors Wish to Express Their Appreciation to the Following Individuals Who, Though Not Members of the Advisory Board, Generously Reviewed Manuscripts for The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy During 2005: Holly Anderson, Nicholas Capaldi, Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, John R. Graham, Albert.John R. Klune Jonsen, Marta Kolthopp, Gilbert Meilander Lawry, Jonathan Moreno, David Resnik, Brian Taylor Slingsby & J. Robert Thompson - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (323).
     
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  10.  31
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Informed Consent Revisited: Japan and the US”.Akira Akabayashi & Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):W27-W28.
    Informed consent, decision-making styles and the role of patient–physician relationships are imperative aspects of clinical medicine worldwide. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman afflicted with advanced liver cancer whose attending physician, per request of the family, did not inform her of her true diagnosis. In our analysis, we explore the differences in informed-consent styles between patients who hold an “independent” and “interdependent” construal of the self and then highlight the possible implications maintained by this position in the context (...)
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