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  1.  32
    Black Mirror and the Divergence of Online and Offline Behavior Patterns.Benjamin Martin - 2018 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 12 (4).
    This essay seeks to show the divergence of real and virtual communication codes by means of analyzing Charlie Brooker’s dystopian series Black Mirror, in respect of the influence of new communication technologies and gadgets in the form of bodily extensions. It draws on both recent sociopolitical phenomena and sociological findings to undermine why and how the speculative fiction of Black Mirror displays the characters’ engagement in their environs as inherently obscene, and at same time mirrors the recent developments that are (...)
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  2.  12
    Internal criteria for scientific choice: An evaluation of research in high-energy physics using electron accelerators.Benjamin R. Martin & John Irvine - 1981 - Minerva 19 (3):408-432.
  3. Neural connections, mental computation.Benjamin Martin - 1993 - Artificial Intelligence 62 (1):141-151.
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  4.  32
    Political justice in France: The Dreyfus affair and after.Benjamin F. Martin - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (5):809-826.
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    Ethical pause as a framework for high-value care of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.Benjamin J. Martin, Margaret Plews-Ogan & Andrew S. Parsons - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (1):1-4.
    Caring for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 raises ethical dilemmas in which clinicians must weigh the unknown value of an intervention against the unknown risk of viral transmission. Current guidelines for delivering high-value care in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic do not directly address ethical dilemmas that arise from the unique concerns of individual patients. We propose an “ethical pause” in which clinicians address ethical dilemmas by taking time to ask three questions that invoke the major bioethical principles of beneficence, (...)
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