9 found
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Brandon Cooke [8]Brandon L. Cooke [1]
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Brandon Cooke
Minnesota State University, Mankato
  1.  74
    Critical Pluralism Unmasked.Brandon Cooke - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (3):296-309.
    Artworks frequently are the objects of multiple and apparently conflicting aesthetic judgements. This commonplace of the artworld poses a challenge for realist metaphysics, because to assert conflicting judgements of an artwork seems to amount to asserting p & p. Critical pluralism is an ever-more frequently invoked solution to this impasse. What its varieties share in common is the claim that the disagreement between judgements is only an apparent one. I argue, however, that critical pluralism masquerades either as relativism or anti-realism. (...)
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  2.  21
    Ethics and Fictive Imagining.Brandon Cooke - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):317-327.
    Sometimes it is wrong to imagine or take pleasure in imagining certain things, and likewise it is sometimes wrong to prompt these things. Some argue that certain fictive imaginings—imaginings of fictional states of affairs—are intrinsically wrong or that taking pleasure in certain fictive imaginings is wrong and so prompting either would also be wrong. These claims sometimes also serve as premises in arguments linking the ethical properties of a fiction to its artistic value. However, even if we grant that it (...)
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  3.  9
    ‘Guilty’ Pleasures Are Often Worthwhile Pleasures.Brandon Cooke - 2019 - Journal of Scandinavian Cinema 9 (1):105-109.
    A guilty pleasure is something that affords pleasure while being held in low regard. Since there are more opportunities to experience worthwhile pleasures than one can experience in a finite life, it would be better to avoid guilty pleasures. Worse still, many guilty pleasures are thought to be corrupting in some way. In fact, many so-called guilty pleasures can contribute to a good life, because they are sources of pleasure and because they do not actually merit guilt. Taking pornography as (...)
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  4. Imagining Art.Brandon Cooke - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):29-45.
    Aesthetic discourse is highly metaphorical, and many art-critical metaphors seem to be genuinely informative. Aesthetic property realism holds that the characteristic terms of aesthetic discourse pick out mind-independent properties. The prevalence of metaphor is a problem for realism, then, because most art-critical metaphors are true only when artworks are imagined in a certain way. Realist attempts to consign metaphor to the roles of filling lexical gaps or picking out mind-independent but ineffable properties fail. I argue that a cognitivist aesthetic anti-realism (...)
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  5.  24
    When Art Can’T Lie.Brandon Cooke - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (3):259-271.
    Pre-philosophically, an artwork can lie in virtue of some authorial intention that the audience comes to accept as true something that the author believes to be false. This thought forces a confrontation with the debate about the relation between the interpretation of a work and the intentions of its author. Anti-intentionalist theories of artwork meaning, which divorce work meaning from the actual author’s intentions, cannot license the judgment that an artwork lies. But if artwork lying is a genuine possibility, then (...)
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  6.  17
    Drawing From Life.Brandon Cooke - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (4):449-464.
    Felicia Ackerman argues that it is often wrong to use real people in fiction because it harms them. I argue that even when drawing from life is wrong, the unethical use of real people as literary material may nonetheless be rationally justified, and not in purely self-interested, instrumentalist terms. Either ethical considerations are always overriding, and much of our creative and appreciative practices are morally corrupt, or ethical and aesthetic values are incommensurable. I defend the plausibility of the incommensurabilist alternative, (...)
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  7.  9
    Aesthetic Antirealism.Brandon L. Cooke - 2003 - Dissertation, St. Andrews
    A puzzle is generated by two intuitions about artworks: 1. There is no prima facie reason to take artworks to be mind-independent objects; 2. Aesthetic judgments are objective. These intuitions seem to be in tension, for if artworks or their aesthetic properties are mind-dependent, how can aesthetic judgments be objective? The common solution to the puzzle lies in rejecting or revising one of the two intuitions. Typically, realists reject 1, and many antirealists reject 2. I develop an antirealist aesthetic theory (...)
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  8.  17
    Sibley's Legacy.Brandon Cooke - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (1):105-118.
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  9.  5
    Sounding Off: Eleven Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Brandon Cooke - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):161-163.
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