18 found
Order:
  1. The Nature of Epistemic Trust.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (4):413-430.
    This paper offers an analysis of the nature of epistemic trust. With increased philosophical attention to social epistemology in general and testimony in particular, the role for an epistemic or intellectual version of trust has loomed large in recent debates. But, too often, epistemologists talk about trust without really providing a sustained examination of the concept. After some introductory comments, I begin by addressing various components key to trust simpliciter. In particular, I examine what we might think of when we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  2.  84
    Faith and Trust.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):141-158.
    This paper begins with the oft-repeated claim that having faith involves trust in God. Taking this platitude seriously requires at least two philosophical tasks. First, one must address the relevant notion of “trust” guiding the platitude. I offer a sketch of epistemic trust: arguing that epistemic trust involves several components: acceptance, communication, dependence, and confidence. The first duo concerns the epistemic element of epistemic trust and the second part delimit the fiducial aspect to epistemic trust. Second, one must also examine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  54
    Brutal Truth: Modern(ist) Aesthetics and Death Metal.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2024 - Journal of Aesthethics and Culture 16 (1):1-13.
    Here, I explore a modernist aesthetics of death metal. First, I briefly describe a few themes that characterize some modern art, without any claim that they are necessary, sufficient, or exhaustive. The goal is to obtain a set of themes that might be set against similar themes characteristic of death metal. This is the task in the second half of the paper. In particular, I argue that (some) modernist art and death metal share themes centered on transgressively breaking with the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  46
    Thinking with Others: A Radically Externalist Internalism.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2020 - Acta Analytica 35 (3):351-371.
    This paper is ambitious: it begins with mixing externalism in philosophy of mind with internalism in epistemology, and it ends with instructive insights from social and feminist thought. In the first stage, I argue that one can consistently combine two theses that appear, at first glance, incompatible: cognitive externalism—the thesis that one’s mental states/processing can extend past one’s biological boundaries—and mentalism in epistemology—i.e., that epistemic justification supervenes on one’s mental states. This yields the perhaps startling or strange view that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  17
    Social Epistemology and Epidemiology.Benjamin W. McCraw - forthcoming - Acta Analytica:1-16.
    Recent approaches to the social epistemology of belief formation have appealed to an epidemiological model, on which the mechanisms explaining how we form beliefs from our society or community along the lines of infectious disease. More specifically, Alvin Goldman (2001) proposes an etiology of (social) belief along the lines of an epistemological epidemiology. On this “contagion model,” beliefs are construed as diseases that infect people via some socio-epistemic community. This paper reconsiders Goldman’s epidemiological approach in terms of epistemic trust. By (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  66
    A (Different) Virtue Responsibilism: Epistemic Virtues Without Motivations.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2018 - Acta Analytica 33 (3):311-329.
    Debate rages in virtue epistemology between virtue reliabilists and responsibilists. Here, I develop and argue for a new kind of responsibilism that is more conciliar to reliabilism. First, I argue that competence-based virtue reliabilism cannot adequately ground epistemic credit. Then, with this problem in hand, I show how Aristotle’s virtue theory is motivated by analogous worries. Yet, incorporating too many details of Aristotelian moral theory leads to problems, notably the problem of unmotivated belief. As a result, I suggest a re-turn (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Virtue epistemology, testimony, and trust.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2014 - Logos and Episteme 5 (1):95-102.
    In this paper, I respond to an objection raised by Duncan Pritchard and Jesper Kallestrup against virtue epistemology. In particular, they argue that the virtue epistemologist must either deny that S knows that p only if S believes that p because of S’s virtuous operation or deny that intuitive cases of testimonial knowledge. Their dilemma has roots in the apparent ease by which we obtain testimonial knowledge and, thus, how the virtue epistemologist can explain such knowledge in a way that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  25
    Duncan Pritchard on the Epistemic Value of Truth: Revision or Revolution?Benjamin W. McCraw - 2022 - Philosophia 51 (2):821-833.
    In this paper, I assess Duncan Pritchard’s defense of the “orthodox” view on epistemic normativity. On this view, termed “epistemic value T-monism” (EVTM), only true belief has final value. Pritchard discusses three influential objections to EVTM: the swamping problem, the goal of inquiry problem, and the trivial truths problem. I primarily focus on Pritchard’s defense of the trivial truths problem: truth cannot be the only final epistemic value because we value “trivial” truths less than “significant” truths. In response, Pritchard appeals (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  92
    Recent Objections to Perfect Knowledge and Classical Approaches to Omniscience.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2016 - Philosophy and Theology 28 (1):259-270.
    Patrick Grim and Einar Duenger Bohn have recently argued that there can be no perfectly knowing Being. In particular, they urge that the object of omniscience is logically absurd (Grim) or requires an impossible maximal point of all knowledge (Bohn). I argue that, given a more classical notion of omniscience found in Aquinas and Augustine, we can shift the focus of perfect knowledge from what that being must know to the mode of that being’s understanding. Since Grim and Bohn focus (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  54
    Philosophical Approaches to the Devil.Benjamin W. McCraw & Robert Arp (eds.) - 2015 - New York: Routledge.
    This collection brings together new papers addressing the philosophical challenges that the concept of a Devil presents, bringing philosophical rigor to treatments of the Devil. Contributors approach the idea of the Devil from a variety of philosophical traditions, methodologies, and styles, providing a comprehensive philosophical overview that contemplates the existence, nature, and purpose of the Devil. While some papers take a classical approach to the Devil, drawing on biblical exegesis, other contributors approach the topic of the Devil from epistemological, metaphysical, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  22
    Purgatory: Philosophical Dimensions.Kristof Vanhoutte & Benjamin W. McCraw (eds.) - 2017 - Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book examines the concept of Purgatory. However, in contradistinction to the many monographs and edited volumes published in the past 50 years devoted to historical, cultural, or theological treatments of Purgatory—especially in proportion to the voluminous output on Heaven and Hell—this collection features papers by philosophers and other scholars engaged specifically in philosophical argument, debate, and dialogue involving conceptions of Purgatory and related ideas. It exists to broaden the discussion beyond the prevailing trends in the academic literature and fills (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  20
    Alston, Aristotle, and Epistemic Normativity.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2022 - Logos and Episteme 13 (1):75-92.
    Alston argues that there is no such thing as a single concept of epistemic justification. Instead, there is an irreducible plurality of epistemically valuable features of beliefs: ‘epistemic desiderata.’ I argue that this approach is problematic for meta-epistemological reasons. How, for instance, do we characterize epistemic evaluation and do we do we go about it if there’s no theoretical unity to epistemology? Alston’s response is to ground all epistemic desiderata, thereby unifying epistemology, in truth and truth-conduciveness. I argue that this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  32
    Philosophical Approaches to Demonology.Benjamin W. McCraw & Arp Robert (eds.) - 2017 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    In contradistinction to the many monographs and edited volumes devoted to historical, cultural, or theological treatments of demonology, this collection features newly written papers by philosophers and other scholars engaged specifically in philosophical argument, debate, and dialogue involving ideas and topics in demonology. The contributors to the volume approach the subject from the perspective of the broadest areas of Western philosophy, namely metaphysics, epistemology, logic, and moral philosophy. The collection also features a plurality of religious, cultural, and theological views on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  13
    Adam Morton , Bounded Thinking: Intellectual Virtues for Limited Agents . Reviewed by. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (1-2):59-61.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  25
    Brian Leftow, God and Necessity , ix + 575 pp., £60.00. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2014 - Ratio 28 (1):112-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  34
    Clayton Littlejohn and John Turri, eds., Epistemic Norms: New Essays on Action, Belief, and Assertion. Reviewed by. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (4):204-207.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  25
    Joseph J. Godfrey: Trust of people, words, and God: a route for philosophy of religion: Notre Dame University Press, Notre Dame, 2012, 520 pp, $49.00. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):367-370.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  38
    Laura Frances Callahan and Timothy O’Connor : Religious faith and intellectual virtue: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014, 333 pp, £45.00. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):281-285.
    Let me begin with what I take to be the two most significant features of this collection. First, it addresses an area that is woefully under-discussed: the intersection of virtue epistemology and philosophy of religion. Each is a massively influential and important field in its own right, so bringing the two into dialogue makes tremendous sense. This collection accomplishes much in this regard but also underscores the amount of work that needs to be developed. Bringing together virtue epistemology, philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark