Results for 'Bernard Koenig'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  10
    Art Matters: Art of Knowledge/Knowledge of Art.Bernard Koenig - 2009 - Academica Press.
    A comprehensive overview of art criticism as it relates to art value and aesthetics argues that art can impart insights into the natural and human world in ways akin to those of philosophy and science. Reprint.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  31
    Book Review:Jews in a Gentile World: The Problem of Anti-Semitism. Isacque Graeber, Steuart Henderson Britt, Miriam Beard, Jessie Bernard, Leonard Bloom, J. F. Brown, Joseph W. Cohen, Carleton Stevens Coons, Ellis Freeman, Carl J. Friedrich, J. O. Hertzler, Melville Jacobs, Raymond Kennedy, Samuel Koenig, Jacob Lestchinsky, Carl Mayer, Talcott Parsons, Everett V. Stonequist. [REVIEW]Helen MacGill Hughes - 1944 - Ethics 54 (4):303-.
  3. Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973–1980.Bernard Williams - 1981 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    A new volume of philosophical essays by Bernard Williams. The book is a successor to Problems of the Self, but whereas that volume dealt mainly with questions of personal identity, Moral Luck centres on questions of moral philosophy and the theory of rational action. That whole area has of course been strikingly reinvigorated over the last deacde, and philosophers have both broadened and deepened their concerns in a way that now makes much earlier moral and political philosophy look sterile (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   379 citations  
  4. Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2002 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    "In this exceptionally brilliant book, ranging effortlessly from Herodotus and Thucydides to Diderot and Nietzsche, Bernard Williams daringly asks--and still more daringly answers--one of the central questions of philosophy: what is the ...
  5. Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.Bernard Williams - 2006 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline, Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why Williams was one (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   146 citations  
  6. Shame and Necessity.Bernard Arthur Owen Williams - 1992 - University of California Press.
    We tend to suppose that the ancient Greeks had primitive ideas of the self, of responsibility, freedom, and shame, and that now humanity has advanced from these to a more refined moral consciousness. Bernard Williams's original and radical book questions this picture of Western history. While we are in many ways different from the Greeks, Williams claims that the differences are not to be traced to a shift in these basic conceptions of ethical life. We are more like the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   144 citations  
  7. Internal and External Reasons.Bernard Williams - 1979 - In Ross Harrison (ed.), Rational action: studies in philosophy and social science. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 101-113.
  8. Philosophy as a humanistic discipline.Bernard Williams - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (4):477-496.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline , Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why Williams was (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   108 citations  
  9. Persons, Character, and Morality.Bernard Williams - 1976 - In James Rachels (ed.), Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973–1980. Cambridge University Press.
  10.  10
    Conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics.Bernard D' Espagnat - 1971 - Redwood City, Calif.: Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program.
    Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Mechanics provides a detailed view of the conceptual foundations and problems of quantum physics, and a clear and comprehensive account of the fundamental physical implications of the quantum formalism. This book deals with nonseparability, hidden variable theories, measurement theories and several related problems. Mathematical arguments are presented with an emphasis on simple but adequately representative cases. The conclusion incorporates a description of a set of relationships and concepts that could compose a legitimate view of the world.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  11. Moral Luck.Bernard Williams - 1981 - Critica 17 (51):101-105.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   426 citations  
  12. Problems of the Self.Bernard Williams - 1973 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 37 (3):551-551.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   379 citations  
  13.  67
    Shame and Necessity.Bernard Arthur Owen Williams - 1994 - Ethics 105 (1):178-181.
    We tend to suppose that the ancient Greeks had primitive ideas of the self, of responsibility, freedom, and shame, and that now humanity has advanced from these to a more refined moral consciousness. Bernard Williams's original and radical book questions this picture of Western history. While we are in many ways different from the Greeks, Williams claims that the differences are not to be traced to a shift in these basic conceptions of ethical life. We are more like the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   123 citations  
  14. Truth and Truthfulness An Essay in Genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2002 - Philosophy 78 (305):411-414.
  15. The self and the future.Bernard Williams - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (2):161-180.
  16. Persons, Character, and Morality.Bernard Williams - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press UK.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   208 citations  
  17.  41
    Accounting for Culture in Globalized Bioethics.Patricia Marshall & Barbara Koenig - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):252-266.
    As we look to the future in a world with porous borders and boundaries transgressed by technologies, an inevitable question is:Can there be a single, global bioethics? Intimately intertwined with this question is a second one: How might a global bioethics account for profound - and constantly transforming - sources of cultural difference? Can a uniform, global bioethics be relevant cross-culturally? These are not simple questions, rather, a multi-dimensional answer is required. It is important to distinguish between two meanings of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  18. Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):343-352.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   184 citations  
  19.  37
    Accounting for Culture in a Globalized Bioethics.Patricia Marshall & Barbara Koenig - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):252-266.
    As we look to the future in a world with porous borders and boundaries transgressed by technologies, an inevitable question is:Can there be a single, global bioethics? Intimately intertwined with this question is a second one: How might a global bioethics account for profound - and constantly transforming - sources of cultural difference? Can a uniform, global bioethics be relevant cross-culturally? These are not simple questions, rather, a multi-dimensional answer is required. It is important to distinguish between two meanings of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  20. Shame and Necessity.Bernard Williams - 1993 - Philosophy 69 (270):507-509.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   176 citations  
  21. Moral Luck. Philosophical Papers 1973-1980.Bernard Williams - 1983 - Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):288-296.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   155 citations  
  22.  86
    The Frankenstein Syndrome: Ethical and Social Issues in the Genetic Engineering of Animals.Bernard E. Rollin - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a philosophically sophisticated and scientifically well-informed discussion of the moral and social issues raised by genetically engineering animals, a powerful technology which has major implications for society. Unlike other books on this emotionally charged subject, the author attempts to inform, not inflame, the reader about the real problems society must address in order to manage this technology. Bernard Rollin is both a professor of philosophy, and physiology and biophysics, and writes from a uniquely well-informed perspective on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  23. Personal Identity and Individuation.Bernard Williams - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:229-252.
  24. An Attributional Theory of Motivation and Emotion.Bernard Weiner - 1988 - Behaviorism 16 (2):167-173.
  25. Must a concern for the environment be centred on human beings.Bernard Williams - 1995 - In Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  26. Morality: An Introduction to Ethics.Bernard Williams - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):469-473.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   79 citations  
  27.  45
    Left-Wing Wittgenstein.Bernard Williams - 2019 - Common Knowledge 25 (1-3):321-331.
    Writing in the wake of the breakup of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, the moral philosopher Bernard Williams considers the opposing claims of Rawlsian liberalism, with its emphasis on pluralism and procedural fairness, and communitarianism, which instead promotes more or less culturally homogeneous societies formed around shared values. Williams shares the communitarians’ critique of Rawls’s theory as excessively abstract, questioning whether a rational commitment to pluralism as the most just social arrangement can serve as a sufficiently binding social force. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28. 1. Toleration: An Impossible Virtue?Bernard Williams - 1996 - In David Heyd (ed.), Toleration: An Elusive Virtue. Princeton University Press. pp. 18-27.
  29.  47
    The Sense of the Past: Essays in the History of Philosophy.Bernard Williams - 2006 - Princeton: Princeton University Press. Edited by Myles Burnyeat.
    These twenty-five essays span from ancient philosophy to Wittgenstein and express Williams’s conviction that studying the history of philosophy is an essential part of philosophy. Williams distinguishes a historical approach , which is focused on the context of a historical text and aims at the question of why some theory came up, from doing “history of philosophy,” aiming at a contribution to current philosophical debates by denying transhistorical identity and making use of the “alienation effect.”.
  30. The Philosophy of Claude Lefort. Interpreting the Political.Bernard Flynn - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (4):835-837.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  31. Justice as a Virtue.Bernard Williams - 1980 - In Amélie Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 189--200.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  32. Wittgenstein and idealism.Bernard Williams - 1981 - In Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973–1980. Cambridge University Press. pp. 144-164.
  33.  71
    Blacks and Social Justice.Bernard R. Boxill - 1984 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    From Bernard Boxill, professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and editor of Race and Racism, comes a tightly-argued, very illuminating book that will be essential reading for anyone interested in ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  34. How Free Does the Will Need to Be?Bernard Williams - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1985, given by Bernard Williams, a British philosopher.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  35. From Freedom to Liberty: The Construction of a Political Value.Bernard Williams - 2001 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (1):3-26.
  36.  54
    Consistency and Realism.Bernard A. O. Williams - 1966 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 40 (1):1-22.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  37. Practical necessity.Bernard Williams - 1982 - In Donald MacKenzie MacKinnon, Brian Hebblethwaite & Stewart R. Sutherland (eds.), The Philosophical Frontiers of Christian Theology: Essays Presented to D.M. Mackinnon. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  38.  13
    Viii Persons, Character and Morality.Bernard Williams - 1976 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Identities of Persons. University of California Press. pp. 197-216.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  39. Life as narrative.Bernard Williams - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):305-314.
  40.  22
    Wittgenstein and Idealism.Bernard Williams - 1973 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 7:76-95.
    Tractatus, 5.62 famously says: ‘… what the solipsist means is quite correct; only it cannot be said but makes itself manifest. The world is my world: this is manifest in the fact that the limits of language mean the limits of my world.’ The later part of this repeats what was said in summary at 5.6: ‘the limits of my language mean the limits of my world’. And the key to the problem ‘how much truth there is in solipsism’ has (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  41. Hylomorphism.Bernard Williams - 1986 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 4:189-99.
  42.  62
    Relation of General Deviance to Academic Dishonesty.Bernard E. Whitley & Kevin L. Blankenship - 2000 - Ethics and Behavior 10 (1):1-12.
    This study investigated the relations of cheating on an exam and using a false excuse to avoid taking an exam as scheduled to various forms of minor deviance. College students completed measures of cheating, false excuse making, and minor deviance. A factor analysis identified clusters of deviance behaviors. Cheaters scored higher than noncheaters on measures of unreliability and risky driving behaviors, and false excuse makers scored higher than other students on measures of substance use, risky driving, illegal behaviors, and personal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  43. Acting as the virtuous person acts.Bernard Williams - 1995 - In Robert Heinaman (ed.), Aristotle and Moral Realism. Westview Press. pp. 13--23.
  44.  18
    An Essay on Collingwood.Bernard Williams - 2018 - In Karim Dharamsi, Giuseppina D'Oro & Stephen Leach (eds.), Collingwood on Philosophical Methodology. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 15-34.
    Collingwood’s account of re-enactment is often misunderstood as providing methodological guidance to historians. Williams’s chapter is perceptive in seeing through this erroneous interpretation. Williams is however very critical of Collingwood’s account of the relationship between philosophy and history. He reads Collingwood’s account of absolute presuppositions as embracing a form of ‘radical historicism’ and argues that, like many other philosophers who reject foundationalism, Collingwood tends to use the word ‘we’ in an evasive way, both in an inclusive sense “as implying universalistic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45. Naturalism and genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2000 - In Edward Harcourt (ed.), Morality, Reflection, and Ideology. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  46. Ethics and the Fabric of the World.Bernard Williams - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 1: The Question of Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  47.  97
    Who Needs Ethical Knowledge?Bernard Williams - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:213-222.
    An old question, still much discussed in moral philosophy, is whether there is any ethical knowledge. It is closely related, by simple etymology, to the question of cognitivism in ethics. Despite the fact that the terms ‘cognitivism’ and ‘objectivism’ seem sometimes to be used interchangeably, I take it that the question whether there can be ethical knowledge is not the same as the question whether ethical outlooks can be objective. A sufficient reason for this is that an ethical outlook might (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  48. New Arguments that Philosophers don't Treat Intuitions as Evidence.Bernard Molyneux - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (3):441-461.
    According to orthodox views of philosophical methodology, when philosophers appeal to intuitions, they treat them as evidence for their contents. Call this “descriptive evidentialism.” Descriptive evidentialism is assumed both by those who defend the epistemic status of intuitions and by those, including many experimental philosophers, who criticize it. This article shows, however, that the idea that philosophers treat intuitions as evidence struggles to account for the way philosophers treat intuitions in a variety of philosophical contexts. In particular, it cannot account (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  49. A mistrustful animal.Bernard Williams - 2009 - In Alex Voorhoeve (ed.), Conversations on ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50. Plato.Bernard Williams - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000