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  1.  24
    The role of future unpredictability in human risk-taking.Elizabeth M. Hill, Lisa Thomson Ross & Bobbi S. Low - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (4):287-325.
    Models of risk-taking as used in the social sciences may be improved by including concepts from life history theory, particularly environmental unpredictability and life expectancy. Community college students completed self-report questionnaires measuring these constructs along with several well-known correlates. The frequency of risk-taking was higher for those with higher future unpredictability beliefs and shorter lifespan estimates (as measured by the Future Lifespan Assessment developed for this study), and unpredictability beliefs remained significant after accounting for standard predictors, such as sex and (...)
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  2. Comparing Snakes and Snails and Puppy-Dog Tails to Sugar and Spice: Reflections on Cross-Cultural Testing of Hypotheses.Bobbi S. Low - forthcoming - Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  3.  16
    Men in the demographic transition.Bobbi S. Low - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (3):223-253.
    Women’s fertility is the focus of most demographic analyses, for in most mammals, and in many preindustrial societies, variance in male fertility, while an interesting biological phenomenon, is irrelevant. Yet in monogamous societies, the reproductive ecology of men, as well as that of women, is important is creating reproductive patterns. In nineteenth-century Sweden, the focus of this study, male reproductive ecology responded to resource conditions: richer men had more children than poorer men. Men’s fertility also interacted with local and historical (...)
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  4. Ecological and socio-cultural impacts on mating and marriage systems.Bobbi S. Low - 2009 - In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5.  32
    Human sex differences in behavioral ecological perspective.Bobbi S. Low - 1994 - Analyse & Kritik 16 (1):38-67.
    Behavioral ecology, based in the theory of natural selection, predicts that certain behaviors are likely to differ consistently between the sexes in humans as well as other species: aggression, resource striving, information content of sexual signalling. These differences, though of course open to modification by cultural practice, arise because male and female humans, like males and females of other mammal species, typically optimize their reproductive lifetimes through different behaviors: males specializing in mating effort , and females in parental effort . (...)
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    Resources and reproduction: What hath the demographic transition wrought?Bobbi S. Low - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):300-300.
  7.  23
    Behavioral ecology of conservation in traditional societies.Bobbi S. Low - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (4):353-379.
    A common exhortation by conservationists suggests that we can solve ecological problems by returning to the attitudes of traditional societies: reverence for resources, and willingness to assume short-term individual costs for long-term, group-beneficial sustainable management. This paper uses the 186-society Standard Cross-Cultural Sample to examine resource attitudes and practices. Two main findings emerge: (1) resource practices are ecologically driven and do not appear to correlate with attitude (including sacred prohibition) and (2) the low ecological impact of many traditional societies results (...)
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