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  1.  11
    Why We Don’T Need “Unmet Needs”! On the Concepts of Unmet Need and Severity in Health-Care Priority Setting.Lars Sandman & Bjorn Hofmann - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (1):26-44.
    In health care priority setting different criteria are used to reflect the relevant values that should guide decision-making. During recent years there has been a development of value frameworks implying the use of multiple criteria, a development that has not been accompanied by a structured conceptual and normative analysis of how different criteria relate to each other and to underlying normative considerations. Examples of such criteria are unmet need and severity. In this article these crucial criteria are conceptually clarified and (...)
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  2.  23
    Not Out of Date, But Out of Value.Bjorn Hofmann - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (7):30-32.
    Volume 19, Issue 7, July 2019, Page 30-32.
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  3.  8
    Rethinking Patient Involvement in Healthcare Priority Setting.Lars Sandman, Bjorn Hofmann & Greg Bognar - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (4):403-411.
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  4.  1
    Avoiding Hypersensitive Reluctance to Address Parental Responsibility in Childhood Obesity.Eli Feiring, Gloria Traina, Joar Røkke Fystro & Bjorn Hofmann - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (1):65-69.
    Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem. Prior empirical research suggests that, although discussing lifestyle behaviours with parents could help prevent childhood obesity and its health-related consequences, physicians are reluctant to address parental responsibility in the clinical setting. Therefore, this paper questions whether parents might be responsible for their children’s obesity, and if so, whether parental responsibility ought to be addressed in the physician–patient/parent encounter. We illustrate how different ideal-typical models of the physician–patient/parent interaction emphasise different understandings of patient autonomy (...)
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