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Arthur L. Caplan [143]Arthur Caplan [95]Arthur Leonard Caplan [1]Arthur C. Caplan [1]
  1.  29
    Helpful Lessons and Cautionary Tales: How Should COVID-19 Drug Development and Access Inform Approaches to Non-Pandemic Diseases?Holly Fernandez Lynch, Arthur Caplan, Patricia Furlong & Alison Bateman-House - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (12):4-19.
    After witnessing extraordinary scientific and regulatory efforts to speed development of and access to new COVID-19 interventions, patients facing other serious diseases have begun to ask “where’s...
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  2.  72
    Rethinking the Belmont Report?Phoebe Friesen, Lisa Kearns, Barbara Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):15-21.
    This article reflects on the relevance and applicability of the Belmont Report nearly four decades after its original publication. In an exploration of criticisms that have been raised in response to the report and of significant changes that have occurred within the context of biomedical research, five primary themes arise. These themes include the increasingly vague boundary between research and practice, unique harms to communities that are not addressed by the principle of respect for persons, and how growing complexity and (...)
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  3.  38
    Back to class: A note on the ontology of species.Arthur L. Caplan - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (1):130-140.
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  4.  71
    All Gifts Large and Small: Toward an Understanding of the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Industry Gift-Giving.Jon F. Merz, Arthur L. Caplan & Dana Katz - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):11-17.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  5.  40
    Selecting the Right Tool For the Job.Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):4-10.
    There are competing ethical concerns when it comes to designing any clinical research study. Clinical trials of possible treatments for Ebola virus are no exception. If anything, the competing ethical concerns are exacerbated in trying to find answers to a deadly, rapidly spreading, infectious disease. The primary goal of current research is to identify experimental therapies that can cure Ebola or cure it with reasonable probability in infected individuals. Pursuit of that goal must be methodologically sound, practical and consistent with (...)
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  6.  40
    Pick your poison: Historicism, essentialism, and emergentism in the definition of species.Arthur L. Caplan - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):285-286.
  7.  73
    A National Study of Ethics Committees.Glenn McGee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan & David A. Asch - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):60-64.
    Conceived as a solution to clinical dilemmas, and now required by organizations for hospital accreditation, ethics committees have been subject only to small-scale studies. The wide use of ethics committees and the diverse roles they play compel study. In 1999 the University of Pennsylvania Ethics Committee Research Group (ECRG) completed the first national survey of the presence, composition, and activities of U.S. healthcare ethics committees (HECs). Ethics committees are relatively young, on average seven years in operation. Eighty-six percent of ethics (...)
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  8.  72
    All Gifts Large and Small.Dana Katz, Arthur L. Caplan & Jon F. Merz - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):39-46.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  9.  27
    Scientific Controversies: Case Studies in the Resolution and Closure of Disputes in Science and Technology.Hugo Tristram Engelhardt, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, Arthur L. Caplan & Drs William F. And Virginia Connolly Mitty Chair Arthur L. Caplan - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays examines the ways in which disputes and controversies about the application of scientific knowledge are resolved. Four concrete examples of public controversy are considered in detail: the efficacy of Laetrile, the classification of homosexuality as a disease, the setting of safety standards in the workplace, and the utility of nuclear energy as a source of power. The essays in this volume show that debates about these cases are not confined to matters of empirical fact. Rather, as (...)
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  10. Love thy neighbour? Allocating vaccines in a world of competing obligations.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e20-e20.
    Although a safe, effective, and licensed coronavirus vaccine does not yet exist, there is already controversy over how it ought to be allocated. Justice is clearly at stake, but it is unclear what justice requires in the international distribution of a scarce vaccine during a pandemic. Many are condemning ‘vaccine nationalism’ as an obstacle to equitable global distribution. We argue that limited national partiality in allocating vaccines will be a component of justice rather than an obstacle to it. For there (...)
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  11.  32
    Concepts of health and disease: interdisciplinary perspectives.Arthur L. Caplan, Hugo Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.) - 1981 - Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division.
    The concepts of health and disease play pivotal roles in medicine and the health professions This volume brings together the requisite literature for understanding current discussions and debates these concepts. The selections in the volume attempt to present a wide range of views concerning the nature of the concepts of health and issues using both historical and contemporary sources -- Back cover.
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  12.  30
    Expanding Access to Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation: An Analysis by Analogy.Tuua Ruutiainen, Steve Miller, Arthur Caplan & Jill P. Ginsberg - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):28-35.
    Researchers are developing a fertility preservation technique?testicular tissue cryopreservation (TTCP)?for prepubescent boys who may become infertile as a result of their cancer treatment. Although this technique is still in development, some researchers are calling for its widespread use. They argue that if boys do not bank their tissue now, they will be unable to benefit from any therapies that might be developed in the future. There are, however, risks involved with increasing access to an investigational procedure. This article examines four (...)
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  13.  13
    Ethical Engineers Need Not Apply: The State of Applied Ethics Today.Arthur L. Caplan - 1980 - Science, Technology and Human Values 5 (4):24-32.
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  14.  76
    Successes and Failures of Hospital Ethics Committees: A National Survey of Ethics Committee Chairs.Glenn Mcgee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan, Dina Penny & David A. Asch - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):87-93.
    In 1992, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) passed a mandate that all its approved hospitals put in place a means for addressing ethical concerns.Although the particular process the hospital uses to address such concernsmay vary, the hospital or healthcare ethics committee (HEC) is used most often. In a companion study to that reported here, we found that in 1998 over 90% of U.S. hospitals had ethics committees, compared to just 1% in 1983, and that many (...)
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  15.  80
    Paradigms for Clinical Ethics Consultation Practice.Mark D. Fox, Glenn Mcgee & Arthur Caplan - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):308-314.
    Clinical bioethics is big business. There are now hundreds of people who bioethics in community and university hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation and home care settings, and some who play the role of clinical ethics consultant to transplant teams, managed care companies, and genetic testing firms. Still, there is as much speculation about what clinically active bioethicists actually do as there was ten years ago. Various commentators have pondered the need for training standards, credentials, exams, and malpractice insurance for ethicists engaged (...)
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  16.  22
    Consideration and Disclosure of Group Risks in Genomics and Other Data-Centric Research: Does the Common Rule Need Revision?Carolyn Riley Chapman, Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Heini M. Natri, Courtney Berrios, Patrick Dwyer, Kellie Owens, Síofra Heraty & Arthur L. Caplan - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-14.
    Harms and risks to groups and third-parties can be significant in the context of research, particularly in data-centric studies involving genomic, artificial intelligence, and/or machine learning technologies. This article explores whether and how United States federal regulations should be adapted to better align with current ethical thinking and protect group interests. Three aspects of the Common Rule deserve attention and reconsideration with respect to group interests: institutional review board (IRB) assessment of the risks/benefits of research; disclosure requirements in the informed (...)
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  17.  7
    The Sociobiology Debate: Readings on Ethical and Scientific Issues.Arthur L. Caplan - 1978 - HarperCollins Publishers.
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  18.  60
    Fair, just and compassionate: A pilot for making allocation decisions for patients requesting experimental drugs outside of clinical trials.Arthur L. Caplan, J. Russell Teagarden, Lisa Kearns, Alison S. Bateman-House, Edith Mitchell, Thalia Arawi, Ross Upshur, Ilina Singh, Joanna Rozynska, Valerie Cwik & Sharon L. Gardner - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (11):761-767.
    Patients have received experimental pharmaceuticals outside of clinical trials for decades. There are no industry-wide best practices, and many companies that have granted compassionate use, or ‘preapproval’, access to their investigational products have done so without fanfare and without divulging the process or grounds on which decisions were made. The number of compassionate use requests has increased over time. Driving the demand are new treatments for serious unmet medical needs; patient advocacy groups pressing for access to emerging treatments; internet platforms (...)
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  19.  99
    The Use of Prisoners as Sources of Organs–An Ethically Dubious Practice.Arthur Caplan - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):1 - 5.
    The movement to try to close the ever-widening gap between demand and supply of organs has recently arrived at the prison gate. While there is enthusiasm for using executed prisoners as sources of organs, there are both practical barriers and moral concerns that make it unlikely that proposals to use prisoners will or should gain traction. Prisoners are generally not healthy enough to be a safe source of organs, execution makes the procurement of viable organs difficult, and organ donation post-execution (...)
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  20.  31
    Shouldn't Dead Be Dead?: The Search for a Uniform Definition of Death.Ariane Lewis, Katherine Cahn-Fuller & Arthur Caplan - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):112-128.
    In 1968, the definition of death in the United States was expanded to include not just death by cardiopulmonary criteria, but also death by neurologic criteria. We explore the way the definition has been modified by the medical and legal communities over the past 50 years and address the medical, legal and ethical controversies associated with the definition at present, with a particular highlight on the Supreme Court of Nevada Case of Aden Hailu.
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  21.  30
    The ethics of testing and research of manufactured organs on brain-dead/recently deceased subjects.Brendan Parent, Bruce Gelb, Stephen Latham, Ariane Lewis, Laura L. Kimberly & Arthur L. Caplan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):199-204.
    Over 115 000 people are waiting for life-saving organ transplants, of whom a small fraction will receive transplants and many others will die while waiting. Existing efforts to expand the number of available organs, including increasing the number of registered donors and procuring organs in uncontrolled environments, are crucial but unlikely to address the shortage in the near future and will not improve donor/recipient compatibility or organ quality. If successful, organ bioengineering can solve the shortage and improve functional outcomes. Studying (...)
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  22.  37
    Human rights violations in organ procurement practice in China.Norbert W. Paul, Arthur Caplan, Michael E. Shapiro, Charl Els, Kirk C. Allison & Huige Li - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):11.
    Over 90% of the organs transplanted in China before 2010 were procured from prisoners. Although Chinese officials announced in December 2014 that the country would completely cease using organs harvested from prisoners, no regulatory adjustments or changes in China’s organ donation laws followed. As a result, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China if consent is obtained. We have collected and analysed available evidence on human rights violations in the organ procurement practice in China. We demonstrate that the (...)
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  23.  62
    Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs.Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of organ procurement (...)
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  24.  49
    The Task Force Responds.Baruch Brody, Nancy Dubler, Jeff Blustein, Arthur Caplan, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Nancy Kass, Bernard Lo, Jonathan Moreno, Jeremy Sugarman & Laurie Zoloth - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (3):22-23.
  25.  11
    Moving the Womb.Arthur L. Caplan - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.
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  26.  27
    Can applied ethics be effective in health care and should it strive to be?Arthur L. Caplan - 1982 - Ethics 93 (2):311-319.
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  27. Does the philosophy of medicine exist?Arthur L. Caplan - 1992 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1):67-77.
    There has been a great deal of discussion, in this journal and others, about obstacles hindering the evolution of the philosophy of medicine. Such discussions presuppose that there is widespread agreement about what it is that constitutes the philosophy of medicine.Despite the fact that there is, and has been for decades, a great deal of literature, teaching and professional activity carried out explicitly in the name of the philosophy of medicine, this is not enough to establish that consensus exists as (...)
     
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  28.  14
    Regaining Trust in Public Health and Biomedical Science following Covid: The Role of Scientists.Arthur L. Caplan - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (S2):105-109.
    Biomedical science suffered a loss of trust during the Covid‐19 pandemic. Why? One reason is a crisis fueled by confusion over the epistemology of science. Attacks on biomedical expertise rest on a mistaken view of what the justification is for crediting scientific information. The ideas that science is characterized by universal agreement and that any evolution or change of beliefs about facts and theories undermines trustworthiness in science are simply false. Biomedical science is trustworthy precisely because it is fallible, admits (...)
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  29. It’s Not Easy Bein’ Fair.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur L. Caplan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):160-162.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 160-162.
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  30.  33
    Ethical Considerations in Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Addiction and Overeating Associated With Obesity.Jared M. Pisapia, Casey H. Halpern, Ulf J. Muller, Piergiuseppe Vinai, John A. Wolf, Donald M. Whiting, Thomas A. Wadden, Gordon H. Baltuch & Arthur L. Caplan - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (2):35-46.
    The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders and the improved understanding of the neurobiologic and neuroanatomic bases of psychiatric diseases have led to proposals to expand current DBS applications. Recent preclinical and clinical work with Alzheimer's disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder, for example, supports the safety of stimulating regions in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens in humans. These regions are known to be involved in addiction and overeating associated with obesity. However, the use of DBS targeting these areas (...)
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  31.  11
    Special Supplement: Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness.Bruce Jennings, Daniel Callahan & Arthur L. Caplan - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (1):1.
  32. Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine.Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) - 2004 - Georgetown University Press.
    Health, Disease, and Illness brings together a sterling list of classic and contemporary thinkers to examine the history, state, and future of ever-changing "concepts" in medicine.
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  33.  62
    Should Compensation for Organ Donation Be Allowed?Arthur Caplan & Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):286-296.
    The need for organs to transplant is clear. Due to the lack of transplants, people suffer, they die, and the cost of taking care of them until they die is huge. There is general agreement that it would be good to increase the supply of organs in order to meet the demand for organ transplantation.
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  34. No One Likes a Snitch.Barbara Redman & Arthur Caplan - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):813-819.
    Whistleblowers remain essential as complainants in allegations of research misconduct. Frequently internal to the research team, they are poorly protected from acts of retribution, which may deter the reporting of misconduct. In order to perform their important role, whistleblowers must be treated fairly. Draft regulations for whistleblower protection were published for public comment almost a decade ago but never issued. In the face of the growing challenge of research fraud, we suggest vigorous steps, to include: organizational responsibility to certify the (...)
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  35.  21
    Is There a Duty to Serve as a Subject in Biomedical Research?Arthur L. Caplan - 1984 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 6 (5):1.
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  36.  37
    Direct to confusion: Lessons learned from marketing brca testing.Ellen Matloff & Arthur Caplan - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):5 – 8.
    Myriad Genetics holds a patent on testing for the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, and therefore has a forced monopoly on this critical genetic test. Myriad launched a Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) marketing campaign in the Northeast United States in September 2007 and plans to expand that campaign to Florida and Texas in 2008. The ethics of Myriad's patent, forced monopoly and DTC campaign will be reviewed, as well as the impact of this situation on patient access and (...)
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  37.  96
    What's morally wrong with eugenics.Arthur L. Caplan - 2004 - In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine. Georgetown University Press.
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  38.  42
    Special Supplement: The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen, Shana Alexander, Judith P. Swazey, Warren T. Reich, Robert M. Veatch, Daniel Callahan, Tom L. Beauchamp, Stanley Hauerwas, K. Danner Clouser, David J. Rothman, Daniel M. Fox, Stanley J. Reiser & Arthur L. Caplan - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S1.
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  39. Good, better or best.Arthur L. Caplan - 2009 - In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oxford University Press. pp. 199--209.
  40.  39
    How long is long enough, and have we done everything we should?—Ethics of calling codes.Primi-Ashley Ranola, Raina M. Merchant, Sarah M. Perman, Abigail M. Khan, David Gaieski, Arthur L. Caplan & James N. Kirkpatrick - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):663-666.
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  41.  44
    Moving the womb.Arthur L. Caplan, Constance Marie Perry, Lauren A. Plante, Joseph Saloma & Frances R. Batzer - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.
  42.  39
    Is it sound public policy to let the terminally ill access experimental medical innovations?Arthur Caplan - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):1 – 3.
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  43. The Unnaturalness of Aging: A Sickness unto Death?Arthur L. Caplan - 1981 - In Arthur L. Caplan, Hugo Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.), Concepts of health and disease: interdisciplinary perspectives. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division. pp. 725--737.
     
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  44. The concept of disease.Dominic Sisti & Arthur L. Caplan - 2016 - In Miriam Solomon, Jeremy R. Simon & Harold Kincaid (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. New York, NY: Routledge.
  45. Institutional Approaches to Research Integrity in Ghana.Amos K. Laar, Barbara K. Redman, Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3037-3052.
    Research misconduct remains an important problem in health research despite decades of local, national, regional, and international efforts to eliminate it. The ultimate goal of every health research project, irrespective of setting, is to produce trustworthy findings to address local as well as global health issues. To be able to lead or participate meaningfully in international research collaborations, individual and institutional capacities for research integrity are paramount. Accordingly, this paper concerns itself not only with individuals’ research skills but also with (...)
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  46.  7
    Policy & Politics: "Who Lost China?" A Foreshadowing of Today's Ideological Disputes in Bioethics.Arthur Caplan - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):12.
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  47.  23
    Organ Transplants: The Costs of Success.Arthur L. Caplan - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (6):23-32.
  48.  47
    Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China.Kirk C. Allison, Arthur Caplan, Michael E. Shapiro, Charl Els, Norbert W. Paul & Huige Li - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundIn December 2014, China announced that only voluntarily donated organs from citizens would be used for transplantation after January 1, 2015. Many medical professionals worldwide believe that China has stopped using organs from death-row prisoners.DiscussionIn the present article, we briefly review the historical development of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China and comprehensively analyze the social-political background and the legal basis of the announcement. The announcement was not accompanied by any change in organ sourcing legislations or regulations. As a (...)
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  49.  35
    The Perfect Must Not Overwhelm the Good: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Selecting the Right Tool For the Job”.Arthur L. Caplan, Carolyn Plunkett & Bruce Levin - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):W8 - W10.
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  50. Why autonomy needs help.Arthur L. Caplan - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):301-302.
    Some argue that to be effective in healthcare settings autonomy needs to be strengthened. The author thinks autonomy is fundamentally inadequate in healthcare settings and requires supplementation by experience-based paternalism on the part of doctors and healthcare providers.
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