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Brett Bricker [3]Brett Jacob Bricker [1]
  1.  5
    When “I’M Sorry” Cannot Be Said: The Evolution of Political Apology.Jacob Justice & Brett Bricker - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):111-118.
    ABSTRACT Every social order depends on a pathway to atonement for those who breach behavioral expectations. However, observers from a variety of fields now agree that the United States has entered an age of non-apology, where the two words “I’m sorry” simply cannot be said, particularly by powerful men facing allegations of sexual misconduct. This essay draws attention to, and comments upon, this trend. We first identify the sociopolitical factors that have inaugurated the era of non-apology, namely growing political polarization. (...)
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    Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World by Timothy Morton.Brett Bricker - 2015 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (3):359-365.
    Object-oriented ontology has emerged as an academic field primarily devoted to opening inquiry into the relationship between human and nonhuman objects. By treating human and nonhuman things as ontologically coequal, this emerging philosophical school has rejected the correlationist and anthropocentric tendencies of most ethical systems. However, as objects expand and multiply, some become so big that they can’t be seen, understood, or described in the ordinary spatiotemporal sense. Precisely because they are here but cannot be consistently experienced, these unique objects (...)
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  3.  44
    Scientific Counterpublics: In Defense of the Environmental Scientist as Public Intellectual.Brett Jacob Bricker - 2019 - Topoi 38 (4):681-692.
    Global warming and climate change pose a significant threat to the livelihoods of future generations. Although there is a consensus among qualified climate scientists who believe that scientific evidence supports anthropogenic climate change theories, this has not translated into public understanding or trust in these theories. In this essay, I trace policy debates in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s concerning the link between CFC pollution and ozone depletion. Based on a rich tradition of counterpublic scholarship and empirical (...)
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