Results for 'Biological Psychology'

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  1.  8
    Synopsis of five classical works by the Argentinian philosopher-psychiatrist José Ingenieros: principles of biological psychology, criminology, toward an ethic without doctrines, moral forces, mediocre man.Lazaros Constantinos Triarhou - 2013 - Indianapolis: Corpus Callosum.
    Principles of biological psychology -- Criminology -- Toward an ethic without doctrines -- Moral forces -- Mediocre man.
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  2. Biology, psychology, and belief.W. H. Thorpe - 1961 - Cambridge [Eng.]: University Press.
  3. Biology, Psychology and Belief.W. H. Thorpe - 1962 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (51):255-256.
     
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  4. Levels of explanation in biological psychology.Huib L. de Jong - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):441-462.
    Until recently, the notions of function and multiple realization were supposed to save the autonomy of psychological explanations. Furthermore, the concept of supervenience presumably allows both dependence of mind on brain and non-reducibility of mind to brain, reconciling materialism with an independent explanatory role for mental and functional concepts and explanations. Eliminativism is often seen as the main or only alternative to such autonomy. It gladly accepts abandoning or thoroughly reconstructing the psychological level, and considers reduction if successful as equivalent (...)
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  5.  10
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Conceptual Foundations of Field Theories in Physics-Reeh-Schlieder Meets Newton-Wigner.Andrew Wayne & Gordon N. Fleming - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S495-S515.
    The Reeh-Schlieder theorem asserts the vacuum and certain other states to be spacelike superentangled relative to local quantum fields. This motivates an inquiry into the physical status of various concepts of localization. It is argued that a covariant generalization of Newton-Wigner localization is a physically illuminating concept. When analyzed in terms of nonlocally covariant quantum fields, creating and annihilating quanta in Newton-Wigner localized states, the vacuum is seen to not possess the spacelike superentanglement that the Reeh-Schlieder theorem displays relative to (...)
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  6. Biology/psychology of consciousness: A circular perspective.Jane Cull & Massimo Bondi - 2001 - Constructivism in the Human Sciences 6 (1):23-29.
  7.  13
    Biological, Psychological, and Sociocultural Factors Contributing to the Drive for Muscularity in Weight-Training Men.Catharina Schneider, Laura Rollitz, Martin Voracek & Kristina Hennig-Fast - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  8.  8
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Conceptual Foundations of Field Theories in Physics-Mathematics and Reality: Two Notions of Spacetime in the Analytic and Constructionist Views.Andrew Wayne & Sunny Y. Auyang - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S482-S494.
    This paper presents two interpretations of the fiber bundle fonnalism that is applicable to all gauge field theories. The constructionist interpretation yields a substantival spacetime. The analytic interpretation yields a structural spacetime, a third option besides the familiar substantivalism and relationalism. That the same mathematical fonnalism can be derived in two different ways leading to two different ontological interpretations reveals the inadequacy of pure fonnal arguments.
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  9.  14
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams.Manfred D. Laubichier & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S260-S272.
    The biological sciences have become increasingly reliant on so-called ‘model organisms’. I argue that in this domain, the concept of a descriptive model is essential for understanding scientific practice. Using a case study, I show how such a model was formulated in a preexplanatory context for subsequent use as a prototype from which explanations ultimately may be generated both within the immediate domain of the original model and in additional, related domains. To develop this concept of a descriptive model, (...)
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  10. Mental Health Clinicians' Beliefs About the Biological, Psychological, and Environmental Bases of Mental Disorders.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Caroline C. Proctor & Elizabeth H. Flanagan - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (2):147-182.
    The current experiments examine mental health clinicians’ beliefs about biological, psychological, and environmental bases of the DSM‐IV‐TR mental disorders and the consequences of those causal beliefs for judging treatment effectiveness. Study 1 found a large negative correlation between clinicians’ beliefs about biological bases and environmental/psychological bases, suggesting that clinicians conceptualize mental disorders along a single continuum spanning from highly biological disorders (e.g., autistic disorder) to highly nonbiological disorders (e.g., adjustment disorders). Study 2 replicated this finding by having (...)
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  11.  13
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Ontological Butchery: Organism Concepts and Biological Generalizations.Manfred D. Laubichier & Jack A. Wilson - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S301-S311.
    Biology lacks a central organism concept that unambiguously marks the distinction between organism and non-organism because the most important questions about organisms do not depend on this concept. I argue that the two main ways to discover useful biological generalizations about multicellular organization—the study of homology within multicellular lineages and of convergent evolution across lineages in which multicellularity has been independently established—do not require what would have to be a stipulative sharpening of an organism concept.
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  12.  11
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Explanatory Symmetries, Preformation, and Developmental Systems Theory.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S322-S331.
    Some central ideas associated with developmental systems theory are outlined for non-specialists. These ideas concern the nature of biological development, the alleged distinction between “genetic” and “environmental” traits, the relations between organism and environment, and evolutionary processes. I also discuss some criticisms of the DST approach.
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  13.  12
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Organism and Character Decomposition: Steps Towards an Integrative Theory of Biology.Manfred D. Laubichier, Manfred D. Laubichler & Gunter P. Wagner - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S289-S300.
    In this paper we argue that an operational organism concept can help to overcome the structural deficiency of mathematical models in biology. In our opinion, the structural deficiency of mathematical models lies mainly in our inability to identify functionally relevant biological characters in biological systems, and not so much in a lack of adequate mathematical representations of biological processes. We argue that the problem of character identification in biological systems is linked to the question of a (...)
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  14.  12
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Development, Evolution, and Adaptation.Peter Godfrey-Smith & Kim Sterelny - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S322-S331.
    Some central ideas associated with developmental systems theory are outlined for non-specialists. These ideas concern the nature of biological development, the alleged distinction between “genetic” and “environmental” traits, the relations between organism and environment, and evolutionary processes. I also discuss some criticisms of the DST approach.
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  15.  11
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Development, Culture, and the Units of Inheritance.Peter Godfrey-Smith & James Griesemer - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S322-S331.
    Some central ideas associated with developmental systems theory are outlined for non-specialists. These ideas concern the nature of biological development, the alleged distinction between “genetic” and “environmental” traits, the relations between organism and environment, and evolutionary processes. I also discuss some criticisms of the DST approach.
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  16.  9
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Causal Democracy and Causal Contributions in Developmental Systems Theory.Peter Godfrey-Smith & Susan Oyama - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S322-S331.
    Some central ideas associated with developmental systems theory are outlined for non-specialists. These ideas concern the nature of biological development, the alleged distinction between “genetic” and “environmental” traits, the relations between organism and environment, and evolutionary processes. I also discuss some criticisms of the DST approach.
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  17.  11
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Philosophy of Chemistry-Putting Quantum Mechanics to Work in Chemistry: The Power of Diagrammatic Representation.Eric Scerri & Andrea I. Woody - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S612-S627.
    Most contemporary chemists consider quantum mechanics to be the foundational theory of their discipline, although few of the calculations that a strict reduction would seem to require have ever been produced. In this essay I discuss contemporary algebraic and diagrammatic representations of molecular systems derived from quantum mechanical models, specifically configuration interaction wavefunctions for ab initio calculations and molecular orbital energy diagrams. My aim is to suggest that recent dissatisfaction with reductive accounts of chemical theory may stem from both the (...)
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  18. Money as tool, money as drug: The biological psychology of a strong incentive.Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order (...)
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  19.  22
    A rapprochement of biology, psychology, and philosophy.Sandra Scarr - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):29-29.
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  20.  7
    Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Behavior at the Organismal and Molecular Levels: The Case of C. elegans.Manfred D. Laubichier & Kenneth F. Schaffner - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):S273-S288.
    Caenorhabditis elegans is a tiny worm that has become the focus of a large number of worldwide research projects examining its genetics, development, neuroscience, and behavior. Recently several groups of investigators have begun to tie together the behavior of the organism and the underlying genes, neural circuits, and molecular processes implemented in those circuits. Behavior is quintessentially organismal—it is the organism as a whole that moves and mates—but the explanations are devised at the molecular and neurocircuit levels, and tested in (...)
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  21.  18
    The philosophical bearings of biological psychology.Katherine Gilbert - 1923 - Philosophical Review 32 (3):294-300.
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  22.  39
    Integrative Neuroscience: Bringing Together Biological, Psychological and Clinical Models of the Human Brain.Evian Gordon (ed.) - 2000 - Harwood Academic Publishers.
    Recent multidisciplinary activity has provided the impetus to break down these boundaries and encourage a freer exchange of information across disciplines. This text reflects these developments.
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  23. The relations of Biology, Psychology and Sociology.Herbert Spencer - 1897 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 43:542-543.
     
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  24.  29
    The Biology and Evolution of the Three Psychological Tendencies to Anthropomorphize Biology and Evolution.Marco Antonio Correa Varella - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:400069.
    At the core of anthropomorphism lies a false-positive cognitive bias to over-attribute the pattern of the human body and/or mind. Anthropomorphism is independently discussed in various disciplines, is presumed to have deep biological roots, but its cognitive bases are rarely explored in an integrative way. I present an inclusive, multifaceted interdisciplinary approach to refine the psychological bases of mental anthropomorphism. I have integrated 13 conceptual dissections of folk finalistic reasoning into four psychological inference systems (physical, design, basic-goal and belief (...)
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  25. Psychology in its Relations to Biology.Robert M. Yerkes - 1910 - Philosophical Review 19:568.
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  26. Psychology in its relations to biology.Robert M. Yerkes - 1910 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 7 (5):113-124.
  27.  58
    Biological thinking in evolutionary psychology: Rockbottom or quicksand?H. Looren De Jong & W. J. Van Der Steen - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):183 – 205.
    Evolutionary psychology is put forward by its defenders as an extension of evolutionary biology, bringing psychology within the integrated causal chain of the hard sciences. It is extolled as a new paradigm for integrating psychology with the rest of science. We argue that such claims misrepresent the methods and explanations of evolutionary biology, and present a distorted view of the consequences that might be drawn from evolutionary biology for views of human nature. General theses about adaptation in (...)
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  28. Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, eds., Québec Studies in the Philosophy of Science Part II: Biology, Psychology, Cognitive Science and Economics Reviewed by.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (1):52-54.
  29.  31
    Telepathy As a Natural And Normal Process of Life Contextual Support from Biology, Psychology, and Philosophy.William Winter - 2022 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 29 (5-6):130-149.
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  30. Psychological altruism vs. biological altruism: Narrowing the gap with the Baldwin effect.Mahesh Ananth - 2005 - Acta Biotheoretica 53 (3):217-239.
    This paper defends the position that the supposed gap between biological altruism and psychological altruism is not nearly as wide as some scholars (e.g., Elliott Sober) insist. Crucial to this defense is the use of James Mark Baldwin's concepts of “organic selection”and “social heredity” to assist in revealing that the gap between biological and psychological altruism is more of a small lacuna. Specifically, this paper argues that ontogenetic behavioral adjustments, which are crucial to individual survival and reproduction, are (...)
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  31. Intentional psychology and evolutionary biology, part II: The crucial disanalogy.Alexander Rosenberg - 1986 - Behaviorism 14 (2):125-138.
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  32. Evolutionary psychology: A view from evolutionary biology.Elisabeth A. Lloyd & Marcus Feldman - 2002 - Psychological Inquiry 13 (2).
    Given the recent explosion of interest in applications of evolutionary biology to understanding human psychology, we think it timely to assure better understanding of modern evolutionary theory among the psychologists who might be using it. We find it necessary to do so because of the very reducd version of evolutionary theorizing that has been incorporated into much of evolutionary psychology so far. Our aim here is to clarify why the use of a reduced version of evolutionary genetics will (...)
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  33.  20
    Psychology, Biology and Social Relations.Ian Moll - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):49-76.
    Contemporary psychologists seem to pull in two theoretical directions, namely the reduction of mind to brain and the dissolution of mind in society. Against these dominant trends, this article employs the tools of critical realism to argue for the resuscitation in the discipline, psychology, of an ontologically distinct, psychological concept of mind. This ‘mind’ is conceived here as a real, ontologically emergent property. Its distinctive property is consciousness, generated in the first instance by unconscious, non-conscious and conscious psychological mechanisms. (...)
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  34.  23
    The Biology and Psychology of Moral Agency.William Andrew Rottschaefer - 1997 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This important book brings findings and theories in biology and psychology to bear on the fundamental question in ethics of what it means to behave morally. It explains how we acquire and put to work our capacities to act morally and how these capacities are reliable means to achieving true moral beliefs, proper moral motivations, and successful moral actions. By presenting a complete model of moral agency based on contemporary evolutionary theory, developmental biology and psychology, and social cognitive (...)
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  35. Psychology in its Relations to Biology.Robert M. Yerkes - 1910 - Journal of Philosophy 7:113.
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  36.  27
    Psychology on a Biological Foundation.Anders Wedberg & Jorgen Jorgensen - 1948 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 13 (2):124.
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  37.  37
    Why psychological accounts of personal identity can accept a brain death criterion and biological definition of death.David B. Hershenov - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):403-418.
    Psychological accounts of personal identity claim that the human person is not identical to the human animal. Advocates of such accounts maintain that the definition and criterion of death for a human person should differ from the definition and criterion of death for a human animal. My contention is instead that psychological accounts of personal identity should have human persons dying deaths that are defined biologically, just like the deaths of human animals. Moreover, if brain death is the correct criterion (...)
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  38. The individual in biology and psychology.Robert A. Wilson - 1999 - In Valerie Gray Hardcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Psychology. MIT Press. pp. 355--374.
    Individual organisms are obvious enough kinds of things to have been taken for granted as the entities that have many commonly attributed biological and psychological properties, both in common sense and in science. The sorts of morphological properties used by the folk to categorize individual animals and plants into common sense kinds (that's a dog; that's a rose), as well as the properties that feature as parts of phenotypes, are properties of individual organisms. And psychological properties, such as believing (...)
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  39. Integrating neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology through a teleological conception of function.Jennifer Mundale & William Bechtel - 1996 - Minds and Machines 6 (4):481-505.
    The idea of integrating evolutionary biology and psychology has great promise, but one that will be compromised if psychological functions are conceived too abstractly and neuroscience is not allowed to play a contructive role. We argue that the proper integration of neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology requires a telelogical as opposed to a merely componential analysis of function. A teleological analysis is required in neuroscience itself; we point to traditional and curent research methods in neuroscience, which make critical (...)
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  40.  48
    Where Biology Meets Psychology: Philosophical Essays.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1999 - MIT Press. Edited by Valerie Gray Hardcastle.
    This book is perhaps the first to open a dialogue between the two disciplines.
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  41. Psychological hedonism, evolutionary biology, and the experience machine.John Lemos - 2004 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (4):506-526.
    In the second half of their recent, critically acclaimed book Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior , Elliott Sober and David Sloan Wilson discuss psychological hedonism. This is the view that avoiding our own pain and increasing our own pleasure are the only ultimate motives people have. They argue that none of the traditional philosophical arguments against this view are good, and they go on to present theirownevolutionary biological argument against it. Interestingly, the first half (...)
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  42. Psychological vs. biological explanations of behavior.Fred Dretske - 2004 - Behavior and Philosophy 32 (1):167-177.
    Causal explanations of behavior must distinguish two kinds of cause. There are triggering causes, the events or conditions that come before the effect and are followed regularly by the effect, and structuring causes, events that cause a triggering cause to produce its effect. Moving the mouse is the triggering cause of cursor movement; hardware and programming conditions are the structuring causes of cursor movement. I use this distinction to show how representational facts can be structuring causes of behavior even though (...)
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  43. Biological thinking in evolutionary psychology: Rockbottom or quicksand?Huib de JongLooren & Wim J. van der Steen - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):183-205.
     
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  44.  12
    Where Biology Meets Psychology.Valerie Gray Hardcastle (ed.) - 1999 - MIT Press.
    A great deal of interest and excitement surround the interface between the philosophy of biology and the philosophy of psychology, yet the area is neither well defined nor well represented in mainstream philosophical publications. This book is perhaps the first to open a dialogue between the two disciplines. Its aim is to broaden the traditional subject matter of the philosophy of biology while informing the philosophy of psychology of relevant biological constraints and insights.The book is organized around (...)
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  45. Charles E. Raven, The Creator Spirit: A Survey of Christian Doctrine in the Light of Biology, Psychology and Mysticism. [REVIEW]A. Barratt Brown - 1927 - Hibbert Journal 26:376.
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  46.  35
    Québec Studies in the Philosophy of Science Part 1: Logic, Mathematics, Physics and History of Science Part 2: Biology, Psychology, Cognitive Science and Economics Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vols. 177 and 178 Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, editors Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publisher, 1995–96, vol. 1: xi + 320 pp., $180; vol. 2: xi +303 pp., $154. [REVIEW]James Robert Brown - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (3):620.
  47. Functions: New Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology and Biology.André Ariew, Robert Cummins & Mark Perlman (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  48.  9
    Psychological and Biological Approaches to Personal Identity and How They Pertain to Moral Responsibility. 이희열 - 2017 - Journal of the New Korean Philosophical Association 87:423-446.
    본 논문은 현대 개인동일성 이론의 주류를 점하고 있는 심리주의와 생체주의의 개인동일성 규준을 명확히 하고, 이를 중심으로 개인동일성이 도덕적 책임 귀속의 필요조건인지 여부를 탐색한다. 심리주의는 우리가 특정한 종류의 심리적 특성을 유지함으로써 존속한다고 본다. 본 논문은 로크의 기억이론과 파핏-슈메이커류의 신(新)로크주의를 검토하면서 심리주의의 핵심주장을 분명히 한다. 특히 심리적 연결과 심리적 연속성의 개념을 명료히 함으로써 심리주의는 심리적 연속성을 개인동일성의 필요충분조건으로 간주한다는 점을 밝힌다. 한편 생체주의는 우리가 인간유기체의 종적 특성을 보존함으로써 존속한다고 본다. 본 논문은 생리적 연속성의 개념적 분석을 통해 생체주의는 생리적 연속성을 개인동일성의 필요충분조건으로 간주한다는 (...)
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  49. Mathieu Marion and Robert S. Cohen, eds., Quebec Studies in the Philosophy of Science Part II: Biology, Psychology, Cognitive Science and Economics. [REVIEW]Valerie Hardcastle - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:52-54.
  50.  49
    Folk Psychology and the Biological Basis of Intersubjectivity.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 56:18-19.
    Recent philosophical discussions of intersubjectivity generally start by stating or assuming that our ability to understand and interact with others is enabled by a ‘folk psychology’ or ‘theory of mind’. Folk psychology is characterized as the ability to attribute intentional states, such as beliefs and desires, to others, in order to predict and explain their behaviour. Many authors claim that this ability is not merely one amongst many constituents of interpersonal understanding but an underlying core that enables social (...)
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