9 found
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  1.  5
    Qualitative Analysis of Healthcare Professionals’ Viewpoints on the Role of Ethics Committees and Hospitals in the Resolution of Clinical Ethical Dilemmas.Brian S. Marcus, Gary Shank, Jestin N. Carlson & Arvind Venkat - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):11-34.
    Ethics consultation is a commonly applied mechanism to address clinical ethical dilemmas. However, there is little information on the viewpoints of health care providers towards the relevance of ethics committees and appropriate application of ethics consultation in clinical practice. We sought to use qualitative methodology to evaluate free-text responses to a case-based survey to identify thematically the views of health care professionals towards the role of ethics committees in resolving clinical ethical dilemmas. Using an iterative and reflexive model we identified (...)
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  2.  33
    Comparison of viewpoints of health care professionals with or without involvement with formal ethics processes on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas.Brian S. Marcus, Jestin Carlson, Gajanan G. Hegde, Jennifer Shang & Arvind Venkat - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (1-2):22-33.
    ObjectiveOur objective was to evaluate whether those individuals with previous involvement with formal clinical ethics processes differ in their attitudes towards the resolution of prototypical clinical ethics cases than general health care professionals. We hypothesized that those individuals with previous participation in ethics consultation would have significantly different attitudes on the appropriate role of ethics committees in the assessment and resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas than those who have not.MethodsWe conducted a case-based survey of health care professionals at six US (...)
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  3.  8
    Surrogate Medical Decision Making on Behalf of a Never-Competent, Profoundly Intellectually Disabled Patient Who Is Acutely Ill.Arvind Venkat - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):71-78.
    With the improvements in medical care and resultant increase in life expectancy of the intellectually disabled, it will become more common for healthcare providers to be confronted by ethical dilemmas in the care of this patient population. Many of the dilemmas will focus on what is in the best interest of patients who have never been able to express their wishes with regard to medical and end-of-life care and who should be empowered to exercise surrogate medical decision-making authority on their (...)
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  4.  5
    Evaluation of Viewpoints of Health Care Professionals on the Role of Ethics Committees and Hospitals in the Resolution of Clinical Ethical Dilemmas Based on Practice Environment.Brian S. Marcus, Jestin N. Carlson, Gajanan G. Hegde, Jennifer Shang & Arvind Venkat - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):35-52.
    We sought to evaluate whether health care professionals’ viewpoints differed on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas based on practice location. We conducted a survey study from December 21, 2013 to March 15, 2014 of health care professionals at six hospitals. The survey consisted of eight clinical ethics cases followed by statements on whether there was a role for the ethics committee or hospital in their resolution, what that role might be and (...)
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  5.  15
    Responding to the Refusal of Care in the Emergency Department.Jennifer Nelson, Arvind Venkat & Moira Davenport - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (1):75-80.
    The emergency department (ED) serves as the primary gateway for acute care and the source of health care of last resort. Emergency physicians are commonly expected to rapidly assess and treat patients with a variety of life–threatening conditions. However, patients do refuse recommended therapy, even when the consequences are significant morbidity and even mortality. This raises the ethical dilemma of how emergency physicians and ED staff can rapidly determine whether patient refusal of treatment recommendations is based on intact decision–making capacity (...)
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  6.  11
    Ethical Tensions in the Pain Management of an End-Stage Cancer Patient with Evidence of Opioid Medication Diversion.Arvind Venkat & David Kim - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (2):95-101.
    At the end of life, pain management is commonly a fundamental part of the treatment plan for patients where curative measures are no longer possible. However, the increased recognition of opioid diversion for secondary gain coupled with efforts to treat patients in the home environment towards the end of life creates the potential for ethical dilemmas in the palliative care management of terminal patients in need of continuous pain management. We present the case of an end-stage patient with rectal cancer (...)
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  7.  5
    Possible Unintended Consequences of Including Equal-Priority Surrogates.Arvind Venkat & Steven Perry - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 26 (2):189-190.
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  8.  5
    The threshold moment: ethical tensions surrounding decision making on tracheostomy for patients in the intensive care unit.Arvind Venkat - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (2):135-143.
    With the aging of the general population and the ability of intensivists to support patients using ventilator support, tracheostomy has become a vital tool in the medical management of critically ill patients. While much of the medical literature on tracheostomy has focused on the optimal timing of and indications for performing this procedure, little is written on the ethical tensions that can revolve around decisions by patients, surrogates, and physicians on its use. This article will elucidate the ethical dilemmas that (...)
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  9.  24
    When to Say When: Responding to a Suicide Attempt in the Acute Care Setting.Arvind Venkat & Jonathan Drori - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (3):263-270.
    Attempted suicide represents a personal tragedy for the patient and their loved ones and can be a challenge for acute care physicians. Medical professionals generally view it as their obligation to aggressively treat patients who are critically ill after a suicide attempt, on the presumption that a suicidal patient lacks decision making capacity from severe psychiatric impairment. However, physicians may be confronted by deliberative patient statements, advanced directives or surrogate decision makers who urge the withholding or withdrawal of life sustaining (...)
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