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  1.  9
    Spatial and Linguistic Aspects of Visual Imagery in Sentence Comprehension.Benjamin K. Bergen, Shane Lindsay, Teenie Matlock & Srini Narayanan - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (5):733-764.
    There is mounting evidence that language comprehension involves the activation of mental imagery of the content of utterances (Barsalou, 1999; Bergen, Chang, & Narayan, 2004; Bergen, Narayan, & Feldman, 2003; Narayan, Bergen, & Weinberg, 2004; Richardson, Spivey, McRae, & Barsalou, 2003; Stanfield & Zwaan, 2001; Zwaan, Stanfield, & Yaxley, 2002). This imagery can have motor or perceptual content. Three main questions about the process remain under‐explored, however. First, are lexical associations with perception or motion sufficient to yield mental simulation, or (...)
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  2.  16
    Disentangling Spatial Metaphors for Time Using Non-spatial Responses and Auditory Stimuli.Esther J. Walker, Benjamin K. Bergen & Rafael Núñez - 2014 - Metaphor and Symbol 29 (4):316-327.
    While we often talk about time using spatial terms, experimental investigation of space-time associations has focused primarily on the space in front of the participant. This has had two consequences: the disregard of the space behind the participant and the creation of potential task demands produced by spatialized manual button-presses. We introduce and test a new paradigm that uses auditory stimuli and vocal responses to address these issues. Participants made temporal judgments about deictic or sequential relationships presented auditorily along a (...)
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  3.  29
    Do Metaphors Move From Mind to Mouth? Evidence From a New System of Linguistic Metaphors for Time.Rose K. Hendricks, Benjamin K. Bergen & Tyler Marghetis - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):2950-2975.
    Languages around the world use a recurring strategy to discuss abstract concepts: describe them metaphorically, borrowing language from more concrete domains. We “plan ahead” to the future, “count up” to higher numbers, and “warm” to new friends. Past work has found that these ways of talking have implications for how we think, so that shared systems of linguistic metaphors can produce shared conceptualizations. On the other hand, these systematic linguistic metaphors might not just be the cause but also the effect (...)
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  4.  9
    Grammatical aspect, gesture, and conceptualization: Using co-speech gesture to reveal event representations.Fey Parrill, Benjamin K. Bergen & Patricia V. Lichtenstein - 2013 - Cognitive Linguistics 24 (1).
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  5.  24
    One word at a time: Mental representations of object shape change incrementally during sentence processing.Manami Sato, Amy J. Schafer & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2013 - Language and Cognition 5 (4):345-373.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Language and Cognition - An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language and Cognitive Science Jahrgang: 5 Heft: 4 Seiten: 345-373.
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  6.  48
    The case of the missing pronouns: Does mentally simulated perspective play a functional role in the comprehension of person?Manami Sato & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):361-374.
  7.  26
    Action verbs are processed differently in metaphorical and literal sentences depending on the semantic match of visual primes.Melissa Troyer, Lauren B. Curley, Luke E. Miller, Ayse P. Saygin & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  8.  13
    The convergent evolution of radial constructions: French and English deictics and existentials.Benjamin K. Bergen & Madelaine C. Plauché - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (1):1-42.
    English deictic and existential there-constructions have been analyzed as constituting a single radial category of form—meaning pairings, related through motivated links, such as metaphor (Lakoff 1987). By comparison, existentials and deictic demonstratives in French make use of two distinct radial categories. The current study analyzes the varied senses of French deictic demonstratives (voilà ‘there is’ and voici ‘here is’) and the existential (il y a ‘there is’). We argue that the syntactic behavior of each of their senses is best explained (...)
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  9. Language-Driven Motor Simulation is Sensitive to Social Context.Heeyeon Y. Dennison & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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