28 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Barbara K. Redman [22]Barbara Redman [5]Barbara Klug Redman [1]
  1.  59
    Rethinking the Belmont Report?Phoebe Friesen, Lisa Kearns, Barbara Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):15-21.
    This article reflects on the relevance and applicability of the Belmont Report nearly four decades after its original publication. In an exploration of criticisms that have been raised in response to the report and of significant changes that have occurred within the context of biomedical research, five primary themes arise. These themes include the increasingly vague boundary between research and practice, unique harms to communities that are not addressed by the principle of respect for persons, and how growing complexity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  2.  55
    Nurses’ Ethical Conflicts: what is really known about them?Barbara K. Redman & Sara T. Fry - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (4):360-366.
    The purpose of this article is to report what can be learned about nurses’ ethical conflicts by the systematic analysis of methodologically similar studies. Five studies were identified and analysed for: (1) the character of ethical conflicts experienced; (2) similarities and differences in how the conflicts were experienced and how they were resolved; and (3) ethical conflict themes underlying four specialty areas of nursing practice (diabetes education, paediatric nurse practitioner, rehabilitation and nephrology). The predominant character of the ethical conflicts was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  3.  19
    Federal Right to Try: Where Is It Going?Kelly Folkers, Carolyn Chapman & Barbara Redman - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (2):26-36.
    Policy‐makers, bioethicists, and patient advocates have been engaged in a fierce battle about the merits and potential harms of a federal right‐to‐try law. This debate about access to investigational medical products has raised profound questions about the limits of patient autonomy, appropriate government regulation, medical paternalism, and political rhetoric. For example, do patients have a right to access investigational therapies, as the right‐to‐try movement asserts? What is government’s proper role in regulating and facilitating access to drugs that are still in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  98
    No One Likes a Snitch.Barbara Redman & Arthur Caplan - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):813-819.
    Whistleblowers remain essential as complainants in allegations of research misconduct. Frequently internal to the research team, they are poorly protected from acts of retribution, which may deter the reporting of misconduct. In order to perform their important role, whistleblowers must be treated fairly. Draft regulations for whistleblower protection were published for public comment almost a decade ago but never issued. In the face of the growing challenge of research fraud, we suggest vigorous steps, to include: organizational responsibility to certify the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Institutional Approaches to Research Integrity in Ghana.Amos K. Laar, Barbara K. Redman, Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3037-3052.
    Research misconduct remains an important problem in health research despite decades of local, national, regional, and international efforts to eliminate it. The ultimate goal of every health research project, irrespective of setting, is to produce trustworthy findings to address local as well as global health issues. To be able to lead or participate meaningfully in international research collaborations, individual and institutional capacities for research integrity are paramount. Accordingly, this paper concerns itself not only with individuals’ research skills but also with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  21
    Off with their Heads: The Need to Criminalize some forms of Scientific Misconduct.Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):345-346.
    An increasingly long line of high-profile scientific misconduct cases raises the question of whether regulatory policy ought to incorporate more rigorous sanctions for investigators and their institutions. Broad and Wade graphically describe these cases through the early 1980s. They continue to recent times with the cases of Evan Dreyer, Kimon Angelides and Robert Liburdy, Justin Radolf, and others. In addition, recent Congressional investigation into conflict of interest concerns surrounding consulting by National Institutes of Health scientists has raised further questions about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7.  14
    Off with Their Heads: The Need to Criminalize Some Forms of Scientific Misconduct.Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):345-348.
    An increasingly long line of high-profile scientific misconduct cases raises the question of whether regulatory policy ought to incorporate more rigorous sanctions for investigators and their institutions. Broad and Wade graphically describe these cases through the early 1980s. They continue to recent times with the cases of Evan Dreyer, Kimon Angelides and Robert Liburdy, Justin Radolf, and others. In addition, recent Congressional investigation into conflict of interest concerns surrounding consulting by National Institutes of Health scientists has raised further questions about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  43
    Responsibility for control; ethics of patient preparation for self-management of chronic disease.Barbara K. Redman - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):243–250.
    ABSTRACT Patient self‐management (SM) of chronic disease is an evolving movement, with some forms documented as yielding important outcomes. Potential benefits from proper preparation and maintenance of patient SM skills include quality care tailored to the patient's preferences and life goals, and increase in skills in problem solving, confidence and success, generalizable to other parts of the patient's life. Four central ethical issues can be identified: 1) insufficient patient/family access to preparation that will optimize their competence to SM without harm (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  19
    Extending Ethical Strides: From Tribal IRBs to the Bronx Community Research Review Board.Phoebe Friesen, Lisa Kearns, Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):W5-W8.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  49
    Rounding: A Model for Consultation and Training Whose Time Has Come.Evan G. Derenzo, Janicemarie Vinicky, Barbara Redman, John J. Lynch, Philip Panzarella & Salim Rizk - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (2):207-215.
    Ethics rounds in clinical ethics have already taken hold in multiple venues. There are “sit-down rounds,” which usually consist of a bioethicist setting a specific, prescheduled time aside for residents and/or others to bring a case or two for discussion with the bioethicist. Another kind of rounds that occurs on an ad hoc or infrequent basis is to have either a staff or outside bioethicist give hospital-wide and/or departmental “grand rounds.” Grand rounds is a traditional educational format in medicine and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  31
    Responsibility of healthcare ethics committees towards nurses.Barbara K. Redman - 1996 - HEC Forum 8 (1):52-60.
  12.  6
    Research misconduct policy in biomedicine: beyond the bad-apple approach.Barbara Klug Redman - 2013 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
    An analysis of current biomedical research misconduct policy that proposes a new approach emphasizing the context of misconduct and improved oversight. Federal regulations that govern research misconduct in biomedicine have not been able to prevent an ongoing series of high-profile cases of fabricating, falsifying, or plagiarizing scientific research. In this book, Barbara Redman looks critically at current research misconduct policy and proposes a new approach that emphasizes institutional context and improved oversight. Current policy attempts to control risk at the individual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  19
    Closing the barn door: Coping with findings of research misconduct by trainees in the biomedical sciences.Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (3):124-132.
    The proportion of research misconduct cases among trainees in the biomedical sciences has risen, raising the question of why, and what are the responsibilities of research administrators and the research community to address this problem. Although there is no definitive research about causes, for trainees the relationship with a research mentor should play a major role in preventing actions that constitute research misconduct. Examination of the limited literature and of the number of cases closed by the US Office of Research (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  29
    Research misconduct among clinical trial staff.Barbara K. Redman, Thomas N. Templin & Jon F. Merz - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):481-489.
    Between 1993 and 2002, 39 clinical trial staff were investigated for scientific misconduct by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). Analysis of ORI case records reveals practices regarding workload, training and supervision that enable misconduct. Considering the potential effects on human subjects protection, quality and reliability of data, and the trustworthiness of the clinical research enterprise, regulations or guidance on use of clinical trial staff ought to be available. Current ORI regulations do not hold investigators or institutions responsible for supervision (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  38
    The Ethics of Self-Management Preparation for Chronic Illness.Barbara K. Redman - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):360-369.
    While nearly all patients with a chronic disease must self-manage their condition to some extent, preparation for these responsibilities is infrequently assured in the USA. The result can be significant harm and the undermining of a patient’s ability to take advantage of life opportunities and be productive. Agreeing to care for a patient involves a moral responsibility to see that she or he receives the essential elements of care, including the ability to manage the disease on a daily basis. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  17
    A pilot study of universities' willingness to solicit whistleblowers for participation in a study.Melissa J. Byrn, Barbara K. Redman & Jon F. Merz - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (4):260-264.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  17
    Single-Patient Expanded Access Requests: IRB Professionals’ Experiences and Perspectives.Carolyn Riley Chapman, Jenni A. Shearston, Kelly McBride Folkers, Barbara K. Redman, Arthur Caplan & Alison Bateman-House - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (2):88-99.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  5
    Rationing health and social goods during pandemics: Guidance for Ghanaian decision makers.Amos Laar, Debra DeBruin, Richard Ofori-Asenso, Matilda Essandoh Laar, Barbara Redman & Arthur Caplan - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (3):165-170.
    Healthcare rationing during pandemics has been widely discussed in global bioethics literature. However, existing scenarios and analyses have focused on high income countries, except for very few disease areas such as HIV treatment where some analyses related to African countries exist. We argue that the lack of scholastic discourse, and by extension, professional and democratic engagement on the subject constitute an unacceptable ethical omission. Not only have African governments failed to develop robust ethical plans for pandemics, ethicists in this region (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  25
    Commentary: Legacy of the Commission on Research Integrity.Barbara K. Redman - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):555-563.
    20 years ago, the Report of the Commission on Research Integrity was submitted to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services and to House and Senate Committees. As directed in enabling legislation, the Commission had provided recommendations on a new definition of research misconduct, oversight of scientific practices, and development of a regulation to protect whistleblowers. Reflecting the ethos of the time, the Commission recommended that institutions receiving Public Health Service research funding should provide oversight of all (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  12
    Correctable Myths About Research Misconduct in the Biomedical Sciences.Barbara K. Redman - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (2):621-629.
    A recent National Academy report on research integrity noted that policies are not evidence-based, with no formal entity responsible to attend to this deficit. Here we describe four areas of research misconduct regulations governing Public Health Service funded research that are empirically and/or ethically questionable. Policies for human subject protection, RM and conflict of interest are not harmonized, making it extremely difficult to deal with complex cases which often contain allegations in all of these areas. Second, detection of RM has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Ethical Issues in the Development and Use of Guidelines for Clinical Practice.Barbara K. Redman - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (3):251-256.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  28
    Clinical Practice Guidelines as Tools of Public Policy: Conflicts of Purpose, Issues of Autonomy, and Justice.Barbara K. Redman - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (4):303-309.
  23.  6
    Data Alteration.Barbara K. Redman - 2023 - In Erick Valdés & Juan Alberto Lecaros (eds.), Handbook of Bioethical Decisions. Volume II: Scientific Integrity and Institutional Ethics. Springer Verlag. pp. 2147483647-2147483647.
    Data alteration requires consideration of: what are data, when should they be available and what is their quality. Alteration may be intended or unintended: scientific misconduct, scientific error, use of questionable research practices, or community-based and cultural interpretations of data relevance. Situations in which data alteration are at risk include those in which conflict of interest (and thus potential for bias) is endemic, and those in which powerful incentives that do not support research integrity are present. Consequences of intentional and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  12
    D uring the.Barbara K. Redman - 2009 - In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company. pp. 213.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  7
    Ethical Issues in the Development and Use of Guidelines for Clinical Practice.Barbara K. Redman - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (3):251-256.
  26.  12
    The Ethical Ecucation of the RN.Barbara K. Redman & Judith M. Cassells - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (5):2-3.
  27.  24
    When Is Patient Education Unethical?Barbara K. Redman - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (6):813-820.
    Although patient education is central to the ethical practice of nursing, it can be practiced in an ethically contested or unethical way. It is sometimes used to: forward a societal goal the individual might not have chosen; assume that patients should learn to accommodate unjust treatment; exclude the views of all except the dominant health care provider group; limit the knowledge a patient can receive; make invalid or unreliable judgments about what a patient can learn; or require a patient to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  73
    Review of measurement instruments in research ethics in the biomedical sciences, 2008−2012. [REVIEW]Barbara K. Redman - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (3):141-150.
    There is an urgent need in biomedical science to understand whether regulations are being met, prerequisite to goals of subject protection and integrity in research practice. This article presents an update of a 2006 summary of measurement instruments in research ethics with psychometric information in the years 2008−2012. A review of 25 instruments identified seven used in the time period 2008−2012 and which had accumulated at least one study of its psychometric qualities beyond its developmental phase. Many of these instruments (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations