Results for 'Biotechnology'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Biotechnology: an agricultural revolution.Public Acceptability of Agricultural Biotechnology - 1995 - In T. B. Mepham, G. A. Tucker & J. Wiseman (eds.), Issues in Agricultural Bioethics. Nottingham University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The unexamined assumptions of intellectual property.Biotechnological Innovation - 2004 - Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (4).
  3.  10
    Biotechnology, Human Nature, and Christian Ethics.Gerald P. McKenny - 2018 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    In public debates over biotechnology, theologians, philosophers, and political theorists have proposed that biotechnology could have significant implications for human nature. They argue that ethical evaluations of biotechnologies that might affect human nature must take these implications into account. In this book, Gerald McKenny examines these important yet controversial arguments, which have in turn been criticized by many moral philosophers and professional bioethicists. He argues that Christian ethics is, in principle, committed to some version of the claim that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  35
    Cyborgs, biotechnologies, and informatics in health care – new paradigms in nursing sciences.Ana Paula Teixeira de Almeida Vieira Monteiro - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (1):19-27.
    Nursing Sciences are at a moment of paradigmatic transition. The aim of this paper is to reflect on the new epistemological paradigms of nursing science from a critical approach. In this paper, we identified and analysed some new research lines and trends which anticipate the reorganization of nursing sciences and the paradigms emerging from nursing care: biotechnology‐centred knowledge; the interface between nursing knowledge and new information technologies; body care centred knowledge; the human body as a cyborg body; and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5.  56
    Biotechnology - the Making of a Global Controversy.Martin W. Bauer & G. Gaskell (eds.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Biotechnology is one of the fastest-growing areas of scientific, technical and industrial innovation and one of the most controversial. As developments have occurred such as genetic test therapies and the breeding of genetically modified food crops, so the public debates have become more heated and grave concerns have been expressed about access to genetic information, labelling of genetically modified foods and human and animal cloning. Across Europe, public opinion has become a crucial factor in the ability of governments and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  6.  39
    How biotechnology regulation sets a risk/ethics boundary.Les Levidow & Susan Carr - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):29-43.
    In public debate over agricultural biotechnology, at issue hasbeen its self-proclaimed aim of further industrializingagriculture. Using languages of ’risk‘, critics and proponentshave engaged in an implicit ethics debate on the direction oftechnoscientific development. Critics have challenged thebiotechnological R&D agenda for attributing socio-agronomicproblems to genetic deficiencies, while perpetuating the hazardsof intensive monoculture. They diagnosed ominous links betweentechnological dependency and tangible harm from biotechnologyproducts.In response to scientific and public concerns, theEuropean Community enacted precautionary legislation for theintentional release of genetically modified organisms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  7. Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why We Should Pay Attention to the "Yuk Factor".Mary Midgley - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (5):7-15.
    We find our way in the world partly by means of the discriminatory power of our emotions. The gut sense that something is repugnant or unsavory—the sort of feeling that many now have about various forms of biotechnology—sometimes turns out to be rooted in articulable and legitimate objections, which with time can be spelled out, weighed, and either endorsed or dismissed. But we ought not dismiss the emotional response at the outset as “mere feeling.”.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  8.  7
    From Biotechnology to Nanotechnology: What Can We Learn from Earlier Technologies?Michael D. Mehta - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):34-39.
    Using Canada as a case study, this article argues that regulating biotechnology and nanotechnology is made unnecessarily complex and inherently unstable because of a failure to consult the public early and of-ten enough. Furthermore, it is argued that future regulators (and promoters) of nanotechnology may learn valuable lessons from the mistakes made in regulating biotechnology.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  9. Biotechnology, Justice and Health.Ruth Faden & Madison Powers - 2013 - Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):49-61.
    New biotechnologies have the potential to both dramatically improve human well-being and dramatically widen inequalities in well-being. This paper addresses a question that lies squarely on the fault line of these two claims: When as a matter of justice are societies obligated to include a new biotechnology in a national healthcare system? This question is approached from the standpoint of a twin aim theory of justice, in which social structures, including nation-states, have double-barreled theoretical objectives with regard to human (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  41
    Biotechnology and the Normative Significance of Human Nature: A Contribution from Theological Anthropology.Gerald McKenny - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (1):18-36.
    Does human nature possess normative significance? If so, what is it and what implications does it have for biotechnology? This essay critically examines three answers to these questions. One answer focuses on human nature as the ground of natural goods or goods dependent on human nature, another answer finds normative significance in the indeterminacy or malleability of human nature, and a third answer treats human nature as a natural sign of divine grace. Kathryn Tanner, who offers the second answer, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  43
    Biotechnology is compatible with sustainable agriculture.Donald Duvick - 1995 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):112-125.
    Biotechnology can provide appropriate new tools for use in solution of specific problems in sustainable agriculture. Its usefulness will depend in large part on the degree to which sustainable agriculturists understand the utility of biotechnology and apply it toward ends they deem important. Biotechnology can give little assistance to sustainable agriculture in the short term. It can be more useful in the medium term, and it could be highly useful in the long term as an integral part (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  33
    Environmental Biotechnology Research: Challenges and Opportunities in Latin America.Janeth Sanabria - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):681-694.
    Latin American countries have an extensive biological diversity and a tropical or subtropical climate. This condition has advantages for development and for the implementation of biotechnological solutions for environmental problems. Environmental biotechnology could be used to enhance biodegradation, waste recovery, and also for the development of biotechnology-based products to diagnose and reduce environmental impacts such as biosensors, biopesticides, biofertilizers and biofuels. To generate new environmental biotechnological products, Latin American countries must not only overcome the known limitations associated with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  77
    Biotechnology is not compatible with sustainable agriculture.Martha L. Crouch - 1995 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):98-111.
    Biotechnology increases commercialization of food production, which competes with food for home use. Most people in the world grow their own food, and are more secure without the mediation of the market. To the extent that biotechnology enhances market competitiveness, world food security will decrease. This instability will result in a greater gap between rich and poor, increasing poverty of women and children, less ability and incentive to protect the environment, and greater need for militarization to maintain order. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  10
    Societal Concerns with Biotechnology and Necessity of Regulations.Abu Sadat Mohammad Nurunnabi, Miliva Mozaffor, Mariya Tabassum, Taohidur Rahman Saikat, Nahid Kabir & Mohammad Akram Hossain - 2019 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):7-13.
    Biotechnology is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives to make or modify products or processes for specific use. Biotechnology is a constantly evolving field of modern science. New tools and products developed by biotechnologists are useful in research, agriculture, industry and healthcare. Although it has many benefits including lowering our environmental footprint, and helping in diagnosis and treatment of diseases, it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  32
    Biotechnologizing Jatropha for local sustainable development.Daniel Puente-Rodríguez - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):351-363.
    This article explores whether and how the biotechnologization process that the fuel-plant Jatropha curcas is undergoing might strengthen local sustainable development. It focuses on the ongoing efforts of the multi-stakeholder network Gota Verde to harness Jatropha within local small-scale production systems in Yoro, Honduras. It also looks at the genomics research on Jatropha conducted by the Dutch research institute Plant Research International, specifically addressing the ways in which that research can assists local development in Honduras. A territorial approach is applied (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  33
    Biotechnology and commodification within health care.Mark J. Hanson - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (3):267 – 287.
    The biotechnology industry's intellectual property claims contribute to a subtle but not insignificant encroachment of commodification within health care. Drawing on the conceptual framework of Margaret Jane Radin, I argue that patent claims on human biological materials may commodify that with which our personhood and individuality is intertwined but that such commodification is broad and incomplete. Patents on nonhuman biological organisms contribute to a more materialistic understanding of them but do not significantly change our relationship to them. The systemic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  17.  38
    Biotechnology and the new right: Neoconservatism's red menace.Jonathan D. Moreno & Sam Berger - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):7 – 13.
    Although the neoconservative movement has come to dominate American conservatism, this movement has its origins in the old Marxist Left. Communists in their younger days, as the founders of neoconservatism, inverted Marxist doctrine by arguing that moral values and not economic forces were the primary movers of history. Yet the neoconservative critique of biotechnology still borrows heavily from Karl Marx and owes more to the German philosopher Martin Heidegger than to the Scottish philosopher and political economist Adam Smith. Loath (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18.  10
    European Biotechnology Regulation: Framing the Risk Assessment of a Herbicide-Tolerant Crop.Rene von Schomberg, David Wield, Susan Carr & Les Levidow - 1997 - Science, Technology and Human Values 22 (4):472-505.
    As products of the "new biotechnology," genetically modified organisms have provoked a wide-ranging risk debate on potential harm, especially from herbicide-tolerant crops. In response to this legitimacy problem, the European Community adopted precautionary legislation, which left open the definition of environmental harm. When the U.K. proposed Europe-wide market approval of a herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape, the proposal encountered dissent from some countries and environmentalist groups. Further debate on normative judgments became necessary to implement the precaution ary legislation. In dispute were (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19.  48
    Crop Biotechnology for the Environment?Sven Ove Hansson & Karin Joelsson - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (4):759-770.
    In public debates, agricultural biotechnology is almost invariably discussed as a potential threat to the environment and to human health. Without downplaying the risks associated with this technology we emphasize that if properly regulated, it can be a forceful tool to solve environmental problems and promote human health. Agricultural biotechnology can reduce environmental problems in at least three ways: it can diminish the need for environmentally damaging agricultural practices such as pesticides, fertilizers, tillage, and irrigation. It can reduce (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  4
    Biotechnology.Jennifer Kuzma - 2009 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 523–531.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Decision‐making about New Technologies Case Studies for Biotechnology Guidance from the Public References and Further Reading.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  33
    Biotechnology, ethics and education.Peter John Fitzsimons - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (1):1-11.
    Fundamental differences between current and past knowledge in the field of biotechnology mean that we now have at our disposal the means to irreversibly change what is meant by ‘human nature’. This paper explores some of the ethical issues that accompany the attempt to increase scientific control over the human genetic code in what amounts to a diminishing of difference and the reduction of human life to scientific explanations at the expense of spiritual, cultural and communal considerations. Within such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Biotechnology and naturalness in the genomics era: Plotting a timetable for the biotechnology debate. [REVIEW]Hub Zwart - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):505-529.
    Debates on the role of biotechnology in food production are beset with notorious ambiguities. This already applies to the term “biotechnology” itself. Does it refer to the use and modification of living organisms in general, or rather to a specific set of technologies developed quite recently in the form of bioengineering and genetic modification? No less ambiguous are discussions concerning the question to what extent biotechnology must be regarded as “unnatural.” In this article it will be argued (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23.  40
    Agricultural biotechnology and the future benefits argument.Jeffrey Burkhardt - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):135-145.
    In the face of criticisms about the current generationof agricultural biotechnology products, some proponents ofagricultural biotechnology offer a ``future benefitsargument''''(FBA), which is a utilitarian ethical argument thatattempts to justify continued R&D. This paper analyzes severallogical implications of the FBA. Among these are that acceptanceof the FBA implies (1) acceptance of a precautionary approach torisk, (2) the need for a more proportional and equitabledistribution of the benefits of agricultural biotechnology, andmost important, (3) the need to reorient and restructurebiotechnology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  3
    Popularizing Biotechnology: The Influence of Issue Definition.L. Christopher Plein - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (4):474-490.
    In recent years, the image of biotechnology has been transformed from one of danger and uncertainty to one of opportunity and familiarity. This article explores the process of issue definition by examining the efforts of private interests and public officials. An analysis of interview data, public documents, and other sources reveals four methods of issue definition: establishing the "biotechnology industry" as a collective voice, forging alliances with established public and private interests, associating biotechnology with popular issues on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. 'Our Posthuman Future': Biotechnology as a Threat to Human Nature.Francis Fukuyama - 2002 - fsgbooks.
    In a sense, all technology is biotechnology: machines interacting with human organisms. Technology is designed to overcome the frailties and limitations of human beings in a state of nature -- to make us faster, stronger, longer-lived, smarter, happier. And all technology raises questions about its real contribution to human welfare: are our lives really better for the existence of the automobile, television, nuclear power? These questions are ethical and political, as well as medical; and they even reach to the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  26.  34
    Biotechnology as End Game: Ontological and Ethical Collapse in the “Biotech Century”.Zipporah Weisberg - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (1):39-54.
    I argue in this paper that animal biotechnology constitutes a dangerous ontological collapse between animals and the technical-economic apparatus. By ontological collapse, I mean the elimination of fundamental ontological tensions between embodied subjects and the principles of scientific, technological, and economic rationalization. Biotechnology imposes this collapse in various ways: by genetically “reprogramming” animals to serve as uniform commodities, by abstracting them into data and code, and, in some cases, by literally manipulating their movements with computer technologies. These and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  18
    Biotechnology and Faith. Relativism in the Postmodern Moral. A Christian-Orthodox Approach.Stefan Iloaie - 2009 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):38-52.
    The modern man lives in a more and more technologized world. This fact is obvious at every step of our life and, in the last decades, it went beyond any expectation. By using science and technology to procreate, prolong and sustain life, the man risks being dehumanized. Bioethics raises many questions that are waiting for an answer, and this answer is given by each person, according to his own values. One of the major challenges in the field of bioethics is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  35
    Biotechnology, the Limits of Norton's Convergence Hypothesis, and Implications for an Inclusive Concept of Health.Marc A. Saner - 2000 - Ethics and the Environment 5 (2):229-241.
    Bryan Norton proposes a "convergence hypothesis'* stating that anthropocentrists and nonanthropocentrists can arrive at common environmental policy goals if certain constraints are applied. Within his theory he does not, however, address the consideration ofnonconsequentualist issues, and, therefore, does not provide an argument for the convergence between consequentualist and nonconsequentualist ethical positions. In the case of biotechnology, nonconsequentualist issues can dominate the debate in both the fields of environmental ethics and bioethics. I argue that, the convergence hypothesis must be rejected (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  36
    Biotechnology and the Utilitarian Argument for Patents.Michele Svatos - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):113.
    Biotechnology surpasses even computer technology in predictions of its potential for revolutionary effects on humankind. It includes agribusiness and phar-maceuticals. The U.S. government began investing heavily in biotechnology research in the 1980s, and by 1987 had spent approximately $2.7 billion to support research and development, including $150 million for agricultural biotechnology. The approximately sixty U.S. biotechnology companies invested $3.2 billion in R and D in 1991 alone, with a total of more than $10 billion spent since (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  7
    Biotechnologies and Human Dignity.Joseph Masciulli & William Sweet - 2011 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 31 (1):6-16.
    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the International Declaration on Human Genetic Data (2003) and the Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights (1997) is useful, if not necessary, in engaging in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  60
    Biotechnology and Human Dignity.Emmanuel Agius - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):155-184.
    The precise meaning of “human dignity” is increasingly being questioned in ethics and law. Is human dignity an adequate guide to policymaking in today’s biotechnological era? This article is an attempt to answer this thorny issue. The emergence of the concept of human dignity as a key point of reference for the regulation of modern science and technology in the European Union is evaluated. The main contribution of this article is to prove that in EU Directives and Recommendations, human dignity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Biotechnology and ethics in India.Jyoti Dineshrao Bhosale - 2023 - In Purusottama Bilimoria & Amy Rayner (eds.), The Routledge companion to Indian ethics: women, justice, bioethics and ecology. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  29
    Biotechnology, ethics, and the structure of agriculture.Jeffrey Burkhardt - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):53-60.
    The “new” agricultural biotechnologies are presently high-priority items on the national research agenda. The promise of increased efficiency and productivity resulting from products and processes derived from biotech is thought to justify the commitment to R&D. Nevertheless, critics challenge the environmental safety as well as political-economic consequences of particular products of biotech, notably, ice-nucleating bacteria and the bovine growth hormone. In this paper the critics' arguments are analyzed in explicitly ethical terms, and assessed as to their relative merits. In some (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  34.  9
    Biotechnology activism is dead; long live biotechnology activism! The lure and legacy of market-based food movement strategies.Gabriela Pechlaner - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-15.
    Scholarly debate over the transformative potential of neoliberal, market-based, food movement strategies historically contrasts those who value their potential to reform the food-system from the inside against those who argue that their use concedes the primacy of the market, creates citizen-consumers, and undermines overall movement goals. While narrow case studies have provided important amendments, the legacy of such strategies requires impacts to be evaluated both contextually and more broadly than the specific activism. This study thus conceptualizes the ‘case’ of U.S. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  47
    Biotechnology and global justice.Tony Smith - 1999 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (3):219-242.
    Agricultural biotechnology is a social pursuit, undertaken by social agents within social institutions.1 Any attempt to explore the social dimensions of a profound and complex technological development such as biotechnology is bound to be controversial, and any attempt to formulate an ethical assessment of such a development is bound to be yet more complex and controversial. This surely explains why many choose to ignore these inquiries. But the social dimensions of biotechnology are just as real as viruses, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  66
    Biotechnology and the Fear of Frankenstein.Courtney S. Campbell - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):342-352.
    It is a commonplace in the scientific and corporate discourse advocating biotechnology that the public is largely uneducated or scientifically illiterate when it comes to understanding the research methods and goals of biotechnology. Public dissent from biotechnology is, in this understanding, based exclusively in irrational fears. The way to dispel these public fears is for scientists in the research community and among corporate culture to engage in education of the public. At one level, it is argued that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37. Food Biotechnology in Ethical Perspective.Paul Thompson - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (4):544-547.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  38.  24
    Genetic Biotechnology and Evolutionary Theory: Some Unsolicited Advice to Rhetors.David Depew - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):15-28.
    In his book The Biotech Century Jeremy Rifkin makes arguments about the dangers of market-driven genetic biotechnology in medical and agricultural contexts. Believing that Darwinism is too compromised by a competitive ethic to resist capitalist depredations of the genetic commons, and perhaps hoping to pick up anti-Darwinian allies, he turns for support to unorthodox non-Darwinian views of evolution. The Darwinian tradition, more closely examined, contains resources that might better serve his argument. The robust tradition associated with Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ernst (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  12
    A Biotechnology Patent Pool: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?David B. Resnik - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy, Science and Law 3:1-22.
    This paper discusses the idea of forming a patent pool in order to address some of the licensing problems in the biotechnology industry. The pool would be an independent, non-profit corporation that would manage patents and have the authority to grant licenses. The patent pool would not be a purely altruistic venture, since it would charge licensing fees. The pool would charge the market price for licensing services and reimburse patent holders for licensing activities. The pool would also provide (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  5
    Biotechnology: Plants and Animals.Bart Gremmen - 2009 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 402–405.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Intrinsic Value Environmental and Health Risks Human Hunger and Benefit‐sharing References and Further Reading.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  57
    Agricultural Biotechnology and Environmental Justice.Kristen Hessler - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):267-282.
    Agricultural biotechnology has long been criticized from an environmental justice perspective. However, an analysis, using golden rice as a case study, shows that golden rice is not susceptible to the main criticisms that are appropriate when directed at most products of agricultural biotechnology, and that golden rice has important humanitarian potential. For these reasons, an environmental justice evaluation of golden rice may need to be more nuanced and complex than a more traditional environmental ethics can provide. Study of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Biotechnology and the religion-science discussion.Ron Cole-Turner - 2006 - In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 929--944.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001713218; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 929-944.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 943-944.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Biotechnology, Ethics, and the Politics of Cloning.Steven Best & Douglas Kellner - unknown
    As we move into a new millennium fraught with terror and danger, a global postmodern cosmopolis is unfolding in the midst of rapid evolutionary and social changes co-constructed by science, technology, and the restructuring of global capital. We are quickly morphing into a new biological and social existence that is ever-more mediated and shaped by computers, mass media, and biotechnology, all driven by the logic of capital and a powerful emergent technoscience. In this global context, science is no longer (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  13
    Biotechnological Creations, Life and the State of Indistinction.Anuradha Nayak - 2017 - Balkan Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):91-100.
    Humanity is at crossroads of evolution. Modernity has established its omnipresence through science and technology. The impact is so significant that now it has penetrated our genetic structure through biotechnological creations. This brings into question the very foundation of the ideological life on which the edifice of the social structure is built. These new modalities raise unprecedented issues, such as: what is our understanding of life in relation to biotechnological creations, where is the original biological life positioned in such circumstances, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  57
    Whose prometheus? Transhumanism, biotechnology and the moral topography of sports medicine.Mike McNamee - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):181 – 194.
    The therapy/enhancement distinction is a controversial one in the philosophy of medicine, yet the idea of enhancement is rarely if ever questioned as a proper goal of sports medicine. This opens up latitude to those who may seek to use elite sport as a vehicle of legitimation for their nature-transcending ideology. Given recent claims by transhumanists to develop our human nature and powers with the aid of biotechnology, I sketch out two interpretations of the myth of Prometheus, in Hesiod (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  46.  8
    Ethics & Biotechnology.Anthony Dyson & John Harris - 1994 - Routledge.
    The development of biotechnology has produced nothing short of a revolution, both in our capacity to manipulate living things from single plant cells to human nature itself, but also to manufacture brand new life forms. This power to shape and create forms of life has sometimes been described as the power to "play God" and this book is about the ethics of "playing God" in the field of biotechnology. International scholars cover moral dilemmas posed by biotechnology, from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Agricultural Biotechnology and the Environment: Science, Policy, and Social Issues.S. Krimsky, R. P. Wrubel & Ronald Singer - 1996 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 40 (2):303-313.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48.  19
    Food Biotechnology's Challenge to Cultural Integrity and Individual Consent.Paul B. Thompson - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (4):34-39.
    Consumer response to genetically altered foods has been mixed in the United States. While transgenic crops have entered the food supply with little comment, other foods, such as the bioengineered tomato, have caused considerable controversy. Objections to genetically engineered food are varied, ranging from the religious to the aesthetic. One need not endorse these concerns to conclude that food biotechnology violates procedural protections of consumer sovereignty and religious liberty. Consumer sovereignty, a principle especially valued in this country, requires that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  9
    Genopolitics: Biotechnology Norms and the Liberal International Order.Jonathan Moreno - 2022 - In Tomas Zima & David N. Weisstub (eds.), Medical Research Ethics: Challenges in the 21st Century. Springer Verlag. pp. 35-45.
    What happens in the world’s most advanced life sciences laboratories, why those activities are important, and whether and how they can be brought under a uniform governance framework might be considered exquisitely esoteric matters in the context of the great geopolitical questions of our time. Nonetheless, the emerging issues in biotechnology—the use of living organisms to create new products and especially in the control of the human genome—represent a useful stress test for the future of the norms inherent in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  32
    How biotechnology and society co-constitute each other.Melentie Pandilovski - 2012 - Technoetic Arts 10 (1):125-130.
    This article deals with a critical examination of the philosophical underpinnings in regard to the development of technology in general, and biotechnology in particular. The text also focuses on the political and economic spectrum reflecting the socio-political consequences of the biotech revolution, and in that context also looks into the connections between the organization of biopolitics and biopower, and circumstances relative to the arts, sciences and social struggles, presenting biotech culture through a wide array of experiences and influences. This (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000