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Barbara Pesut [20]Barbara K. Pesut [1]
  1.  15
    Nursing and euthanasia: A narrative review of the nursing ethics literature.Barbara Pesut, Madeleine Greig, Sally Thorne, Janet Storch, Michael Burgess, Carol Tishelman, Kenneth Chambaere & Robert Janke - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301984512.
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  2.  12
    Shades of gray: Conscientious objection in medical assistance in dying.Barbara Pesut, Sally Thorne & Madeleine Greig - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (1):e12308.
    With the advent of legalized medical assistance in dying [MAiD] in Canada in 2016, nursing is facing intriguing new ethical and theoretical challenges. Among them is the concept of conscientious objection, which was built into the legislation as a safeguard to protect the rights of healthcare workers who feel they cannot participate in something that feels morally or ethically wrong. In this paper, we consider the ethical complexity that characterizes nurses' participation in MAiD and propose strategies to support nurses' moral (...)
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  3.  53
    The problematic allure of the binary in nursing theoretical discourse.Sally E. Thorne, Angela D. Henderson, Gladys I. McPherson & Barbara K. Pesut - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):208-215.
    Recent ideological positioning on the world stage has born a startling resemblance to a form of positioning within nursing theory – that of taking complex ideas, reducing them to a simplistic binary form, and uncritically adopting one half of that form. In some cases, this adoption of a binary position has led to a passionately held form of ‘othering’ that prohibits a healthy and critical engagement with ideas. As alluring as settling for the binary form may be – we argue (...)
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  4.  5
    Reflections on the relational ontology of medical assistance in dying.Barbara Pesut & Sally Thorne - 2023 - Nursing Philosophy 24 (4):e12438.
    Canadian nursing practice has been profoundly influenced by the legalization of medical assistance in dying in 2016, requiring that nurses navigate new and sometimes highly challenging experiences. Findings from our longitudinal studies of nurses' experiences suggest that these include deep emotional responses to medical assistance in dying, an urgency in orchestrating the perfect death, and a high degree of relational impact, both professionally and personally. Here we propose a theoretical explanation for these experiences based upon a relational ontology. Drawing upon (...)
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  5.  35
    Ontologies of nursing in an age of spiritual pluralism: Closed or open worldview?Barbara Pesut - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):15-23.
    North American society has undergone a period of sacralization where ideas of spirituality have increasingly been infused into the public domain. This sacralization is particularly evident in the nursing discourse where it is common to find claims about the nature of persons as inherently spiritual, about what a spiritually healthy person looks like and about the environment as spiritually energetic and interconnected. Nursing theoretical thinking has also used claims about the nature of persons, health, and the environment to attempt to (...)
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  6.  1
    Conscience and conscientious objection in nursing: A personalist bioethics approach.Christina Lamb & Barbara Pesut - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (7-8):1319-1328.
    The ability of nurses to act as moral agents in accordance with their conscience is both an essential human freedom and an important part of professional ethics. Recent developments in Canada related to Medical Assistance in Dying have revealed new and important challenges related to conscientious objection – challenges that may require rethinking of how nurses do professional ethics. Notably, the inclusion of a personalist bioethical approach is needed to introduce and explicate what conscience is for nurses to be able (...)
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  7.  30
    A conversation on diverse perspectives of spirituality in nursing literature.Barbara Pesut - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):98-109.
    Spirituality has long been considered a dimension of holistic palliative care. However, conceptualizations of spirituality are in transition in the nursing literature. No longer rooted within religion, spirituality is increasingly being defined by the universal search for meaning, connectedness, energy, and transcendence. To be human is to be spiritual. Some have argued that the concept of spirituality in the nursing literature has become so generic that it is no longer meaningful. A conceptualization that attempts to be all‐encompassing of what it (...)
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  8.  15
    To describe or prescribe: assumptions underlying a prescriptive nursing process approach to spiritual care.Barbara Pesut & Rick Sawatzky - 2006 - Nursing Inquiry 13 (2):127-134.
    Increasing attention is being paid to spirituality in nursing practice. Much of the literature on spiritual care uses the nursing process to describe this aspect of care. However, the use of the nursing process in the area of spirituality may be problematic, depending upon the understandings of the nature and intent of this process. Is it primarily a descriptive process meant to make visible the nursing actions to provide spiritual support, or is it a prescriptive process meant to guide nursing (...)
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  9.  7
    But it’s legal, isn’t it? Law and ethics in nursing practice related to medical assistance in dying.Catharine J. Schiller, Barbara Pesut, Josette Roussel & Madeleine Greig - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4):e12277.
    In June 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the Criminal Code's prohibition on assisted death. Just over a year later, the federal government crafted legislation to entrench medical assistance in dying (MAiD), the term used in Canada in place of physician‐assisted death. Notably, Canada became the first country to allow nurse practitioners to act as assessors and providers, a result of a strong lobby by the Canadian Nurses Association. However, a legislated approach to assisted death has proven challenging (...)
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  10.  13
    There be dragons: effects of unexplored religion on nurses’ competence in spiritual care.Barbara Pesut - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (3):191-199.
    On ancient maps unexplored lands were simply labeled ‘there be dragons’ indicating the fear that attends the unknown. Despite three decades of theoretical and empirical work on spirituality in nursing, evidence still suggests that nurses do not feel competent to engage in spiritual care. In this paper I propose that one of the reasons for this is a theory–theory gap between religion and spirituality. Generalized anxiety about the role of religion in society has led to under‐theorizing in nursing about religious (...)
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  11.  15
    Philosophy and politics in contemporary nursing discourse (Dr. Barbara Pesut).Barbara Pesut - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (4):e12407.
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  12.  31
    Hospital chaplaincy in the twenty-first century: The crisis of spiritual care on the nhs.Barbara Pesut - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):144-146.
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  13.  7
    Incorporating Patients' Spirituality Into Care Using Gadow's Ethical Framework.Barbara Pesut - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (4):418-428.
    Incorporating patients' spiritual beliefs into health care decision making is essential for ethically good care. Gadow's three-level ethical framework of ethical immediacy, ethical universalism, and relational narrative is presented as a tool for enhancing nurses' ability to explore and deepen understandings of patients' spiritual beliefs, given that these and their experiences are often expressed in a language that seems foreign to nurses. The demographic and cultural shifts that lead to the necessity to understand patients who use principles and metaphors that, (...)
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  14.  21
    If time is relative … then why don't I have enough of it?Barbara Pesut - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):75-77.
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  15.  10
    Nursings’ need for the idea of spirituality.Barbara Pesut - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (1):5-10.
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  16.  9
    Profits and prophets: Derrida on linguistic bereavement and (Im)possibility in nursing.Barbara Pesut - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (1):e12186.
    The work of Jacques Derrida has received relatively little attention within nursing philosophy. Perhaps this is because Derrida is known best for deconstructing philosophy itself, a task he performed by making language unintelligible to make a point. This in itself makes his work daunting for nurses who do applied philosophy. Despite these difficulties, Derrida's focus on holding open a space for ideas, particularly those ideas that are invisible or unpopular, holds potential for enhancing the diversity of ideas within nursing. His (...)
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  17.  12
    Particularizing spirituality in points of tension: enriching the discourse.Barbara Pesut, Marsha Fowler, Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham, Elizabeth Johnston Taylor & Rick Sawatzky - 2009 - Nursing Inquiry 16 (4):337-346.
    The tremendous growth in nursing literature about spirituality has garnered proportionately little critique. Part of the reason may be that the broad generalizing claims typical of this literature have not been sufficiently explicated so that their particular implications for a practice discipline could be evaluated. Further, conceptualizations that attempt to encompass all possible views are difficult to challenge outside of a particular location. However, once one assumes a particular location in relation to spirituality, then the question becomes how one resolves (...)
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  18.  26
    Philosophizing social justice in rural palliative care: Hayek's moral stone?Barbara Pesut, Frances Beswick, Carole A. Robinson & Joan L. Bottorff - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):46-55.
    Increasingly, palliative care is being referred to as an essential programme and in some cases as a human right. Once it is recognized as such, it becomes part of the lexicon of social justice in that it can be argued that all members of society should have access to such care. However, this begs the question of how that care should be enacted, particularly in rural and remote areas. This question illustrates some of Friedrich Hayek's critiques of social justice. Hayek (...)
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  19.  27
    Be known, be available, be mutual: a qualitative ethical analysis of social values in rural palliative care. [REVIEW]Barbara Pesut, Joan L. Bottorff & Carole A. Robinson - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):19-.
    Background: Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives. Methods: We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour travelling distance by car (...)
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