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  1.  36
    What We Do When We Resuscitate Extremely Preterm Infants.Jeremy R. Garrett, Brian S. Carter & John D. Lantos - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (8):1-3.
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  2.  9
    My Story is Traumatic, You Probably Would Not Understand.Brian S. Carter - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (5):58-60.
    The healthcare ethics consultant holds a widely described role in the modern American hospital. S/he may practice within a clinical discipline and be trained in bioethics, or be a trained phi...
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  3.  9
    Postponed Withholding Does Not Postpone Attachment.Brian S. Carter - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (11):27-30.
    Counseling parents on the cusp of delivering an extremely preterm infant is performed thousands of times every year in North America, Europe, Japan and in centers situated in other countries around...
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  4.  15
    Tutorials, Taxonomies, and Troubles With Miracle Language in Pediatric Medicine.Brian S. Carter - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):54-55.
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  5.  8
    "Decision making in the NICU--strategies, statistics, and" satisficing".Brian S. Carter & Steven R. Leuthner - 2001 - Bioethics Forum 18 (3-4):7-15.
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  6.  20
    Ethics Consultations in a Fetal Health Center.Brian S. Carter & Shika Kalevor - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (4):78-80.
    Fetal medicine is an emerging field that raises unique ethical concerns. Our children’s hospital started a Fetal Health Center 10 years ago. In this specialized setting, a multidisciplinary t...
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  7.  9
    The Natal Journey and Perinatal Palliative Care.Brian S. Carter - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (3):549-552.
    Pope Francis beautifully describes how the perinatal journey starts in mystery. Doctors may forget this. We focus on the science that may partially explain how conception and implantation occur, how the placenta functions, and the gradual development of embryo and fetus. But science cannot address that meta-physical—or spiritual—reality. The question of “why?” is never too far away from the minds of expectant parents. Why now? Why me? Why did my baby develop these terrible problems? Why is my life being challenged (...)
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  8.  10
    What information do parents facing extremely preterm birth really need?: A bioethicist’s perspective.Brian S. Carter - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 34 (1):99-103.
    ArgumentsPhysicians who counsel expectant parents about the needs for resuscitation and intensive care for an extremely preterm infant must be able to address many clinical facts and be prepared to face several ethical considerations. Such counseling is generally more than an acquisition of informed consent. It must be guided by ethical principles, values held dear by parents, relational priorities and directed toward an informed and shared decision-making process. Parents may come with a need for clinical facts, a desire that they (...)
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  9.  45
    Response to “Giving 'Moral Distress' a Voice: Ethical Concerns Among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Personnel” by Pam Hefferman and Steve Heilig and “Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology” by Jonathan Muraskas et al. [REVIEW]Anita J. Catlin & Brian S. Carter - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (3):400-403.
    The Spring 1999 issue of CambridgeQuarterly adds to the growing body of academic inquiry into the goals of neonatal intensive care practices. Muraskas and colleagues thoughtfully presented the possibility of nontreatment for neonates born at or under 24 weeks gestation. Jain, Thomasma, and Ragas explained that quality of future life must not be ignored in clinical deliberation. And Hefferman and Heilig described once again the dilemmas nurses face when caring for potentially devastated neonates kept alive by technology. These authors take (...)
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