Results for 'Brett T. Litz'

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  1.  31
    Emotional priming of autobiographical memory in post-traumatic stress disorder.Richard J. McNally, Brett T. Litz, Adrienne Prassas, Lisa M. Shin & Frank W. Weathers - 1994 - Cognition and Emotion 8 (4):351-367.
  2.  7
    Defending Democracy against Its "Cultured Despisers".Brett T. Wilmot - 2006 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 26 (1):37-59.
    J. JUDD OWEN AND JEFFREY STOUT SUGGEST THE NEED TO RETHINK OUR understanding of the normative commitments of liberal democracy in response to recent challenges from its "cultured despisers". In this essay I argue that Owen and Stout fail to redeem liberal democracy against these critics because they reject the possibility of constitutional neutrality with respect to an indeterminate plurality of religions. As a result, a religious test on citizenship is inevitable under any democratic constitution expressed in their terms, and (...)
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  3.  8
    Looking beyond the Individualism & Homo Economicus of Neoclassical Economics. [REVIEW]Brett T. Wilmot - 2012 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (1):205-208.
  4.  36
    Persea americana (avocado): bringing ancient flowers to fruit in the genomics era.André S. Chanderbali, Victor A. Albert, Vanessa E. T. M. Ashworth, Michael T. Clegg, Richard E. Litz, Douglas E. Soltis & Pamela S. Soltis - 2008 - Bioessays 30 (4):386-396.
    The avocado (Persea americana) is a major crop commodity worldwide. Moreover, avocado, a paleopolyploid, is an evolutionary “outpost” among flowering plants, representing a basal lineage (the magnoliid clade) near the origin of the flowering plants themselves. Following centuries of selective breeding, avocado germplasm has been characterized at the level of microsatellite and RFLP markers. Nonetheless, little is known beyond these general diversity estimates, and much work remains to be done to develop avocado as a major subtropical‐zone crop. Among the goals (...)
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  5.  37
    Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport.T. Rachel Park, Emmanuel Macedo, Brett A. Diaz & Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (1):153-157.
    In Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport, Kathryn E. Henne provides ‘a genealogical account of anti-doping regulation by questioning the meanings we take from sport’ (...
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  6. Why how and why aren’t enough: more problems with Mayr’s proximate-ultimate distinction.Brett Calcott - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):767-780.
    Like Laland et al., I think Mayr’s distinction is problematic, but I identify a further problem with it. I argue that Mayr’s distinction is a false dichotomy, and obscures an important question about evolutionary change. I show how this question, once revealed, sheds light on some debates in evo-devo that Laland et al.’s analysis cannot, and suggest that it provides a different view about how future integration between biological disciplines might proceed.
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  7. Can't get you out of my head : consuming celebrity, producing sexual identity.Brett Farmer - 2008 - In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8. Gonzo Strategies of Deceit: An Interview with Joaquin Segura.Brett W. Schultz - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):117-124.
    Joaquin Segura. Untitled (fig. 40) . 2007 continent. 1.2 (2011): 117-124. The interview that follows is a dialogue between artist and gallerist with the intent of unearthing the artist’s working strategies for a general public. Joaquin Segura is at once an anomaly in Mexico’s contemporary art scene at the same time as he is one of the most emblematic representatives of a larger shift toward a post-national identity among its youngest generation of artists. If Mexico looks increasingly like a foreclosed (...)
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  9.  44
    Signals That Make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Arnaud Pocheville & Paul Griffiths - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (1):233-258.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks—from the way monkeys in a troop communicate to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this article, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and his formal measure (...)
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  10.  6
    Why Ender Can't Go Home.Brett Chandler Patterson - 2013-08-26 - In Kevin S. Decker (ed.), Ender's Game and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 112–123.
    Toward the end of Ender's Game, after the manipulations of the Battle School officials stand exposed, Ender Wiggin must face the terrible consequences of what has really been going on during the last simulation. In the spirit of diplomacy, political leaders decide that Ender will not return home, since his presence on Earth could spark a war. Instead, he will be part of the pioneering groups launched out into space to explore and to establish settlements on the “bugger worlds.” We (...)
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  11. Pragmatic accounts of justification, epistemic analyticity, and other routes to easy knowledge of abstracta.Brett Topey - forthcoming - In Xavier de Donato-Rodríguez, José Falguera & Concha Martínez-Vidal (eds.), Deflationist Conceptions of Abstract Objects. Springer.
    One common attitude toward abstract objects is a kind of platonism: a view on which those objects are mind-independent and causally inert. But there's an epistemological problem here: given any naturalistically respectable understanding of how our minds work, we can't be in any sort of contact with mind-independent, causally inert objects. So platonists, in order to avoid skepticism, tend to endorse epistemological theories on which knowledge is easy, in the sense that it requires no such contact—appeals to Boghossian’s notion of (...)
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  12. Saving Sensitivity.Brett Topey - 2022 - Philosophical Quarterly 72 (1):177-196.
    Sensitivity has sometimes been thought to be a highly epistemologically significant property, serving as a proxy for a kind of responsiveness to the facts that ensure that the truth of our beliefs isn’t just a lucky coincidence. But it's an imperfect proxy: there are various well-known cases in which sensitivity-based anti-luck conditions return the wrong verdicts. And as a result of these failures, contemporary theorists often dismiss such conditions out of hand. I show here, though, that a sensitivity-based understanding of (...)
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  13. Linguistic convention and worldly fact: Prospects for a naturalist theory of the a priori.Brett Topey - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (7):1725-1752.
    Truth by convention, once thought to be the foundation of a uniquely promising approach to explaining our access to the truth in nonempirical domains, is nowadays widely considered an absurdity. Its fall from grace has been due largely to the influence of an argument that can be sketched as follows: our linguistic conventions have the power to make it the case that a sentence expresses a particular proposition, but they can’t by themselves generate truth; whether a given proposition is true—and (...)
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  14. Realism, reliability, and epistemic possibility: on modally interpreting the Benacerraf–Field challenge.Brett Topey - 2021 - Synthese 199 (1-2):4415-4436.
    A Benacerraf–Field challenge is an argument intended to show that common realist theories of a given domain are untenable: such theories make it impossible to explain how we’ve arrived at the truth in that domain, and insofar as a theory makes our reliability in a domain inexplicable, we must either reject that theory or give up the relevant beliefs. But there’s no consensus about what would count here as a satisfactory explanation of our reliability. It’s sometimes suggested that giving such (...)
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  15. Quinean holism, analyticity, and diachronic rational norms.Brett Topey - 2018 - Synthese 195 (7):3143-3171.
    I argue that Quinean naturalists’ holism-based arguments against analyticity and apriority are more difficult to resist than is generally supposed, for two reasons. First, although opponents of naturalism sometimes dismiss these arguments on the grounds that the holistic premises on which they depend are unacceptably radical, it turns out that the sort of holism required by these arguments is actually quite minimal. And second, although it’s true, as Grice and Strawson pointed out long ago, that these arguments can succeed only (...)
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  16. Signals that make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Paul E. Griffiths & Arnaud Pocheville - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx022.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks — from the way monkeys in a troop communicate, to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this paper, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and his (...)
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  17.  5
    Smeared Makeup and Stiletto Heels.Brett Lunceford - 2010-09-24 - In Fritz Allhoff, Michael Bruce & Robert M. Stewart (eds.), College Sex ‐ Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 51–60.
    This chapter contains sections titled: 7 a.m.: These Boots Aren't Made for Walking Dressing for (Sexual) Success Shamefulness and the Walk of Shame You Can Walk, But You Can't Hide (The Shame).
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  18. Higher-Order Evidence and the Dynamics of Self-Location: An Accuracy-Based Argument for Calibrationism.Brett Topey - 2022 - Erkenntnis 89 (4):1407-1433.
    The thesis that agents should calibrate their beliefs in the face of higher-order evidence—i.e., should adjust their first-order beliefs in response to evidence suggesting that the reasoning underlying those beliefs is faulty—is sometimes thought to be in tension with Bayesian approaches to belief update: in order to obey Bayesian norms, it’s claimed, agents must remain steadfast in the face of higher-order evidence. But I argue that this claim is incorrect. In particular, I motivate a minimal constraint on a reasonable treatment (...)
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  19. Best Laid Plans: Idealization and the Rationality–Accuracy Bridge.Brett Topey - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Hilary Greaves and David Wallace argue that conditionalization maximizes expected accuracy and so is a rational requirement, but their argument presupposes a particular picture of the bridge between rationality and accuracy: the Best-Plan-to-Follow picture. And theorists such as Miriam Schoenfield and Robert Steel argue that it's possible to motivate an alternative picture—the Best-Plan-to-Make picture—that does not vindicate conditionalization. I show that these theorists are mistaken: it turns out that, if an update procedure maximizes expected accuracy on the Best-Plan-to-Follow picture, it's (...)
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  20.  33
    Keeping David From Bathsheba: The Four-Star General’s Staff as Nathan.Brett D. Weigle & Charles D. Allen - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):94-113.
    Readers of reports on ethical failures by four-star general officers must wonder, “Don’t they have staffs to ensure that the general follows ethics rules?” The Department of Defense publishes robust ethics guidance in several documents; however, a staff’s best efforts to implement this guidance may fail to make an impression on a senior leader who is susceptible to the “Bathsheba syndrome,” an allusion to the biblical account where the prophet Nathan rebuked King David for his moral failings. This paper proposes (...)
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  21.  36
    Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World by Timothy Morton.Brett Bricker - 2015 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (3):359-365.
    Object-oriented ontology has emerged as an academic field primarily devoted to opening inquiry into the relationship between human and nonhuman objects. By treating human and nonhuman things as ontologically coequal, this emerging philosophical school has rejected the correlationist and anthropocentric tendencies of most ethical systems. However, as objects expand and multiply, some become so big that they can’t be seen, understood, or described in the ordinary spatiotemporal sense. Precisely because they are here but cannot be consistently experienced, these unique objects (...)
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  22.  18
    Physicians Have a Responsibility to Meet the Health Care Needs of Society.Allan S. Brett - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):526-531.
    In one of the televised debates among Republican primary candidates for the 2012 U.S. presidential election, moderator Wolf Blitzer presented this hypothetical case to candidate Ron Paul:A healthy 30 year old young man has a good job, makes a good living, but decides — you know what — ‘I’m not going to spend 200 or 300 dollars a month for health insurance because I’m healthy, I don’t need it.’ But something terrible happens, all of a sudden he needs it. Who’s (...)
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  23. Wittgenstein's preface.Brett Bourbon - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):428-443.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Wittgenstein’s PrefaceBrett BourbonIn his preface to Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein admits his failure to make his book anything more than an interrelated collection of remarks: "After several unsuccessful attempts to weld my results together into... a whole, I realized that I should never succeed. The best I could write would never be more than philosophical remarks." The fragmented character of Investigations is matched by its other formal oddities and difficulties: (...)
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  24.  18
    Scepticism and Vain Questions.Nathan Brett - 1974 - Dialogue 13 (4):657-673.
    In this paper I shall consider Hume's claim that it is in vain to ask “Whether there be body or not?’ I have often been puzzled by this interesting remark; puzzled as to just what he meant by it, why he said it, and whether he was right. I don't expect to do any more than explore some of the possibilities and suggest some tentative answers in this discussion. Hume seems to have argued that we can't take this question seriously (...)
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  25.  14
    Melville's Anatomies. Samuel OtterHerman Melville: Stargazer. Brett Zimmerman.T. Hugh Crawford - 2000 - Isis 91 (4):789-791.
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  26.  11
    Melville's Anatomies by Samuel Otter; Herman Melville: Stargazer by Brett Zimmerman.T. Crawford - 2000 - Isis 91:789-791.
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  27.  20
    Salmonella: Now you see it, now you don't.Murry A. Stein, Scott D. Mills & B. Brett Finlay - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (8):537-538.
    Diseases caused by Salmonella species are characterized by bacterial invasion of host cells. Salmonella invasion requires a genetic locus (inv) with homology to bacterial systems involved in specific protein export and organelle assembly. Until recently, the actual Salmonella invasion factors exported or assembled by the inv system remained unidentified. It now appears that Salmonella produces novel appendages upon contact with host cells. These appendages are transient, appearing and disappearing rapidly from the bacterial surface. Appendages are altered in strains unable to (...)
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  28.  10
    Paramedic use and understanding of their professional code of conduct.Derek Collings-Hughes, Ruth Townsend & Brett Williams - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (2):258-275.
    Background Paramedicine is a newly regulated profession in Australia and with the introduction of regulation in 2018 for this profession came increased responsibilities – including the introduction of a professional code of conduct. Several countries now have regulation of paramedicine and associated professional codes to guide ethical and professional behaviour. Despite this, there has been no published research into paramedic understanding and use of their professional codes. Objectives To explore Australian paramedics’ use and understanding of their professional code of conduct. (...)
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  29.  18
    Teaching Justice Aesthetically: Dwelling in Japanese American Art and Religion.Courtney T. Goto - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):119-124.
    Enfolding Silence is a rare gem for exploring the aesthetic dimensions of epistemology and meaning-making through the arts in the context of historic communal injury. Author Brett Esaki invites his audience to consider how Japanese Americans have developed various art forms to cope with, resist, and transform traumatic experiences of racism, including the mass, unlawful internment of nearly 120,000 people of Japanese descent during World War II. By examining an extended ethnographic case study, educators and students can reflect on (...)
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  30.  36
    On ‘moral injury’.Kenneth MacLeish - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (2):128-146.
    This article is concerned with theories and therapeutic practices that interpret post-traumatic combat stress as a ‘moral injury’ produced by the shock of carrying out lethal violence in uncertain battlefield conditions. While moral injury is said to share many symptoms with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), its proponents – military and Veterans Health Administration clinical psychologists, chaplains, and some psychiatrists – are concerned by PTSD’s inability to account for the meaning-based moral and ethical distress that counterinsurgency battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan (...)
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  31.  21
    English Literature and British Philosophy: A Collection of Essays.Stanford Patrick Rosenbaum - 1971 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Fish, S. Georgics of the mind: Bacon's philosophy and the experience of his Essays.--Brett, R. L. Thomas Hobbes.--Watt, I. Realism and the novel.--Tuveson, E. Locke and Sterne.--Kampf, L. Gibbon and Hume.--Frye, N. Blake's case against Locke.--Abrams, M. H. Mechanical and organic psychologies of literary invention.--Ryle, G. Jane Austen and the moralists.--Schneewind, J. B. Moral problems and moral philosophy in the Victorian period.--Donagan, A. Victorian philosophical prose: J. S. Mill and F. H. Bradley.--Pitcher, G. Wittgenstein, nonsense, and Lewis Carroll.--Bolgan, A. (...)
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  32. Publish and Be Damned? continent. visits independent publishers fair.Bernhard Garnicnig - 2012 - Continent 2 (4):269-288.
    I love books for many things, but I despise them for introducing a physical limit to the free circulation of knowledge (compared to the Internet). At least, that's what I had always thought. continent. is an online journal aiming at, among other things, breaking with the established paradigms of how academic work has to be published in order to be respected among relevant peers. I'm the engineer behind the current version of continent. , making it work and keeping it running (...)
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  33.  31
    The Hume Literature for 1983.Roland Hall - 1985 - Hume Studies 11 (2):192-197.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:192. THE HUME LITERATURE FOR 1983 The Hume literature from 1925 to 1976 has been thoroughly covered in my book Fifty Years of Hume Scholarship: A Bibliographical Guide (Edinburgh University Press, 1978; £9.50), which also lists the main earlier writings on Hume. Publications of the years 1977 to 1982 were listed in Hume Studies in previous Novembers. What follows here will bring the record up to the end of (...)
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  34. Knowledge: Undefeated Justified True Belief.T. Paxson & K. Lehrer - 2000 - In Sven Bernecker & Fred I. Dretske (eds.), Knowledge: readings in contemporary epistemology. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  35. Metaphysics and morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2010 - In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 7 - 22.
    This essay argues that normative judgments, in general, and moral judgments, in particular, are "truth apt" and can be objects of belief. Other main claims are: judgments about reasons, if interpreted as true, do not have metaphysical implications that are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. Two kinds of normative claims should be distinguished: substantive claims about what reasons people have and structural claims about what attitudes people must have insofar as they are rational. Employing this distinction, the (...)
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  36.  26
    Phenomenology and Biosemiotics.Morten Tønnessen, Timo Maran & Alexei Sharov - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):323-330.
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  37.  47
    Are there two processes in reasoning? The dimensionality of inductive and deductive inferences.Rachel G. Stephens, John C. Dunn & Brett K. Hayes - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (2):218-244.
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  38. The Spin-Echo Experiments and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.T. M. Ridderbos & M. L. G. Redhead - 1998 - Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1237-1270.
    We introduce a simple model for so-called spin-echo experiments. We show that the model is a mincing system. On the basis of this model we study fine-grained entropy and coarse-grained entropy descriptions of these experiments. The coarse-grained description is shown to be unable to provide an explanation of the echo signals, as a result of the way in which it ignores dynamically generated correlations. This conclusion is extended to the general debate on the foundations of statistical mechanics. We emphasize the (...)
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  39.  31
    Religion, upbringing and liberal values: A rejoinder to Eamonn Callan.T. H. McLaughlin - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (1):119–127.
    T H McLaughlin; Religion, Upbringing and Liberal Values: a rejoinder to Eamonn Callan, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 19, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Page.
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  40.  62
    The evolutionary contingency thesis and evolutionary idiosyncrasies.T. Y. William Wong - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):22.
    Much philosophical progress has been made in elucidating the idea of evolutionary contingency in a recent re-burgeoning of the debate. However, additional progress has been impaired on three fronts. The first relates to its characterisation: the under-specification of various contingency claims has made it difficult to conceptually pinpoint the scope to which ‘contingency’ allegedly extends, as well as which biological forms are in contention. That is—there appears to be no systematic means with which to fully specify contingency claims which has (...)
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  41.  29
    Discourse-mediation of the mapping between language and the visual world: Eye movements and mental representation.Yuki Kamide Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):55.
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  42. Reply to Leif Wenar.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):400-405.
    Explains how a contractualist moral theory can explain the moral phenomena commonly called rights, although it does not appeal to the notion of a right as a basic element of moral thinking, or explain the difference between rights violations and wrongs of other kinds. Argues that the latter failure is not an important fault.
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  43.  38
    Phenomenology and Contemplative Universals: The Meditative Experience of Dhyana, Coalescence, or Access Concentration.T. Sparby - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (7-8):130-156.
    Are there universal structures or stages of experience, so-called contemplative landmarks, that unfold during meditative practice? As commonly described in contemplative manuals or handbooks, there is a transition from a form of meditation where the subject must exert continual effort in order for consciousness to remain focused. As Kenneth Rose has recently shown, these manuals, stemming from the Buddhist, Hindu, and Christian traditions, agree that a transition will take place from effortful meditation into a state where attention is fixed or (...)
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  44. Information Loss as a Foundational Principle for the Second Law of Thermodynamics.T. L. Duncan & J. S. Semura - 2007 - Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1767-1773.
    In a previous paper (Duncan, T.L., Semura, J.S. in Entropy 6:21, 2004) we considered the question, “What underlying property of nature is responsible for the second law?” A simple answer can be stated in terms of information: The fundamental loss of information gives rise to the second law. This line of thinking highlights the existence of two independent but coupled sets of laws: Information dynamics and energy dynamics. The distinction helps shed light on certain foundational questions in statistical mechanics. For (...)
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  45.  22
    Open Mind: An Open Access Collection of Research on Mind, Brain, and.T. Metzinger & J. Windt - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (7-8):233-234.
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  46.  12
    Getting to the source of the illusion of consensus.Saoirse Connor Desai, Belinda Xie & Brett K. Hayes - 2022 - Cognition 223 (C):105023.
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  47.  14
    The role of language in novel task learning.Felice van 'T. Wout & Christopher Jarrold - 2020 - Cognition 194:104036.
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  48.  14
    Adding Types, But Not Tokens, Affects Property Induction.Belinda Xie, Danielle J. Navarro & Brett K. Hayes - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9):e12895.
    The extent to which we generalize a novel property from a sample of familiar instances to novel instances depends on the sample composition. Previous property induction experiments have only used samples consisting of novel types (unique entities). Because real‐world evidence samples often contain redundant tokens (repetitions of the same entity), we studied the effects on property induction of adding types and tokens to an observed sample. In Experiments 1–3, we presented participants with a sample of birds or flowers known to (...)
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  49.  18
    Elementary equivalences and accessible functors.T. Beke & J. Rosický - 2018 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 169 (7):674-703.
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  50.  12
    Dislocation sub-boundary arrays in oriented thin-film bicrystals of gold.T. Schober & R. W. Balluffi - 1969 - Philosophical Magazine 20 (165):511-518.
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