8 found
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  1. American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions.Arthur Versluis - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    The first major study since the 1930s of the relationship between American Transcendentalism and Asian religions, and the first comprehensive work to include post-Civil War Transcendentalists like Samuel Johnson, this book is encyclopedic in scope. Beginning with the inception of Transcendentalist Orientalism in Europe, Versluis covers the entire history of American Transcendentalism into the twentieth century, and the profound influence of Orientalism on the movement--including its analogues and influences in world religious dialogue. He examines what he calls "positive Orientalism," which (...)
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  2.  17
    Voegelin's Antignosticism and the Origins of Totalitarianism.Arthur Versluis - 2002 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2002 (124):173-182.
  3.  2
    American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions.Eric A. Huberman & Arthur Versluis - 1995 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 115 (1):160.
  4.  2
    Esotericism, Art, and Imagination.Arthur Versluis, Lee Irwin, John Richards & Melinda Weinstein (eds.) - 2008 - Michigan State University Press.
    _Esotericism, Art, and Imagination_ is a uniquely wide- ranging collection of articles by scholars in the field of Western esotericism, focusing on themes of poetry, drama, film, literature, and art. Included here are articles illuminating such diverse topics as the Gnostic fiction of Philip Pullman, alchemical images, the Tarot, surrealism, esoteric films, and much more. This collection reveals the richness and complexity of the intersections between esotericism, artistic creators, and their works. Authors include Joscelyn Godwin, Cathy Gutierrez, M. E. Warlick, (...)
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  5.  25
    Carl Schmitt, Modernity, and the Secret Roads Inward.Arthur Versluis - 2009 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2009 (148):28-38.
    Understanding intellectual lineages is vital if we are to understand our own era more clearly and deeply. It is not enough to investigate this or that figure in isolation. An author who is worth reading embodies many forebears, so by recognizing them, one comes to understand not only the work of a given individual but also much larger currents that have shaped and that continue to shape the often hidden intellectual architecture of our time. Carl Schmitt is particularly instructive in (...)
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  6.  24
    The “Counterculture,” Gnosis, and Modernity.Arthur Versluis - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (152):31-43.
    ExcerptInterpretations of the 1960s have tended to fall into two general camps. One group consists in those who trace perceived social ills back to that period, like a colleague who, morosely contemplating the failures of academe, said that one couldn't begin to rebuild the humanities and social sciences until the generation forged in that era had retired. Another group consists in those for whom the 1960s represent the birth of a still unfinished social revolution, and for them, the era is (...)
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  7.  18
    Antimodernism.Arthur Versluis - 2006 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (137):96-130.
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  8.  15
    Western Esotericism and Consciousness.Arthur Versluis - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):20-33.
    This article introduces the relatively new field of religious studies devoted to Western esotericism, or Western esoteric traditions including alchemy, various magical traditions, Christian theosophy, Rosicrucianism and other secret or semi-secret groups. In it Versluis also argues that Western esoteric traditions as a whole rely on the power of the written word or image in order to convey and perhaps generate changes in consciousness. Thus Western esotericism tends to see and use language in a fundamentally different way than many of (...)
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