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  1.  7
    Humanitarian Identity and the Political Sublime: Intervention of a Postcolonial Feminist.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    In Humanitarian Identity and the Political Sublime, Ashmita Khasnabish unites Amartya Sen's concept of pluralistic identity with Sri Aurobindo's philosophy of the "religion of human unity," where the European and Western philosophy of Enlightenment meets the East/India/Bengali intellectual and spiritual thought. The resulting neo-Enlightenment philosophy of identity incorporates Teresa Brennan's theory of the "transmission of affect" and the Relational Cultural Theory, culminating in a discussion of the postcolonial literary texts of Rushdie and Kincaid.
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  2.  1
    Jouissance as Ānanda: Indian Philosophy, Feminist Theory, and Literature.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    Jouissance as Ananda seeks to resolve the often-problematic Western concept of the ego by proposing a cross-cultural theory of consciousness that draws on Indian philosophy. Author Ashmita Khasnabish uses the Indian concept of ananda to advance Irigaray's theory of jouissance and offers a re-reading of jouissance from an Indian cross-cultural psychoanalytic point of view.
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  3.  1
    Negotiating Capability and Diaspora: A Philosophical Politics.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    Negotiating Capability and Diaspora examines Amartya Sen’s theory of capability in dialogue with the American philosopher John Rawls. Sen’s theory arose to show an oriental dimension of the critique of utilitarianism that valorizes will power and honor diversity. Indian philosopher Aurobindo also enters the discourse to complement the theory of capability with supra-rational theory of emotional purification. In addition, feminist philosopher Martha Nussbaum plays a major role in the book as do the literary writers of diaspora.
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  4. Women in the East and Women in the West.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2005 - In Ashok Vohra, Arvind Sharma & Mrinal Miri (eds.), Dharma, the Categorial Imperative. D.K. Printworld. pp. 422.
     
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  5.  20
    The Psychic Versus the Social in Teresa Brennan and Jamaica Kincaid.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2007 - CLR James Journal 13 (1):39-58.
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  6.  5
    On the Theme of Liberated Love and Global Feminist Discourse.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):275-283.
    My exploration of the work of Pamela Sue Anderson focuses on what she calls “a philosophical imaginary” in her article “Towards a New Philosophical Imaginary,” in which she responds to Judith Butler’s theory of relational ontology and vulnerability. Anderson’s project is to recast the term vulnerable, which is often associated with feminine weakness, as a positive energy. Critiquing Western myths that portray women as less empowered than men, as in Mary Midgley’s reference to Minerva and Owl that denigrates women as (...)
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  7.  8
    Kincaid and Sri Aurobindo: Ego-Transcendence in Indian and Afro-Caribbean Thought.Ashmita Khasnabish - 2002 - CLR James Journal 9 (1):67-94.
  8.  6
    Brinda Mehta's Diasporic (Dis)Locations Indo-Caribbean Women Writers Negotiate the Kalapani. [REVIEW]Ashmita Khasnabish - 2006 - CLR James Journal 12 (1):157-163.