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Bernard R. Goldstein [72]Bernard Goldstein [23]
  1.  87
    Realism and instrumentalism in sixteenth century astronomy: A reappraisal.Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1998 - Perspectives on Science 6 (3):232-258.
    : We question the claim, common since Duhem, that sixteenth century astronomy, and especially the Wittenberg interpretation of Copernicus, was instrumentalistic rather than realistic. We identify a previously unrecognized Wittenberg astronomer, Edo Hildericus (Hilderich von Varel), who presents a detailed exposition of Copernicus's cosmology that is incompatible with instrumentalism. Quotations from other sixteenth century astronomers show that knowledge of the real configuration of the heavens was unattainable practically, rather than in principle. Astronomy was limited to quia demonstrations, although demonstration propter (...)
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  2.  21
    The Arabic Version of Ptolemy's Planetary Hypotheses.G. J. Toomer & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1970 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 90 (2):296.
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  3.  33
    Is Seventeenth Century Physics Indebted to the Stoics?Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1984 - Centaurus 27 (2):148-164.
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  4.  23
    Distance and velocity in Kepler's astronomy.Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (1):59-73.
    We will examine Kepler's use of a relation between velocity and distance from a centre of circular motion. This relation plays an essential role, through a derivation in chapter 40 of the Astronomia Nova, in the presentation of the Area Law of planetary motion. Kepler transcends ancient and contemporary applications of the distance-velocity relation by connecting it with his metaphysical commitment to the causal role of the Sun. His second main innovation is to replace the astronomical models of his predecessors (...)
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  5.  32
    Maxwell’s contrived analogy: An early version of the methodology of modeling.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 43 (4):236-257.
    The term “analogy” stands for a variety of methodological practices all related in one way or another to the idea of proportionality. We claim that in his first substantial contribution to electromagnetism James Clerk Maxwell developed a methodology of analogy which was completely new at the time or, to borrow John North’s expression, Maxwell’s methodology was a “newly contrived analogue”. In his initial response to Michael Faraday’s experimental researches in electromagnetism, Maxwell did not seek an analogy with some physical system (...)
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  6.  51
    Kepler's Move from Orbs to Orbits: Documenting a Revolutionary Scientific Concept.Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon - 2005 - Perspectives on Science 13 (1):74-111.
    This study of the concept of orbit is intended to throw light on the nature of revolutionary concepts in science. We observe that Kepler transformed theoretical astronomy that was understood in terms of orbs [Latin: orbes] and models , by introducing a single term, orbit [Latin: orbita], that is, the path of a planet in space resulting from the action of physical causes expressed in laws of nature. To demonstrate the claim that orbit is a revolutionary concept we pursue three (...)
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  7.  8
    Ibn al-Kammād’s Muqtabis zij and the astronomical tradition of Indian origin in the Iberian Peninsula.Bernard R. Goldstein & José Chabás - 2015 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 69 (6):577-650.
    In this paper, we analyze the astronomical tables in al-Zīj al-Muqtabis by Ibn al-Kammād (early twelfth century, Córdoba), based on the Latin and Hebrew versions of the lost Arabic original, each of which is extant in a unique manuscript. We present excerpts of many tables and pay careful attention to their structure and underlying parameters. The main focus, however, is on the impact al-Muqtabis had on the astronomy that developed in the Iberian Peninsula and the Maghrib and, more generally, on (...)
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  8.  22
    A New View Of Early Greek Astronomy.Bernard Goldstein & Alan Bowen - 1983 - Isis 74:330-340.
  9.  30
    The role of Rothmann in the dissolution of the celestial spheres.Bernard Goldstein & Peter Barker - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (4):385-403.
    At the end of the sixteenth century astronomers and others felt compelled to choose among different cosmologies. For Tycho Brahe, who played a central role in these debates, the intersection of the spheres of Mars and the Sun was an outstanding problem that had to be resolved before he made his choice. His ultimate solution was to eliminate celestial spheres in favour of fluid heavens, a crucial step in the abandonment of the Ptolemaic system and the demise of Aristotelian celestial (...)
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  10.  6
    Levi ben Gerson's Theory of Planetary Distances.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1986 - Centaurus 29 (4):272-313.
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  11.  17
    Theory and Observation in Medieval Astronomy.Bernard Goldstein - 1972 - Isis 63 (1):39-47.
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  12.  24
    From proportion to balance: the background to symmetry in science.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):1-21.
    We call attention to the historical fact that the meaning of symmetry in antiquity—as it appears in Vitruvius’s De architectura—is entirely different from the modern concept. This leads us to the question, what is the evidence for the changes in the meaning of the term symmetry, and what were the different meanings attached to it? We show that the meaning of the term in an aesthetic sense gradually shifted in the context of architecture before the image of the balance was (...)
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  13.  18
    A New View of Early Greek Astronomy.Bernard R. Goldstein & Alan C. Bowen - 1983 - Isis 74 (3):330-340.
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  14.  16
    How Einstein Made Asymmetry Disappear: Symmetry and Relativity in 1905.Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon - 2005 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 59 (5):437-544.
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  15.  12
    On the Theory of Trepidation.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1965 - Centaurus 10 (4):232-247.
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  16.  5
    Maxwell's role in turning the concept of model into the methodology of modeling.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88 (C):321-333.
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  17.  52
    Kepler's move from.Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon - 2005 - Perspectives on Science 13 (1):74-111.
    : This study of the concept of orbit is intended to throw light on the nature of revolutionary concepts in science. We observe that Kepler transformed theoretical astronomy that was understood in terms of orbs [Latin: orbes] (spherical shells to which the planets were attached) and models (called hypotheses at the time), by introducing a single term, orbit [Latin: orbita], that is, the path of a planet in space resulting from the action of physical causes expressed in laws of nature. (...)
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  18.  13
    Some Medieval Reports of Venus and Mercury Transits.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1969 - Centaurus 14 (1):49-59.
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  19.  7
    An Anonymous Zij in Hebrew for 1400 A.D.: A Preliminary Report.Bernard R. Goldstein - 2003 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 57 (2):151-171.
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  20.  5
    The Hebrew Astronomical Tradition: New Sources.Bernard Goldstein - 1981 - Isis 72:237-251.
  21.  7
    The Hebrew Astronomical Tradition: New Sources.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1981 - Isis 72 (2):237-251.
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  22. The physical astronomy of Levi ben Gerson.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1997 - Perspectives on Science 5 (1):1-30.
    Levi ben Gerson was a medieval astronomer who responded in an unusual way to the Ptolemaic tradition. He significantly modified Ptolemy’s lunar and planetary theories, in part by appealing to physical reasoning. Moreover, he depended on his own observations, with instruments he invented, rather than on observations he found in literary sources. As a result of his close attention to the variation in apparent planetary sizes, a subject entirely absent from the Almagest, he discovered a new phenomenon of Mars and (...)
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  23.  7
    Levi ben Gerson's Preliminary Lunar Model.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1974 - Centaurus 18 (4):275-288.
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  24.  9
    The introduction of dated observations and precise measurement in Greek astronomy.Bernard R. Goldstein & Alan C. Bowen - 1991 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 43 (2):93-132.
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  25.  47
    Unpacking "For Reasons of Symmetry": Two Categories of Symmetry Arguments.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (4):419-439.
    Hermann Weyl succeeded in presenting a consistent overarching analysis that accounts for symmetry in material artifacts, natural phenomena, and physical theories. Weyl showed that group theory is the underlying mathematical structure for symmetry in all three domains. But in this study Weyl did not include appeals to symmetry arguments which, for example, Einstein expressed as “for reasons of symmetry”. An argument typically takes the form of a set of premises and rules of inference that lead to a conclusion. Symmetry may (...)
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  26.  12
    Legendre’s Revolution (1794): The Definition of Symmetry in Solid Geometry.Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon - 2005 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 59 (2):107-155.
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  27.  9
    Ptolemy, Bianchini, and Copernicus: Tables for Planetary Latitudes.José Chabás & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2004 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 58 (5):453-473.
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  28.  34
    Astronomy and Astrology in the Works of Abraham ibn Ezra.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1996 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 6 (1):9-21.
    Abraham ibn Ezra d'Espagne (m. 1167) fut l'un des plus importants savants ayant contribué à la transmission de la science arabe à l'Occident. Ses ouvrages en astrologie et en astronomie, rédigés en hébreu puis traduits en latin, étaient considéréd comme faisant autorité par de nombreux savants juifs et Chrétiens. Parmi les ouvrages qu'il a traduits de l'arabe en hébreu, certains sont perdus dans leur langue originale et ses propres ouvrages renferment certaines informations concernant des sources anciennes mal ou pas du (...)
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  29.  20
    Ibn al-Kamm'd's Star List.Bernard R. Goldstein & JOSÉ CHABÁS - 1996 - Centaurus 38 (4):317-334.
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  30.  9
    Levi ben Gerson's Lunar Model.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1972 - Centaurus 16 (4):257-284.
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  31.  12
    Planetary Distances and Sizes in an Anonymous Arabic Treatise Preserved in Bodleian Ms. Marsh 621.Bernard R. Goldstein & Noel Swerdlow - 1971 - Centaurus 15 (2):135-170.
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  32.  9
    Star Lists in Hebrew.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1985 - Centaurus 28 (3):185-208.
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  33.  11
    The Medieval Hebrew Tradition in Astronomy.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (2):145-148.
  34.  17
    Analysis of the astronomical tables for 1340 compiled by Immanuel ben Jacob Bonfils.José Chabás & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2017 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 71 (1):71-108.
    In this paper, we analyze the astronomical tables for 1340 by Immanuel ben Jacob Bonfils who flourished 1340–1365, based on four Hebrew manuscripts. We discuss the relation of these tables principally with those of al-Battānī, Abraham Bar Ḥiyya, and Levi ben Gerson, as well as with Bonfils’s better known tables, called Six Wings. An unusual feature of this set of tables is that there are two kinds of mean motion tables, one arranged for Julian years from 1340 to 1380, months, (...)
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  35.  16
    Tables for the radii of the Sun, the Moon, and the shadow from John of Gmunden to Longomontanus.Bernard R. Goldstein & José Chabás - 2024 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 78 (1):67-86.
    A table in five columns for the radii of the Sun, the Moon, and the shadow is included in sets of astronomical tables from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth century, specifically in those by John of Gmunden (d. 1442), Peurbach (d. 1461), the second edition of the Alfonsine Tables (1492), Copernicus (d. 1543), Brahe (d. 1601), and Longomontanus (d. 1647). The arrangement is the same and the entries did not change much, despite many innovations in astronomical theories in this (...)
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  36. What Keeps the Earth in Its Place? The Concept of Stability in Plato and Aristotle.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2008 - Centaurus 50 (4):305-323.
  37.  19
    Maxwell’s Methodological Odyssey in Electromagnetism.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - unknown
    In addition to his scientific achievements, James Clerk Maxwell was an innovator in methodologies in physics. In fact, in his hands methodology and theory mutually inform one another, an aspect of his work that has not been properly appreciated. We examine closely from a methodological perspective Maxwell’s contributions to electromagnetism and uncover a trajectory of great interest, which we call Maxwell’s methodological odyssey. There are four principal stations along the fifteen-year trajectory of Maxwell’s published writings devoted to electromagnetism. These contributions (...)
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  38. In Pursuit of Conceptual Change: the Case of Legendre and Symmetry.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2009 - Centaurus 51 (4):288-293.
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  39. What's New in Kepler's New Astronomy?Bernard Goldstein - 1997 - In John Earman & John D. Norton (eds.), The Cosmos of Science: Essays of Exploration. University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 3-23.
  40.  18
    On Early Hellenistic Astronomy: Timocharis and the First Callippic Calendar.Bernard R. Goldstein & Alan C. Bowen - 1989 - Centaurus 32 (3):272-293.
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  41.  4
    Displaced tables in Latin: the Tables for the Seven Planets for 1340.Bernard R. Goldstein & José Chabás - 2013 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 67 (1):1-42.
    The anonymous set of astronomical tables preserved in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS lat. 10262, is the first set of displaced tables to be found in a medieval Latin text. These tables are a reworking of the standard Alfonsine tables and yield the same results. However, the mean motions are defined differently, the presentation of the tables is unprecedented, and some new functions are introduced for computing true planetary longitudes. The absence of any instructions as well as unusual technical (...)
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  42.  12
    Joseph Ibn Waqār and the treatment of retrograde motion in the middle ages.Bernard R. Goldstein & José Chabás - 2023 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 77 (2):175-199.
    In this article, we report the discovery of a new type of astronomical almanac by Joseph Ibn Waqār (Córdoba, fourteenth century) that begins at second station for each of the planets and may have been intended to serve as a template for planetary positions beginning at any dated second station. For background, we discuss the Ptolemaic tradition of treating stations and retrograde motions as well as two tables in Arabic zijes for the anomalistic cycles of the planets in which the (...)
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  43.  10
    New evidence on Abraham Zacut’s astronomical tables.José Chabás & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2018 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 72 (1):21-62.
    In astronomy Abraham Zacut is best known for the Latin version of his tables, the Almanach Perpetuum, first published in 1496, based on the original Hebrew version that he composed in 1478. These tables for Salamanca, Spain, were analyzed by the authors of this paper in 2000. We now present Zacut’s tables preserved in Latin and Hebrew manuscripts that have not been studied previously, with a concordance of his tables in different sources. Based on a hitherto unnoticed text in a (...)
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  44.  11
    To the Editor.José Chabás & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2004 - Isis 95 (1):98-100.
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  45.  14
    Additional Astrological Almanacs from the Cairo Geniza.Bernard Goldstein & David Pingree - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (4):673-690.
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  46.  24
    ʿAlī ibn Sulaymān al-Hāshimī, the Book of the Reasons behind Astronomical TablesAli ibn Sulayman al-Hashimi, the Book of the Reasons behind Astronomical Tables.Bernard R. Goldstein, Fuad I. Haddad & E. S. Kennedy - 1984 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 104 (2):392.
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  47.  10
    A Note On The Metonic Cycle.Bernard Goldstein - 1966 - Isis 57:115-116.
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  48.  5
    A Note on the Metonic Cycle.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1966 - Isis 57 (1):115-116.
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  49.  8
    A Treatise on Number Theory from a Tenth Century Arabic Source.Bernard R. Goldstein - 1965 - Centaurus 10 (3):129-134.
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  50.  22
    Commentary 01 on Goldstein 1980.Bernard R. Goldstein - 2008 - Centaurus 50 (1-2):184-188.
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