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Brian P. McLaughlin [92]Brian McLaughlin [19]Brianp Mclaughlin [1]Brian Paul Mclaughlin [1]
  1. .Ernest LePore & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.) - 1985 - Blackwell.
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  2. The rise and fall of british emergentism.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.
     
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  3.  31
    The Rise and Fall of British Emergentism.Brian P. Mclaughlin - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, H. Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Essays on the Prospects of Nonreductive Physicalism. W. De Gruyter. pp. 49-93.
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  4. Distinctions Without a Difference.Vann McGee & Brian McLaughlin - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):203-251.
  5. Supervenience.Karen Bennett & Brian McLaughlin - 2005 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  6. Connectionism and the problem of systematicity: Why Smolensky's solution doesn't work.Jerry Fodor & Brian P. McLaughlin - 1990 - Cognition 35 (2):183-205.
  7.  76
    Actions and events: perspectives on the philosophy of Donald Davidson.Ernest LePore & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.) - 1985 - New York, NY, USA: Blackwell.
  8. Varieties of Supervenience.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1994
     
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  9. Varieties of supervenience.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1995 - In Elias E. Savellos & U. Yalcin (eds.), Supervenience: New Essays. Cambridge University Press. pp. 16--59.
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  10. Perspectives on Self-Deception.Brian P. McLaughlin & Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.) - 1988 - University of California Press.
    00 Students of philosophy, psychology, sociology, and literature will welcome this collection of original essays on self-deception and related phenomena such as ...
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  11.  55
    Supervenience.Brian McLaughlin - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Type epiphenomenalism, type dualism, and the causal priority of the physical.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1989 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:109-135.
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  13. Color, consciousness, and color consciousness.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2003 - In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 97-154.
     
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  14.  75
    Varieties of supervenience.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1994 - In Elias E. Savellos & Ümit D. Yalçin (eds.), Savellos, E.; Yalchin, O. (Eds.) Supervenience. Cambridge University Press. pp. 16--59.
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  15. The Lessons of the Many.Vann McGee & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28 (1):129-151.
  16. The place of color in nature.Brian McLaughlin - 2003 - In Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.), Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. Oxford University Press. pp. 475--502.
     
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  17.  73
    The Skewed View from Here: Normal Geometrical Misperception.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2016 - Philosophical Topics 44 (2):231-299.
    The paper offers a partial, broad-stroke sketch of visual perception, and argues that certain kinds of normal visual misperceptions are systematic and widespread.
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  18. Mental causation and Shoemaker-realization.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - Erkenntnis 67 (2):149 - 172.
    Sydney Shoemaker has proposed a new definition of `realization’ and used it to try to explain how mental events can be causes within the framework of a non-reductive physicalism. I argue that it is not actually his notion of realization that is doing the work in his account of mental causation, but rather the assumption that certain physical properties entail mental properties that do not entail them. I also point out how his account relies on certain other controversial assumptions, including (...)
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  19. In defense of new wave materialism: A response to Horgan and Tienson.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2001 - In Carl Gillett & Barry M. Loewer (eds.), Physicalism and its Discontents. Cambridge University Press.
  20. On the Matter of Robot Minds.Brian P. McLaughlin & David Rose - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy.
    The view that phenomenally conscious robots are on the horizon often rests on a certain philosophical view about consciousness, one we call “nomological behaviorism.” The view entails that, as a matter of nomological necessity, if a robot had exactly the same patterns of dispositions to peripheral behavior as a phenomenally conscious being, then the robot would be phenomenally conscious; indeed it would have all and only the states of phenomenal consciousness that the phenomenally conscious being in question has. We experimentally (...)
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  21. Externalism, twin earth, and self-knowledge.Brian P. McLaughlin & Michael Tye - 1998 - In C. Macdonald, Peter K. Smith & C. Wright (eds.), Knowing Our Own Minds: Essays in Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 285--320.
  22.  66
    Dretske and his critics.Brian P. McLaughlin (ed.) - 1991 - Cambridge, Mass., USA: Blackwell.
    Frederick Dretske′s views on the nature of seeing, the possibility of knowledge, the nature of content or non-natural meaning, the nature of behavior, and the role of content in teh causal explanation of behavior have been profoundly important. Dretske and His Critics contains original discussions of these issues by Joh Heil, Stuart Cohen, David H Sanford, Jaegwon Kim, Fred Adams, Daniel Dennett, Robert Cummins, Terence Horgan and Brian McLaughlin. Each chapter is responded to by Dretske himslef.
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  23. True colours.Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2006 - Analysis 66 (4):335-340.
    (Tye 2006) presents us with the following scenario: John and Jane are both stan- dard human visual perceivers (according to the Ishihara test or the Farnsworth test, for example) viewing the same surface of Munsell chip 527 in standard conditions of visual observation. The surface of the chip looks “true blue” to John (i.e., it looks blue not tinged with any other colour to John), and blue tinged with green to Jane.1 Tye then in effect poses a multiple choice question.
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  24. Is content-externalism compatible with privileged access?Brian P. McLaughlin & Michael Tye - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):349-380.
  25. Is role-functionalism committed to epiphenomenalism?Brian P. McLaughlin - 2006 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (1-2):39-66.
    Role-functionalism for mental events attempts to avoid epiphenomenalism without psychophysical identities. The paper addresses the question of whether it can succeed. It is argued that there is considerable reason to believe it cannot avoid epiphenomenalism, and that if it cannot, then it is untenable. It is pointed out, however, that even if role- functionalism is indeed an untenable theory of mental events, a role-functionalism account of mental dispositions has some intuitive plausibility.
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  26. Actions and Events, Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson.Ernest Lepore & Brian P. Mclaughlin - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (4):542-544.
     
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  27. Supervenience, vagueness, and determination.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1997 - Philosophical Perspectives 11:209-30.
    The paper is divided into two parts, each with subsections. In the first part, I shall discuss some matters that have been extensively examined by Kim, namely what the basic types of supervenience are and how they are pairwise logically related; in the course of this discussion, I shall distinguish a weak from a strong notion of global supervenience. In the second part, I shall examine supervenience in a context in which Kim has not: I shall attempt to solve a (...)
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  28. Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind.Brian P. McLaughlin & Jonathan Cohen (eds.) - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind showcases the leading contributors to the field, debating the major questions in philosophy of mind today. Comprises 20 newly commissioned essays on hotly debated issues in the philosophy of mind Written by a cast of leading experts in their fields, essays take opposing views on 10 central contemporary debates A thorough introduction provides a comprehensive background to the issues explored Organized into three sections which explore the ontology of the mental, nature of the mental (...)
  29.  47
    Metaphysics and Cognitive Science.Alvin I. Goldman & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.) - 2019 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    This volume illustrates how the methodology of metaphysics can be enriched with the help of cognitive science. Few philosophers nowadays would dispute the relevance of cognitive science to the metaphysics of mind, but this volume mainly concerns the relevance of metaphysics to phenomena that are not themselves mental. The volume is thus a departure from standard analytical metaphysics. Among the issues to which results from cognitive science are brought to bear are the metaphysics of time, of morality, of meaning, of (...)
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  30. The connectionism/classicism battle to win souls.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1993 - Philosophical Studies 71 (2):163-190.
  31. Logical commitment and semantic indeterminacy: A reply to Williamson.Vann Mcgee & Brian P. Mclaughlin - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (1):123-136.
  32.  74
    McKinsey's challenge, warrant transmission, and skepticism.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2003 - In Susana Nuccetelli (ed.), New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
  33.  53
    Type materialism for phenomenal consciousness.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 431--444.
  34. Mental Causation.Brian McLaughlin - 2006 - In D. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Macmillan Reference. pp. 2.
  35.  69
    2. Exploring the Possibility of Self-Deception in Belief.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1988 - In Brian P. McLaughlin & Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.), Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press. pp. 29-62.
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  36.  17
    Is Content-Externalism Compatible with Privileged Access?Brian P. McLaughlin & Michael Tye - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):349-380.
  37. On Davidson's response to the charge of epiphenomenalism.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1992 - In John Heil & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), Mental Causation. Oxford University Press.
    [Why Davidson's Anomalous Monism Would Lead to Type Epiphenomenalism]: 1. According to Davidson, events can cause other events only in virtue of falling under physical types cited in strict laws; 2. But no mental event-type is a physical event-type cited in a strict law, since the mental is anomalous. 3. Therefore, under Davidson's theory, type epiphenomenalism is true.
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  38. Systematicity redux.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2009 - Synthese 170 (2):251-274.
    One of the main challenges that Jerry Fodor and Zenon Pylyshyn (Cognition 28:3–71, 1988) posed for any connectionist theory of cognitive architecture is to explain the systematicity of thought without implementing a Language of Thought (LOT) architecture. The systematicity challenge presents a dilemma: if connectionism cannot explain the systematicity of thought, then it fails to offer an adequate theory of cognitive architecture; and if it explains the systematicity of thought by implementing a LOT architecture, then it fails to offer an (...)
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  39.  15
    Is Content-Externalism Compatible with Privileged Access?Brian P. McLaughlin & Michael Tye - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):349-380.
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  40. Consciousness, type physicalism, and inference to the best explanation.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2010 - Philosophical Issues 20 (1):266-304.
  41.  17
    Goldman and his Critics.Hilary Kornblith & Brian McLaughlin (eds.) - 2016 - Malden, MA: Blackwell.
    Goldman and His Critics presents a series of original essays contributed by influential philosophers who critically examine Alvin Goldman’s work, followed by Goldman’s responses to each essay. Critiques Alvin Goldman’s groundbreaking theories, writings, and ideas on a range of philosophical topics Features contributions from some of the most important and influential contemporary philosophers Covers Goldman’s views on epistemology—both individual and social—in addition to cognitive science and metaphysics Pays special attention to Goldman’s writings on philosophy of mind, including the evolution of (...)
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  42.  27
    Supervenience, Vagueness, and Determination.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1997 - Noûs 31 (S11):209-230.
    The paper is divided into two parts, each with subsections. In the first part, I shall discuss some matters that have been extensively examined by Kim, namely what the basic types of supervenience are and how they are pairwise logically related; in the course of this discussion, I shall distinguish a weak from a strong notion of global supervenience. In the second part, I shall examine supervenience in a context in which Kim has not: I shall attempt to solve a (...)
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  43.  15
    Perspectives on Self-Deception.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty & Brian P. McLaughlin - 1988 - University of California Press. Edited by Brian P. McLaughlin & Amélie Oksenberg Rorty.
    Students of philosophy, psychology, sociology, and literature will welcome this collection of original essays on self-deception and related phenomena such as wishful thinking, bad faith, and false consciousness. The book has six sections, each exploring self-deception and related phenomena from a different perspective.
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  44. A naturalist-phenomenal realist response to Block's harder problem.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2003 - Philosophical Issues 13 (1):163-204.
    widely held commitments: to phenomenal realism and to naturalism. Phenomenal realism is the view that we are phenomenally consciousness, and that there is no a priori or armchair sufficient condition for phenomenal consciousness that can be stated in nonphenomenal terms . 1,2 Block points out that while phenomenal realists reject.
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  45. On the limits of A Priori physicalism.Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - In Brian P. McLaughlin & Jonathan D. Cohen (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
  46.  97
    Perception, causation, and supervenience.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1984 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):569-592.
    While a necessary condition for perceiving a physical object is that the object cause the perceiver to undergo a sense experience, this condition is not sufficient. causal theorists attempt to provide a sufficient condition by placing constraints on the way the object causes the perceiver's experience. i argue that this is not possible since the relationship between a perceiver's experience and an object in virtue of which the perceiver perceives the object does not supervene on any of the ways in (...)
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  47.  71
    Systematicity, conceptual truth, and evolution.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1992 - Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences 34:217-234.
    Smolensky's (1995) proposal for a connectionist explanation of systematicity doesn't work.
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  48. The truth about 'the truth about true blue'.Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):162–166.
    It can happen that a single surface S, viewed in normal conditions, looks pure blue (“true blue”) to observer John but looks blue tinged with green to a second observer, Jane, even though both are normal in the sense that they pass the standard psychophysical tests for color vision. Tye (2006a) finds this situation prima facie puzzling, and then offers two different “solutions” to the puzzle.1 The first is that at least one observer misrepresents S’s color because, though normal in (...)
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  49. Introduction.Tim Crane & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2009 - Synthese 170 (2):211-15.
    Jerry Fodor, by common agreement, is one of the world’s leading philosophers. At the forefront of the cognitive revolution since the 1960s, his work has determined much of the research agenda in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of psychology for well over 40 years. This special issue dedicated to his work is intended both as a tribute to Fodor and as a contribution to the fruitful debates that his work has generated. One philosophical thesis that has dominated Fodor’s (...)
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  50.  59
    On punctate content and on conceptual role.Brian P. Mclaughlin - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):653-660.
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