Results for 'Biosemiotics'

799 found
Order:
  1. The Biosemiotic Approach in Biology : Theoretical Bases and Applied Models.Joao Queiroz, Claus Emmeche, Kalevi Kull & Charbel El-Hani - 2011 - In George Terzis & Robert Arp (eds.), Information and Living Systems -- Philosophical and Scientific Perspectives. MIT Press. pp. 91-130.
    Biosemiotics is a growing fi eld that investigates semiotic processes in the living realm in an attempt to combine the fi ndings of the biological sciences and semiotics. Semiotic processes are more or less what biologists have typically referred to as “ signals, ” “ codes, ”and “ information processing ”in biosystems, but these processes are here understood under the more general notion of semiosis, that is, the production, action, and interpretation of signs. Thus, biosemiotics can be seen (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  49
    The Biosemiotic Glossary Project: Umwelt.Morten Tønnessen, Riin Magnus & Carlo Brentari - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (1):129-149.
    This is the second article in a series of review articles addressing biosemiotic terminology. The biosemiotic glossary project is designed to integrate views of members within the biosemiotic community based on a standard survey and related publications. The methodology section describes the format of the survey conducted July–August 2014 in preparation of the current review and targeted on Jakob von Uexküll’s term ‘Umwelt’. Next, we summarize denotation, synonyms and antonyms, with special emphasis on the denotation of this term in current (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3.  31
    The Biosemiotic Glossary Project: Agent, Agency.Morten Tønnessen - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (1):125-143.
    The current article is the first in a series of review articles addressing biosemiotic terminology. The biosemiotic glossary project is inclusive and designed to integrate views of a representative group of members within the biosemiotic community based on a standard survey and related publications. The methodology section describes the format of the survey conducted in November–December 2013 in preparation of the current review and targeted on the terms ‘agent’ and ‘agency’. Next, I summarize denotation, synonyms and antonyms, with special emphasis (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  4. Biosemiotics and Applied Evolutionary Epistemology: A Comparison.Nathalie Gontier & M. Facoetti - 2021 - In In: Pagni E., Theisen Simanke R. (eds) Biosemiotics and Evolution. Interdisciplinary Evolution Research, vol 6. Springer, Cham. Cham: pp. 175-199.
    Both biosemiotics and evolutionary epistemology are concerned with how knowledge evolves. (Applied) Evolutionary Epistemology thereby focuses on identifying the units, levels, and mechanisms or processes that underlie the evolutionary development of knowing and knowledge, while biosemiotics places emphasis on the study of how signs underlie the development of meaning. We compare the two schools of thought and analyze how in delineating their research program, biosemiotics runs into several problems that are overcome by evolutionary epistemologists. For one, by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  22
    The Biosemiotic Glossary Project: Intentionality.Donald Favareau & Arran Gare - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (3):413-459.
    In 2014, Morten Tønnessen and the editors of Biosemiotics officially launched the Biosemiotic Glossary Project in the effort to: solidify and detail established terminology being used in the field of Biosemiotics for the benefit of newcomers and outsiders; and to by involving the entire biosemiotics community, to contribute innovatively in the theoretical development of biosemiotic theory and vocabulary via the discussions that result. Biosemiotics, in its concern with explaining the emergence of, and the relations between, both (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Biosemiotic and psychopathology of the ordo amoris. Biosemiotica e psicopatologia dell'ordo amoris. In dialogo con Max Scheler.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - Milano MI, Italia: FrancoAngeli.
    How comes that two organisms can interact with each other or that we can comprehend what the other experiences? The theories of embodiment, intersubjectivity or empathy have repeatedly taken as their starting point an individualistic assumption (the comprehension of the other comes after the self-comprehension) or a cognitivist one (the affective dimension follows the cognitive process). The thesis of this book is that there are no two isolated entities at the origin which successively interact with each other. There is, rather, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  13
    Fluid Biosemiotic Mechanisms Underlie Subconscious Habits.V. N. Alexander & Valerie Grimes - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (3):337-353.
    Although research into the biosemiotic mechanisms underlying the purposeful behavior of brainless living systems is extensive, researchers have not adequately described biosemiosis among neurons. As the conscious use of signs is well-covered by the various fields of semiotics, we focus on subconscious sign action. Subconscious semiotic habits, both functional and dysfunctional, may be created and reinforced in the brain not necessarily in a logical manner and not necessarily through repeated reinforcement. We review literature that suggests hypnosis may be effective in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  27
    Biosemiotic Questions.Kalevi Kull, Claus Emmeche & Donald Favareau - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):41-55.
    This paper examines the biosemiotic approach to the study of life processes by fashioning a series of questions that any worthwhile semiotic study of life should ask. These questions can be understood simultaneously as: (1) questions that distinguish a semiotic biology from a non-semiotic (i.e., reductionist–physicalist) one; (2) questions that any student in biosemiotics should ask when doing a case study; and (3) still currently unanswered questions of biosemiotics. In addition, some examples of previously undertaken biosemiotic case studies (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  9.  29
    A Biosemiotic Approach to the Problem of Structure and Agency.Shahram Rafieian - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (1):83-93.
    A human being is the simultaneous composite of several different levels of being, from atomic and subatomic to the level of complex social interaction, and these levels are nested within the individual hierarchically (lower levels giving rise to higher levels, etc.). One of the most important and influential approaches developed in the history of science has been that of systems theory and systemic thinking, in which the different levels of the hierarchy, and the interactions between those levels, are considered simultaneously. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  16
    Biosemiotics Within and Without Biological Holism: A Semio-historical Analysis. [REVIEW]Riin Magnus - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (3):379-396.
    On the basis of a comparative analysis of the biosemiotic work of Jakob von Uexküll and of various theories on biological holism, this article takes a look at the question: what is the status of a semiotic approach in respect to a holistic one? The period from 1920 to 1940 was the peak-time of holistic theories, despite the fact that agreement on a unified and accepted set of holistic ideas was never reached. A variety of holisms, dependent on the cultural (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  27
    A biosemiotic perspective of the resource criterion: toward a general theory of resources.Almo Farina - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (1):17-32.
    Describing resources and their relationships with organisms seems to be a useful approach to a ‘unified ecology’, contributing to fill the gap between natural and human oriented processes, and opening new perspectives in dealing with biological complexity. This Resource Criterion defines the main properties of resources, describes the mechanisms that link them to individual species, and gives a particular emphasis to the biosemiotic approach that allows resources to be identified inside a heterogeneous ecological medium adopting the eco-field model. In particular, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  12.  25
    The Biosemiotic Glossary Project: The Semiotic Threshold.Claudio Julio Rodríguez Higuera & Kalevi Kull - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (1):109-126.
    The present article is framed within the biosemiotic glossary project as a way to address common terminology within biosemiotic research. The glossary integrates the view of the members of the biosemiotic community through a standard survey and a literature review. The concept of ‘semiotic threshold’ was first introduced by Umberto Eco, defining it as a boundary between semiotic and non-semiotic areas. We review here the concept of ‘semiotic threshold’, first describing its denotation within semiotics via an examination on the history (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13. A biosemiotic approach to the question of meaning.Jesper Hoffmeyer - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):367-390.
    A sign is something that refers to something else. Signs, whether of natural or cultural origin, act by provoking a receptive system, human or nonhuman, to form an interpretant (a movement or a brain activity) that somehow relates the system to this "something else." Semiotics sees meaning as connected to the formation of interpretants. In a biosemiotic understanding living systems are basically engaged in semiotic interactions, that is, interpretative processes, and organic evolution exhibits an inherent tendency toward an increase in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  14.  32
    Biosemiotics, the Extended Synthesis, and Ecological Information: Making Sense of the Organism-Environment Relation at the Cognitive Level.Manuel Heras-Escribano & Paulo de Jesus - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):245-262.
    This paper argues that the Extended Synthesis, ecological information, and biosemiotics are complementary approaches whose engagement will help us explain the organism-environment interaction at the cognitive level. The Extended Synthesis, through niche construction theory, can explain the organism-environment interaction at an evolutionary level because niche construction is a process guided by information. We believe that the best account that defines information at this level is the one offered by biosemiotics and, within all kinds of biosemiotic information available, we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  16
    Evolutionary Biosemiotics and Multilevel Construction Networks.Alexei A. Sharov - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (3):399-416.
    In contrast to the traditional relational semiotics, biosemiotics decisively deviates towards dynamical aspects of signs at the evolutionary and developmental time scales. The analysis of sign dynamics requires constructivism to explain how new components such as subagents, sensors, effectors, and interpretation networks are produced by developing and evolving organisms. Semiotic networks that include signs, tools, and subagents are multilevel, and this feature supports the plasticity, robustness, and evolvability of organisms. The origin of life is described here as the emergence (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  16.  23
    The Biosemiotic Fundamentals of Aesthetics: Beauty is the Perfect Semiotic Fitting.Kalevi Kull - 2022 - Biosemiotics 15 (1):1-22.
    We propose a model which argues that aesthetics is based on biosemiotic processes and introduces the non-anthropomorphic aesthetics. In parallel with habit-taking, which is responsible for generating semiotic regularities, there is another process, the semiotic fitting, which is responsible for generating aesthetic relations. Habit by itself is not good or bad, it is good or bad because of semiotic fitting. Defining the beautiful as the perfect semiotic fitting corresponds to the common conceptualisation of the aesthetic as well as extends it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  6
    A Biosemiotic and Ecoacoustic History of Bird-Scaring.Jacob Smith - 2022 - Biosemiotics 15 (1):67-83.
    Timo Maran has defined “biosemiotic criticism” as the study of human culture with an emphasis on the recognition that all forms of life are organized by sign processes. That approach guides this investigation of the sonic devices and practices that have been used in encounters between birds and humans in agricultural spaces. “Bird-scaring” has been a long-standing component of the semiotic relationship between humans and birds in what I am calling the agricultural semiosphere. The struggle between humans and “pest” species (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Biosemiotics of Plant Communication.Günther Witzany - 2008 - American Journal of Semiotics 24 (1/3):39-56.
    This contribution demonstrates that the development and growth of plants depends on the success of complex communication processes. These communication processes are primarily sign-mediated interactions and are not simply an mechanical exchange of ‘information’, as that term has come to be understood in science. Rather, such interactions as I will be describing here involve the active coordination and organisation of a great variety of different behavioural patterns — all of which must be mediated by signs. Thus proposed, a biosemiotics (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. A biosemiotic analysis of Braille.Louis J. Goldberg & Liz Stillwaggon Swan - 2011 - Biosemiotics 4 (1):25-38.
    Abstract A unique aspect of human communication is the utilization of sets of well- delineated entities, the morphology of which is used to encode the letters of the alphabet. In this paper, we focus on Braille as an exemplar of this phenomenon. We take a Braille cell to be a physical artifact of the human environment, into the structure of which is encoded a representation of a letter of the alphabet. The specific issue we address in this paper concerns an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy. [REVIEW]Mark Reybrouck - 2005 - Axiomathes. An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems. 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  21.  11
    Biosemiotics Achievement Award for the Year 2018.Maurita Harney & Riin Magnus - 2019 - Biosemiotics 12 (1):189-191.
    Established at the annual meeting of the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies on July3rd 2014, in conjunction with Springer Publishing, publishers of the Society’s official journal, Biosemiotics,the Annual Biosemiotic Achievement Award seeks to recognize those papers published in the journal thatpresent novel and potentially important contributions to the ongoing project of biosemiotic research, itsscientific impact, and its future prospects. Here the winner of the Biosemiotics Achievement Award for 2018is announced: the award goes to Mirko Cerrone for his article (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  75
    “Polanyian Biosemiotics and the From-Via-To Dimensions of Meaning”.Walter Gulick - 2012 - Tradition and Discovery 39 (1):18-33.
    A central aim of Michael Polanyi’s philosophy is to demonstrate the many ways in which human existence is meaningful to counter the nihilistic and positivistic accounts that contributed to the world wars and totalitarian governments in the twentieth century. Yet Polanyi’s references to various sorts of meaning is suggestive rather than systematic and coherent. The objective of this essay is to show the relationship between the different aspects of meaning by viewing their emergence in cosmological perspective beginning with simple forms (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  33
    A Biosemiotic Body of Law: The Neurobiology of Justice. [REVIEW]Gail Bruner Murrow & Richard W. Murrow - 2013 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):275-314.
    We offer a theory regarding the symbolism of the human body in legal discourse. The theory blends legal theory, the neuroscience of empathy, and biosemiotics, a branch of semiotics that combines semiotics with theoretical biology. Our theory posits that this symbolism of the body is not solely a metaphor or semiotic sign of how law is cognitively structured in the mind. We propose that it also signifies neurobiological mechanisms of social emotion in the brain that are involved in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  63
    Biosemiotics and the foundation of cybersemiotics: Reconceptualizing the insights of ethology, second-order cybernetics, and Peirce’s semiotics in biosemiotics to create a non-Cartesian information science.Søren Brier - 1999 - Semiotica 127 (1-4):169-198.
    Any great new theoretical framework has an epistemological and an ontological aspect to its philosophy as well as an axiological one, and one needs to understand all three aspects in order to grasp the deep aspiration and idea of the theoretical framework. Presently, there is a widespread effort to understand C. S. Peirce's (1837–1914) pragmaticistic semeiotics, and to develop it by integrating the results of modern science and evolutionary thinking; first, producing a biosemiotics and, second, by integrating it with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  25. A biosemiotic conversation: Between physics and semiotics.Howard H. Pattee & Kalevi Kull - 2009 - Sign Systems Studies 37 (1/2):311-330.
    In this dialogue, we discuss the contrast between inexorable physical laws and the semiotic freedom of life. We agree that material and symbolic structures require complementary descriptions, as do the many hierarchical levels of their organizations. We try to clarify our concepts of laws, constraints, rules, symbols, memory, interpreters, and semiotic control. We briefly describe our different personal backgrounds that led us to a biosemiotic approach, and we speculate on the future directions of biosemiotics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26.  33
    The Biosemiotic Turn.Donald Favareau - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):5-23.
    With the publication of this inaugural issue of the internationally peer-reviewed journal Biosemiotics, our still-developing young interdiscipline marks yet another milestone in its journey towards adulthood. For this occasion, the editors of Biosemiotics have asked me to provide for those readers who may be newcomers to our field a very brief overview of the history of biosemiotics, contextualizing it within and against the larger currents of philosophical and scientific thinking from which it has emerged. To explain the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. A biosemiotic and ecological approach to music cognition: Event perception between auditory listening and cognitive economy.Mark Reybrouck - 2005 - Axiomathes 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  28.  13
    A biosemiotic reading of Michel Onfray’s Cosmos: Rethinking the essence of communication from an ecocentric and scientific perspective.Keith Moser - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (225):405-421.
    In Cosmos, Onfray argues in favor of a conceptualization of communication based on recent scientific discoveries. Similar to many researchers in the field of biosemiotics, the controversial philosopher posits that all life forms engage in constant semiosis. As opposed to being a singular characteristic that only homo sapiens possess, Onfray contends that all organisms are endowed with semiosic faculties that enable them to exchange information in purposeful and meaningful ways. Appealing to scientific logic, the philosopher debunks the common misconception (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  10
    A Biosemiotic Encyclopedia: an Encyclopedic Model for Evolution.Ľudmila Lacková - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (2):307-322.
    New discoveries in the life sciences have affirmed that the virtual script as well as its context-dependent reading and interpretation determine the final living creature. An extended understanding of Darwinian Theory is crucial for understanding life as semiosis in terms of Peirce and Eco’s semiotic models. The semiosis of living systems is potentially unlimited. Genes are not static and unchangeable scripts, but can always be reinterpreted by new interpretants that illuminate them from different points of view, depending on which properties (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  5
    Biosemiotics Achievement Award for the Year 2019.Franco Giorgi & Maurita Harney - 2020 - Biosemiotics 13 (1):151-153.
    Established at the annual meeting of the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies on July 3rd 2014, in conjunction with Springer Publishing, publishers of the Society’s official journal, Biosemiotics, the Annual Biosemiotic Achievement Award seeks to recognize those papers published in the journal that present novel and potentially important contributions to the ongoing project of biosemiotic research, its scientific impact, and its future prospects. Here the winner of the Biosemiotics Achievement Award for 2019 is announced: the award goes to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  64
    A Short History of Biosemiotics.Marcello Barbieri - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (2):221-245.
    Biosemiotics is the synthesis of biology and semiotics, and its main purpose is to show that semiosis is a fundamental component of life, i.e., that signs and meaning exist in all living systems. This idea started circulating in the 1960s and was proposed independently from enquires taking place at both ends of the Scala Naturae. At the molecular end it was expressed by Howard Pattee’s analysis of the genetic code, whereas at the human end it took the form of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  32.  7
    Semiotics, Biosemiotics, and Aesthetics: the Concept of Beauty and Beyond.Mark Reybrouck - 2022 - Biosemiotics 15 (2):385-389.
    This short commentary expands a little on the disciplinary history of semiotics and biosemiotics, and its relation to aesthetics. It aims at positioning Kalevi Kull’s approach to this elusive matter (Kull, 2022 ) within this broader field by commenting on his attempts to connect semiotics, aesthetics, and biology. It highlights the merits of his approach to proceed thereafter to formulate possible extensions and directions for future research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Biosemiotics and Constructivism: Strong Allies. Review of “Essential Readings in Biosemiotics” edited by Donald Favareau.K. Bielecka - 2012 - Constructivist Foundations 7 (3):228-230.
    Upshot: The reader presents a unique collection of the most important works in biosemiotics. It spans 880 pages, describing classical and modern theories, with excerpts from the most significant papers on the topic of biosemiotics, as well as suggesting further reading on the topic.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  46
    Biosemiotics: Its roots, proliferation, and prospects.Thomas A. Sebeok - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  35.  21
    The Biosemiotic Concept of the Species.Kalevi Kull - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (1):61-71.
    Any biological species of biparental organisms necessarily includes, and is fundamentally dependent on, sign processes between individuals. In this case, the natural category of the species is based on family resemblances, which is why a species is not a natural kind. We describe the mechanism that generates the family resemblance. An individual recognition window and biparental reproduction almost suffice as conditions to produce species naturally. This is due to assortativity of mating which is not based on certain individual traits, but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  36.  2
    Biosemiotics and Religion: Theoretical Perspectives on Language, Society and the Supernatural.Joseph S. Alter - 2022 - Theory, Culture and Society 39 (1):101-121.
    An anthropological perspective on biosemiosis raises important questions about sociality, ecology and communication in contexts that encompass many different forms of life. As such, these questions are important for understanding the problem of religion in relation to social theory, as well as understanding our collective, biosocial animal history and the development of human culture, as an articulation of power, on an evolutionary time scale. The argument presented here is that biosemiotics provides a framework for extending Talal Asad’s genealogical critique (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Biosemiosis and Causation: Defending Biosemiotics Through Rosen's Theoretical Biology, or, Integrating Biosemiotics and Anticipatory Systems Theory.Arran Gare - 2019 - Cosmos and History 19 (1):31-90.
    The fracture in the emerging discipline of biosemiotics when the code biologist Marcello Barbieri claimed that Peircian biosemiotics is not genuine science raises anew the question: What is science? When it comes to radically new approaches in science, there is no simple answer to this question, because if successful, these new approaches change what is understood to be science. This is what Galileo, Darwin and Einstein did to science, and with quantum theory, opposing interpretations are not merely about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. A Biosemiotic Ontology : The Philosophy of Giorgio Prodi.Felice Cimatti - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    Giorgio Prodi was an important Italian scientist who developed an original philosophy based on two basic assumptions: 1. life is mainly a semiotic phenomenon; 2. matter is somewhat a semiotic phenomenon. Prodi applies Peirce's cenopythagorean categories to all phenomena of life and matter: Firstness, Secondness, and Thirdness. They are interconnected meaning that the very ontology of the world, according to Prodi, is somewhat semiotic. In fact, when one describes matter as “made of” Firstness and Secondness, this means that matter ‘intrinsically’ (...)
  39.  52
    Towards an Evolutionary Biosemiotics: Semiotic Selection and Semiotic Co-option. [REVIEW]Timo Maran & Karel Kleisner - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (2):189-200.
    In biosemiotics, living beings are not conceived of as the passive result of anonymous selection pressures acted upon through the course of evolution. Rather, organisms are considered active participants that influence, shape and re-shape other organisms, the surrounding environment, and eventually also their own constitutional and functional integrity. The traditional Darwinian division between natural and sexual selection seems insufficient to encompass the richness of these processes, particularly in light of recent knowledge on communicational processes in the realm of life. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  40. Biosemiotic Medicine: Healing in the World of Meaning.Farzad Goli (ed.) - 2016 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This book presents an interpretation of pharmaceutical, surgical and psychotherapeutic interventions based on a univalent metalanguage: biosemiotics. It proposes that a metalanguage for the physical, mental, social, and cultural aspects of health and medicine could bring all parts and aspects of human life together and thus shape a picture of the human being as a whole, made up from the heterogeneous images of the vast variety of sciences and technologies in medicine discourse. The book adopts a biosemiotics clinical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Biosemiotics: The Semiotic Web 1991.Thomas A. Sebeok & Jean Umiker-Sebeok (eds.) - 1992
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  42.  8
    A Biosemiotic Perspective on Reward-Based Animal Training Techniques.Amelia Lewis - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):767-782.
    In this paper, I examine the way humans interact with domestic companion animals, with a focus on ‘positive reward-based training’ methods, particularly for dogs. From a biosemiotic perspective, I discuss the role of animal training in today’s society and examine what binary reward- based reinforcement schedules communicate, semiotically. I also examine the extent to which reward-based training methods promote better welfare, when compared to the more traditional methods which rely on aversive stimuli and punishment, if and when they are relied (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  20
    A biosemiotic note on organisms, animals, machines, cyborgs, and the quasi-autonomy of robots.Claus Emmeche - 2007 - Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):455-483.
    It is argued in this paper that robots are just quasi-autonomous beings, which must be understood, within an emergent systems view, as intrinsically linked to and presupposing human beings as societal creatures within a technologically mediated world. Biosemiotics is introduced as a perspective on living systems that is based upon contemporary biology but reinterpreted through a qualitative organicist tradition in biology. This allows for emphasizing the differences between an organism as a general semiotic system with vegetative and self-reproductive capacities, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. The biosemiotic implications of 'bacterial wisdom'.Felipe-Andres Piedra & Donald R. Frohlich - manuscript
    Eshel Ben-Jacob’s manuscript entitled ‘Bacterial wisdom, Gödel’s theorem and creative genomic webs’ summarizes decades of work demonstrating adaptive mutagenesis in bacterial genomes. Bacterial genomes, each an essential part of a Kantian whole that is a single bacterium, are thus not independent of the environment as sensed; and a single bacterium is therefore a semiotic entity. Ben-Jacob suggests this but errs in 1) assigning autonomy to the genome, and 2) analogizing through computation without making clear whether he is doing so for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  6
    Biosemiotic Achievement Award for the Year 2020.Claudio Julio Rodríguez Higuera & Morten Tønnessen - forthcoming - Biosemiotics:1-4.
    The Annual Biosemiotic Achievement Award was established at the annual meeting of the International Society for Biosemiotic Studies in 2014, in conjunction with Springer and Biosemiotics. It seeks to recognize papers published in the journal that present novel and potentially important contributions to biosemiotic research, its scientific impact and its future prospects. Here the winner of the Biosemiotic Achievement Award for 2020 is announced: The award goes to Filip Jaroš and Matěj Pudil for the article “Cognitive systems of human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  98
    Theses on Biosemiotics: Prolegomena to a Theoretical Biology.Kalevi Kull, Terrence Deacon, Claus Emmeche, Jesper Hoffmeyer & Frederik Stjernfelt - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (2):167-173.
    Theses on the semiotic study of life as presented here provide a collectively formulated set of statements on what biology needs to be focused on in order to describe life as a process based on semiosis, or sign action. An aim of the biosemiotic approach is to explain how life evolves through all varieties of forms of communication and signification (including cellular adaptive behavior, animal communication, and human intellect) and to provide tools for grounding sign theories. We introduce the concept (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  47.  1
    A Biosemiotic Note On Organisms, Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, And The Quasi-autonomy Of Robots.Claus Emmeche - 2007 - Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):455-483.
    It is argued in this paper that robots are just quasi-autonomous beings, which must be understood, within an emergent systems view, as intrinsically linked to and presupposing human beings as societal creatures within a technologically mediated world. Biosemiotics is introduced as a perspective on living systems that is based upon contemporary biology but reinterpreted through a qualitative organicist tradition in biology. This allows for emphasizing the differences between an organism as a general semiotic system with vegetative and self-reproductive capacities, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Biosemiotics: A functional-evolutionary approach to the analysis of the sense of information.Alexei A. Sharov - forthcoming - Biosemiotics: The Semiotic Web.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49.  5
    Biosemiotics and formal ontology.Frederik Stjernfelt - 1999 - Semiotica 127 (1-4):537-566.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  4
    Grounding Biosemiotic Aesthetics: Extensions Back and Forward.Riin Magnus - 2022 - Biosemiotics 15 (1):41-45.
    Based on his previous elaborations on semiotic fitting, Kalevi Kull develops a relations-focused theory of beauty in the organic world. I will point to further strands of thought in the Western history of ideas that have introduced the convergence of the aesthetic and organic. The reflections of Immanuel Kant and the early romantics are foundational for these parallels, although not necessarily in concordance with the biocentric and biosemiotic stance of Kull. This comment also raises some questions related to the compatibility (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 799