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  1.  3
    Regulatory and Policy Tools to Address Unproven Stem Cell Interventions in Canada: The Need for Action.Timothy Caulfield & Blake Murdoch - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-7.
    The marketing of unproven direct-to-consumer stem cell interventions is becoming widespread in Canada. There is little evidence supporting their use and they have been associated with a range of harms. Canada has been slower to act against clinics offering these interventions than other jurisdictions, including the United States. Here, we outline the regulatory and policy tools available in Canada to address this growing problem. Health Canada’s regulations governing cell therapies are complex, but recent statements make it clear that Health Canada (...)
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  2.  8
    Privacy and Artificial Intelligence: Challenges for Protecting Health Information in a New Era.Blake Murdoch - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundAdvances in healthcare artificial intelligence are occurring rapidly and there is a growing discussion about managing its development. Many AI technologies end up owned and controlled by private entities. The nature of the implementation of AI could mean such corporations, clinics and public bodies will have a greater than typical role in obtaining, utilizing and protecting patient health information. This raises privacy issues relating to implementation and data security. Main bodyThe first set of concerns includes access, use and control of (...)
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  3. Reconsenting Paediatric Research Participants for Use of Identifying Data.Blake Murdoch, Allison Jandura & Timothy Caulfield - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107958.
    When a minor research participant reaches the age of majority or the level of maturity necessary to be granted legal decision-making capacity, reconsent can be required for ongoing participation in research or use of health information and banked biological materials. Despite potential logistical concerns with implementation and ethical questions about the trade-offs between maximising respect for participant agency and facilitating research that may generate benefits, reconsent is the approach most consistent with both law and research ethics.Canadian common law consent requirements (...)
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    Health Misinformation and the Power of Narrative Messaging in the Public Sphere.Timothy Caulfield, Alessandro R. Marcon, Blake Murdoch, Jasmine M. Brown, Sarah Tinker Perrault, Jonathan Jarry, Jeremy Snyder, Samantha J. Anthony, Stephanie Brooks, Zubin Master, Christen Rachul, Ubaka Ogbogu, Joshua Greenberg, Amy Zarzeczny & Robyn Hyde-Lay - 20019 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 2 (2):52-60.
    Numerous social, economic and academic pressures can have a negative impact on representations of biomedical research. We review several of the forces playing an increasingly pernicious role in how health and science information is interpreted, shared and used, drawing discussions towards the role of narrative. In turn, we explore how aspects of narrative are used in different social contexts and communication environments, and present creative responses that may help counter the negative trends. As traditional methods of communication have in many (...)
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    Pragmatic Clinical Trials and the Consent Process.Blake Murdoch & Timothy Caulfield - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-14.
    Pragmatic clinical trials are a relatively new methodological approach to the execution of clinical research that can increase research efficiency and provide access to unique data. Some have suggested that the costs and delays associated with obtaining informed consent could make PCTs difficult or even impossible to execute. Alternative consent models have been proposed, some of which lower standards of disclosure, delay consent, or waive it altogether. We analyze the permissibility of changes to informed consent in the context of Canadian (...)
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  6.  3
    The Law and Problematic Marketing by Private Umbilical Cord Blood Banks.Blake Murdoch, Alessandro R. Marcon & Timothy Caulfield - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundPrivate umbilical cord blood banking is a for-profit industry in which parents pay to store blood for potential future use. Governments have noted the tendency for private banks to oversell the potential for cord blood use, especially in relation to speculative cell therapies not yet supported by clinical evidence. We assessed the regulatory landscape governing private cord bank marketing in Canada.Main bodyBecause the problematic marketing of private cord blood banking for future use often relates to speculative future cell therapies that (...)
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  7.  4
    Regulatory and Policy Tools to Address Unproven Stem Cell Interventions in Canada: The Need for Action.Timothy Caulfield & Blake Murdoch - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    The marketing of unproven direct-to-consumer stem cell interventions is becoming widespread in Canada. There is little evidence supporting their use and they have been associated with a range of harms. Canada has been slower to act against clinics offering these interventions than other jurisdictions, including the United States. Here, we outline the regulatory and policy tools available in Canada to address this growing problem. Health Canada’s regulations governing cell therapies are complex, but recent statements make it clear that Health Canada (...)
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