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Beverley Townsend [4]Beverley A. Townsend [1]
  1. Future of global regulation of human genome editing: a South African perspective on the WHO Draft Governance Framework on Human Genome Editing.Bonginkosi Shozi, Tamanda Kamwendo, Julian Kinderlerer, Donrich W. Thaldar, Beverley Townsend & Marietjie Botes - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (3):165-168.
    WHO in 2019 established the Advisory Committee on Developing Global Standards for Governance and Oversight of Human Genome Editing, which has recently published a Draft Governance Framework on Human Genome Editing. Although the Draft Framework is a good point of departure, there are four areas of concern: first, it does not sufficiently address issues related to establishing safety and efficacy. Second, issues that are a source of tension between global standard setting and state sovereignty need to be addressed in a (...)
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    Human genome editing: how to prevent rogue actors.Beverley A. Townsend - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundHuman genome editing technologies offer much potential benefit. However, central to any conversation relating to the application of such technologies are certain ethical, legal, and social difficulties around their application. The recent misuse, or inappropriate use, by certain Chinese actors of the application of genome editing technologies has been, of late, well noted and described. Consequently, caution is expressed by various policy experts, scientists, bioethicists, and members of the public with regard to the appropriate use of human germline genome editing (...)
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    From Pluralistic Normative Principles to Autonomous-Agent Rules.Beverley Townsend, Colin Paterson, T. T. Arvind, Gabriel Nemirovsky, Radu Calinescu, Ana Cavalcanti, Ibrahim Habli & Alan Thomas - 2022 - Minds and Machines 1:1-33.
    With recent advancements in systems engineering and artificial intelligence, autonomous agents are increasingly being called upon to execute tasks that have normative relevance. These are tasks that directly—and potentially adversely—affect human well-being and demand of the agent a degree of normative-sensitivity and -compliance. Such norms and normative principles are typically of a social, legal, ethical, empathetic, or cultural nature. Whereas norms of this type are often framed in the abstract, or as high-level principles, addressing normative concerns in concrete applications of (...)
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    From Pluralistic Normative Principles to Autonomous-Agent Rules.Beverley Townsend, Colin Paterson, T. T. Arvind, Gabriel Nemirovsky, Radu Calinescu, Ana Cavalcanti, Ibrahim Habli & Alan Thomas - 2022 - Minds and Machines 32 (4):683-715.
    With recent advancements in systems engineering and artificial intelligence, autonomous agents are increasingly being called upon to execute tasks that have normative relevance. These are tasks that directly—and potentially adversely—affect human well-being and demand of the agent a degree of normative-sensitivity and -compliance. Such norms and normative principles are typically of a social, legal, ethical, empathetic, or cultural (‘SLEEC’) nature. Whereas norms of this type are often framed in the abstract, or as high-level principles, addressing normative concerns in concrete applications (...)
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    Legal and ethical principles governing the use of artificial intelligence in radiology services in South Africa.Irvine Sihlahla, Dusty-Lee Donnelly, Beverley Townsend & Donrich Thaldar - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) will drastically change the healthcare system. Radiology is one speciality that is most affected as AI algorithms are increasingly used in diagnostic imaging. AI‐enhanced health technologies will, inter alia, increase workflow efficiency, improve diagnostic accuracy, reduce healthcare‐related costs, and help alleviate medical personnel shortages in under‐resourced settings. However, the development of AI‐enhanced technologies in healthcare is fraught with legal, ethical, and human rights concerns. Currently, the use of AI in South African healthcare is not governed by sui (...)
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