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Bret W. Davis
Loyola University Maryland
  1.  37
    Heidegger and the will: on the way to Gelassenheit.Bret W. Davis - 2007 - Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press.
    The problem of the will has long been viewed as central to Heidegger's later thought. In the first book to focus on this problem, Bret W. Davis clarifies key issues from the philosopher's later period--particularly his critique of the culmination of the history of metaphysics in the technological "will to will" and the possibility of Gelassenheit or "releasement" from this willful way of being in the world--but also shows that the question of will is at the very heart of Heidegger's (...)
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  2.  13
    Expressing Experience: Language in Ueda Shizuteru’s Philosophy of Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2019 - In Gereon Kopf (ed.), The Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist Philosophy. Springer. pp. 713-738.
    As the central figure of the third generation of the Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy, UEDA Shizuteru 上田閑照 has not only followed in the footsteps of his predecessors, NISHIDA Kitarō 西田幾多郎 and NISHITANI Keiji 西谷啓治, but has taken several strides forward in their shared pursuit of what can be called a “philosophy of Zen.” The “of” in this phrase should be understood as a “double genitive,” that is, in both its objective and subjective senses. Ueda not only philosophizes about (...)
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  3.  18
    Country Path Conversations.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2016 - Indiana University Press.
    First published in German in 1995, volume 77 of Heidegger’s Complete Works consists of three imaginary conversations written as World War II was coming to an end. Composed at a crucial moment in history and in Heidegger's own thinking, these conversations present meditations on science and technology; the devastation of nature, the war, and evil; and the possibility of release from representational thinking into a more authentic relation with being and the world. The first conversation involves a scientist, a scholar, (...)
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  4.  40
    The kyoto school.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5.  4
    Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts.Bret W. Davis - 2010 - Routledge.
    Heidegger's writings are among the most formidable in the philosophy. The pivotal concepts of his thought are for many the source of both fascination and frustration. This title includes chapters that introduce and explain a key Heideggerian concept, or a cluster of closely related concepts.
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  6.  9
    Zen Pathways: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Practice of Zen Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This book, the first of its kind, offers a comprehensive introduction to the philosophy and practice of Zen Buddhism. It is written by an academic philosopher who, for more than a dozen years, practiced Zen in Japan while studying in universities with contemporary heirs of the Kyoto School. The book lucidly explicates the philosophical implications of Zen teachings and kōans, and critically compares Zen with other Asian as well as Western religions and philosophies. It carefully explains the original context and (...)
  7.  19
    Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis, Brian Schroeder & Jason M. Wirth (eds.) - 2011 - Indiana University Press.
    Set in the context of global philosophy, this volume offers critical, innovative, and productive dialogue between some of the most influential philosophical figures from East and West.
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  8.  16
    Beyond Philosophical Euromonopolism: Other Ways of—Not Otherwise than—Philosophy.Bret W. Davis - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):592-619.
    Philosophy must diversify or die.There are forms of difference undreamt of in academic philosophy's current efforts at diversification.Is Philosophy Western? Was philosophy born and raised exclusively in the Western tradition, or can it be found in at least some non-Western traditions? Is the phrase "Western philosophy" a specific restriction of a more universal field, or is it, as Heidegger and others have claimed, a tautology since philosophy defines the essential core of the Western tradition and it alone?1 Is it true, (...)
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  9.  24
    Conversing in Emptiness: Rethinking Cross-Cultural Dialogue with the Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:171-194.
    As we attempt to engender a dialogue between different philosophical traditions, one of the first of the topics which need to be addressed is that of the very nature of dialogue. In other words, we need to engage in a dialogue about dialogue. Toward that end, this essay attempts to rethink the nature of dialogue from the perspective of two key members of the Kyoto School, namely its founder, Nishida Kitar1945), and its current central figure, Ueda Shizuteru (b. 1926). The (...)
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  10.  9
    Country Path Conversations.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    First published in German in 1995, volume 77 of Heidegger’s Complete Works consists of three imaginary conversations written as World War II was coming to an end. Composed at a crucial moment in history and in Heidegger's own thinking, these conversations present meditations on science and technology; the devastation of nature, the war, and evil; and the possibility of release from representational thinking into a more authentic relation with being and the world. The first conversation involves a scientist, a scholar, (...)
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  11.  6
    Heidegger on the Way from Onto-Historical Ethnocentrism to East-West Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2016 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 6:130-156.
    Heidegger often asserted that Germany, as “the land of poets and thinkers,” has a central world-historical role to play in any possible recovery from the technological nihilism of the modern epoch. And yet, on numerous occasions, Heidegger also demonstrated a serious interest in dialogue with the East Asian traditions of Daoism and Zen Buddhism. How are Heidegger’s entrenched ethnocentrism and his interest in East-West dialogue related? While neither can be wholly confined to one or another period in his thought, this (...)
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  12.  5
    Forms of Emptiness in Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 190–213.
    This chapter examines the six forms that the teaching of emptiness takes in Zen. Before doing this, the chapter comments briefly on Zen's relation to the doctrinal sources upon which it critically and creatively draws. The Zen tradition understands itself to be based on Śākyamuni Buddha's profoundest teaching of Mahāyāna Buddhism, which has been passed down not through texts and doctrines but by way of face‐to‐face acknowledgment of awakening. The six rubrics which the notion of emptiness is used in the (...)
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  13. Toward a World of Worlds: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and the Place of Cross-Cultural Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 184-204.
     
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  14. Heidegger and asian philosophy.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 459.
     
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  15.  6
    Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts.Bret W. Davis - 2009 - Routledge.
    Heidegger's writings are among the most formidable in recent philosophy. The pivotal concepts of his thought are for many the source of both fascination and frustration. Yet any student of philosophy needs to become acquainted with Heidegger's thought. "Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts" is designed to facilitate this. Each chapter introduces and explains a key Heideggerian concept, or a cluster of closely related concepts. Together, the chapters cover the full range of Heidegger's thought in its early, middle, and later phases.
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  16.  14
    The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2014 - New York, NY: Oxford Handbooks.
    The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy covers, in detail and depth, the entire span of Japan’s philosophical tradition, from ancient times to the present. It introduces and examines the most important topics, figures, schools, and texts from the history of philosophical thinking in premodern and modern Japan. Each chapter, written by a leading scholar in the field, clearly elucidates and critically engages with its topic in a manner that demonstrates its contemporary philosophical relevance.
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  17.  7
    Engaging with the Japanese Philosophical Tradition of Engaged Knowing.Bret W. Davis - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):256-258.
    This review examines the main topics and the main thesis of Thomas Kasulis’s Engaging Japanese Philosophy. The book covers the entire fourteen-hundred-year history of philosophical thinking in Japan, with a focus on seven key Buddhist, Confucian, Native Studies, and modern academic philosophers. The author’s main thesis is that Japanese philosophers have predominantly aimed at an existentially “engaged knowing” rather than the kind of objectively “detached knowing” that has come to dominate modern western and—by colonial extension—most of modern Japanese academic philosophy.
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  18.  24
    Sharing Words of Silence: Panikkar after Gadamer.Bret W. Davis - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):52-68.
    This article elucidates and interpretively develops Raimon Panikkar's hermeneutics of intertraditional dialogue by way of setting it into sympathetic and critical dialogue with the predominantly intratraditional hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It argues that Panikkar's thought enables us not only to appreciate, but also to question the limits of the fundamental roles played by language and tradition in Gadamer's hermeneutics. Panikkar's own hermeneutical reflections arise directly out of intertraditional as well as interlinguistic experience; and they ultimately direct us toward the profoundest (...)
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  19.  32
    Returning the world to nature: Heidegger’s turn from a transcendental-horizonal projection of world to an indwelling releasement to the open-region.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):373-397.
    The central issue of Heidegger’s thought is the question of being. More precisely, it is the question of the relation between being and human being, the relation, that is, between Sein and Dasein. This article addresses the so-called turn in Heidegger’s thinking of this relation. In particular, it shows how this turn entails a shift from a transcendental-horizonal projection of world to “an indwelling releasement [inständige Gelassenheit] to the worlding of the world”. Although a wide range of pre- and post-turn (...)
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  20. Zen After Zarathustra: The Problem of the Will in the Confrontation Between Nietzsche and Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):89-138.
  21. Das Innerste zuäußerst: Nishida und die Revolution der Ich-Du-Beziehung.Bret W. Davis - 2011 - Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 36 (3):281-312.
    Nishida Kitarō developed a revolutionary account of the I-Thou relation, according to which the true self, in its deepest recesses, is turned inside out so as to be radically open to alterity. He thus offers an original and significant contribution to a countercurrent to the tendency toward solipsistic subjectivity in the history of modern Western philosophy. With his watershed essay ›I and Thou‹ he deserves to be recognized as key figure in the revolutionary movement toward an appreciation of alterity, a (...)
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  22.  14
    Dislodging Eurocentrism and Racism from Philosophy.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):115-118.
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  23.  17
    The Controversial Cultural Identity of Japanese Philosophy.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
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  24. Conversing in emptiness: rethinking cross-cultural dialogue with the Kyoto school.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Philosophical Traditions. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  25.  35
    The Significance of Japanese Philosophy.Masakatsu Fujita & Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
    When I deliver an introductory lecture on Japanese Philosophy, I always raise the following question: Is it appropriate to modify the word philosophy with an adjective such as Japanese? Philosophy is, after all, a discipline that addresses universal problems, and so transcends the restrictions implied in geographical descriptors. However, as Kuki Shūzō argues in his essay “Tokyo and Kyoto,” I think that this is only part, and not the whole truth of the matter.One’s thinking takes place within the framework of (...)
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  26.  18
    Is Philosophy Western? Some Western and East Asian Perspectives on a Metaphilosophical Question.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 36 (2):219-231.
    ABSTRACT This article examines East Asian as well as Western perspectives on the major metaphilosophical question: Is philosophy Western? Along with European philosophy, in the late nineteenth century the Japanese imported what can be called “philosophical Euromonopolism,” namely, the idea that philosophy is found exclusively in the Western tradition. However, some modern Japanese philosophers, and the majority of modern Chinese and Korean philosophers, have referred to some of their traditional Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist discourses as “philosophy.” This article discusses debates (...)
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  27.  9
    In and Out of Words.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 3 (1):105-134.
    What is the relationship between language and experience? This question was a central concern of the eminent Kyoto School philosopher and lay Zen master Ueda Shizuteru (1926–2019). In fact, this question has long been a focal issue of the Zen tradition. Famously, if also paradoxically, the Zen tradition has claimed to “not to rely on words and letters” even while producing volumes of texts: poetry and didactic discourses as well as encounter dialogues (mondō) and kōan collections. Critics have accused Zen (...)
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  28.  7
    A Philosopher Frog Leaps Out of the Western Well.Bret W. Davis - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (1):126-134.
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  29.  20
    Gadfly of Continental Philosophy: On Robert Bernasconi’s Critique of Philosophical Eurocentrism.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):119-129.
    This article examines the critique of philosophical Eurocentrism developed over the past two-and-a-half decades by Robert Bernasconi. The restriction of the moniker “philosophy” to the Western tradition, and the exclusion of non-Western traditions from the field, became the standard view only after the late eighteenth century. Bernasconi critically analyzes this restriction and exclusion and makes a compelling case for its philosophical illegitimacy. After showing how Bernasconi convincingly repudiates the identification of philosophy with Europe – asserted most explicitly by Continental philosophers (...)
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  30.  10
    Heidegger on East-West Dialogue: Anticipating the Event, Lin Ma.Bret W. Davis - 2010 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (3):327-329.
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  31.  12
    In Remembrance of Ueda Shizuteru.Bret W. Davis - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):292-293.
    Ueda Shizuteru 上田閑照, one of the most consequential and celebrated Japanese philosophers of the last hundred years, passed away on June 28, 2019, at the age of 93. A professor of religious studies at Kyoto University, he was not only a leading scholar of Meister Eckhart and Nishida Kitarō, he was a highly original philosopher in his own right and widely recognized as the central figure in the third generation of the Kyoto School. Moreover, he was not only one of (...)
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  32.  9
    Knowing Limits.Bret W. Davis - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (3):301-334.
    This essay is about “knowing limits,” both in the sense of acknowledging the inevitable perspectival limits of our knowledge, and in the sense in which the act of knowing delimits the parameters of that which is known. Moreover, it aims to cultivate a versatile perspectivism that is ethically oriented by a capacity for ecstatic empathy rather than an egocentric will to power. The essay begins with an examination of the mind/body problem as a paradigmatic case of perspectival ambiguity, making reference (...)
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  33.  5
    Korak unatrag kroz nihilizam. Radikalna orijentacija filozofije zena Nishitanija Keijija.Bret W. Davis - 2005 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 96 (1):121-139.
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  34. Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru’s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 201-220.
  35.  30
    Otherwise than the Will: Davis' Faithful Transgression of Heidegger.Bret W. Davis & Jason M. Wirth - 2009 - Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):135-142.
  36. On the Way to Gelassenheit: The Problem of the Will and the Possibility of Non-Willing in Heidegger's Thought.Bret W. Davis - 2001 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation shows how the problem of the will is at the very heart of Heidegger's thought---not only explicitly in his post-turn critique of the technological "will to will" and in his intimations of Nicht-Wollen or Gelassenheit---but in the twistings and turnings of the development of his thought-path as a whole. ;In Chapter 1, in the course of laying out the interpretive terms of the investigation, I also begin with a consideration of the "debate" between the two great 19th century (...)
     
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  37.  14
    Opening Up the West.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):57-83.
    This essay aims to help prepare the way for those trained in Western philosophy to enter into dialogue with non-Western traditions of phi­losophy such as that of Japan. This will be done mainly by means of critical examination of some key instances of the ambivalence—the tension between the openings and closures—toward dialogue with non-Western traditions found throughout the history of Western phi­losophy. After tracing this ambivalence back to the Greeks, and to the figure of Socrates in particular, the essay focuses (...)
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  38. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
  39. Provokativna podvojenost u japanskoj filozofiji religije: s fokusom na Nishidi i zenu.Bret W. Davis - 2009 - In Nevad Kahteran & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 116-145.
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  40.  2
    Reply to Graham Parkes: Nietzsche as Zebra: With both Egoistic Antibuddha and Nonegoistic Bodhisattva Stripes.Bret W. Davis - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (1):62-81.
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  41.  21
    Toward a Liberative Phenomenology of Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):304-320.
    The questions pursued in this essay are: What can philosophers today learn from a tradition of psychosomatic practice such as Zen Buddhism? How does such a tradition challenge the very methodology of our cerebral practice of philosophy? And finally: What would it mean to bring Western philosophy and the psychosomatic practice of Zen together, not necessarily to merge them into one, but at least to commute between them so that they may speak to and inform one another? In pursuing these (...)
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  42.  9
    The Legacy of Ueda Shizuteru: A Zen Life of Dialogue in a Twofold World.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):112-127.
    Ueda Shizuteru 上田閑照 (1926–2019) led a double life. And he taught us how we, too, can lead double lives. Or rather, he explained how we are already in fact doing so. It’s just that we don’t realize...
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  43.  12
    Ueda Shizuteru’s Zen Philosophy of Dialogue: The Free Exchange of Host and Guest.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):162-177.
    This essay seeks to understand the nature of both interpersonal and intercultural dialogue from the perspective of Zen Buddhism as it has been interpreted, in dialogue with Western philosophy and religion, by the central figure of the third generation of the Kyoto School: Ueda Shizuteru (1926–2019). It examines how Ueda develops a philosophy of interpersonal dialogue on the basis of Zen teachings and practices. In particular, it reveals how Ueda draws on Huayan and Zen Buddhist notions of “host” and “guest” (...)
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  44.  1
    Engaging Dōgen's Zen: the philosophy of practice as awakening.Jason M. Wirth, Brian Schroeder & Bret W. Davis (eds.) - 2016 - Somerville, MA: Wisdom Publications.
    How are the teachings of a thirteenth-century master relevant today? Twenty contemporary writers unpack Dogen's words and show how we can still find meaning in his teachings. Engaging Dogen's Zen is a practice oriented study of Shushogi (a canonical distillation of Dogen's thought used as a primer in the Soto School of Zen) and Fukanzazengi (Dogen's essential text on the practice of "just sitting," a text recited daily in the Soto School of Zen). It is also a study of the (...)
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  45.  17
    Lawlor, Leonard., Early Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (4):874-875.
  46.  9
    Review of Richard Capobianco, Engaging Heidegger[REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (9).
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  47.  12
    The Kyoto School: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2016 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 2:301-305.
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