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  1.  16
    Doctors’ perceptions of how resource limitations relate to futility in end-of-life decision making: a qualitative analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic (...)
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  2.  6
    Junior doctors and conscientious objection to voluntary assisted dying: ethical complexity in practice.Rosalind J. McDougall, Ben P. White, Danielle Ko, Louise Keogh & Lindy Willmott - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):517-521.
    In jurisdictions where voluntary assisted dying is legal, eligibility assessments, prescription and administration of a VAD substance are commonly performed by senior doctors. Junior doctors’ involvement is limited to a range of more peripheral aspects of patient care relating to VAD. In the Australian state of Victoria, where VAD has been legal since June 2019, all health professionals have a right under the legislation to conscientiously object to involvement in the VAD process, including provision of information about VAD. While this (...)
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  3.  2
    Balancing Patient and Societal Interests in Decisions About Potentially Life-Sustaining Treatment: An Australian Policy Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White & Lindy Willmott - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):407-421.
    BackgroundThis paper investigates the content of Australian policies that address withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment to analyse the guidance they provide to doctors about the allocation of resources.MethodsAll publicly available non-institutional policies on withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment were identified, including codes of conduct and government and professional organization guidelines. The policies that referred to resource allocation were isolated and analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. Eight Australian policies addressed both withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment and resource allocation.ResultsFour resource-related themes were (...)
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  4.  4
    Better Regulation of End-Of-Life Care: A Call For A Holistic Approach.Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott & Eliana Close - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Existing regulation of end-of-life care is flawed. Problems include poorly-designed laws, policies, ethical codes, training, and funding programs, which often are neither effective nor helpful in guiding decision-making. This leads to adverse outcomes for patients, families, health professionals, and the health system as a whole. A key factor contributing to the harms of current regulation is a siloed approach to regulating end-of-life care. Existing approaches to regulation, and research into how that regulation could be improved, have tended to focus on (...)
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  5. International perspectives on end-of-life law reform: politics, persuasion, and persistence.Ben P. White & Lindy Willmott (eds.) - 2021 - New york, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    However, the barriers and facilitators of such changes - law reform perspectives - have been virtually ignored. Why do so many attempts to change the law fail but others are successful? International Perspectives on End-of-Life Law Reform aims to address this question by drawing on ten case studies of end-of-life law reform from the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, Belgium and Australia. Written by leading end-of-life scholars, the book's chapters blend perspectives from law, medicine, bioethics and sociology (...)
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  6.  1
    Junior Medical Officers’ knowledge of advance care directives and substitute decision making for people without decision making capacity: a cross sectional survey.Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mathew Clapham, Mary-Ann Ryall, Anne Knight, Emma Price, Carolyn Hullick, Robert Pickles, Lindy Willmott, Ben P. White, Alison Bowman, Jamie Bryant & Amy Waller - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundJunior medical doctors have a key role in discussions and decisions about treatment and end-of-life care for people with dementia in hospital. Little is known about junior doctors’ decision-making processes when treating people with dementia who have advance care directives, or the factors that influence their decisions. To describe among junior doctors in relation to two hypothetical vignettes involving patients with dementia: their legal compliance and decision-making process related to treatment decisions; the factors influencing their clinical decision-making; and the factors (...)
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