Results for 'Antidiscrimination'

55 found
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  1. Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.Kimberle Crenshaw - 1989 - The University of Chicago Legal Forum 140:139-167.
  2.  81
    Should Antidiscrimination Laws Limit Freedom of Association? The Dangerous Allure of Human Rights Legislation: Richard A. Epstein.Richard A. Epstein - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):123-156.
    This article defends the classical liberal view of human interactions that gives strong protection to associational freedom except in cases that involve the use of force or fraud or the exercise of monopoly power. That conception is at war with the modern antidiscrimination or human rights laws that operate in competitive markets in such vital areas as employment and housing, with respect to matters of race, sex, age, and increasingly, disability. The article further argues that using the “human rights” (...)
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  3. Immigration, Association, and Antidiscrimination.Michael Blake - 2012 - Ethics 122 (4):748-762.
  4.  18
    Reciprocal Antidiscrimination Arguments.Yofi Tirosh - 2012 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 6 (2):229-246.
    This Article addresses a common characteristic of antidiscrimination law: To what extent should one antidiscrimination campaign be held accountable for other, related, discriminatory structures that it does not and cannot purport to correct? Plaintiffs in antidiscrimination cases are sometimes expected to account for the larger social context in which their claim is made. Defendants invoke this larger context as a way of rebutting the discrimination claim, by arguing that the plaintiff’s claim has “discriminatory residue” that would exacerbate (...)
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  5.  28
    Antidiscrimination, Welfare, and Democracy: Toward a Discourse-Ethical Understanding of Disability Law.David Ingram - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (2):213-248.
  6.  7
    Reciprocal Antidiscrimination Arguments.Yofi Tirosh - 2013 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 6 (2).
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  7.  27
    Reconsidering Genetic Antidiscrimination Legislation.Jon Beckwith & Joseph S. Alper - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):205-210.
    Until approximately twenty years ago, advances in the study of human genetics had little influence on the practice of medicine. In the 1980s, this changed dramatically with the mapping of the altered genes that cause cystic fibrosis and Huntington disease. In just a few years, these discoveries led to DNA-based tests that enabled clinicians to determine whether prospective parents were carriers of CF or whether an individual carried the Huntington gene and, as a result, would almost certainly develop the disease.Observers (...)
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  8.  3
    Six. Antidiscrimination Rights.P. Westen - 1990 - In Speaking of Equality: An Analysis of the Rhetorical Force of `Equality' in Moral and Legal Discourse. Princeton University Press. pp. 131-145.
  9.  7
    Reconsidering Genetic Antidiscrimination Legislation.Jon Beckwith & Joseph S. Alper - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):205-210.
    Until approximately twenty years ago, advances in the study of human genetics had little influence on the practice of medicine. In the 1980s, this changed dramatically with the mapping of the altered genes that cause cystic fibrosis and Huntington disease. In just a few years, these discoveries led to DNA-based tests that enabled clinicians to determine whether prospective parents were carriers of CF or whether an individual carried the Huntington gene and, as a result, would almost certainly develop the disease.Observers (...)
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  10. New York's Antidiscrimination Law.Frieda Wunderlich - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  11.  44
    Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation.Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty in (...)
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  12.  10
    Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination legislationRedundant Publication in Biomedical Sciences: Scientific Misconduct or Necessity?Joseph Alper & Jon Beckwith - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty in (...)
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  13.  25
    Commentary on “Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation” (J. S. Alper and J. Beckwith). [REVIEW]Robert Mullan Cook-Deegan - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):151-154.
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  14.  12
    Law and Norms in the Market Response to Discrimination in the Sharing Economy.Naomi Schoenbaum - 2019 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 13 (1):1-28.
    Sharing-economy firms have opposed the application of antidiscrimination law to their transactions. At the same time, these firms have heralded their ability to achieve antidiscrimination aims without the force of law, and have adopted various measures to address discrimination. This Article documents and assesses these measures, focusing on the relationship between law and norms. Relying on the sharing economy as a case study, this Article shows how law can play a crucial role in spurring antidiscrimination efforts by (...)
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  15.  40
    Subordiscriminación y discriminación interseccional: elementos para una teoría del derecho antidiscriminatorio.Dolores Morondo Taramundi - 2011 - Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 45:15 - 42.
    Thi s w or k i s pa r t o f a r e visio n i n p r o g r es s r e visitin g o f mode r n Antidiscrimination L a w tha t th e author s h a v e bee n ca r r yin g ou t o v e r th e las t f iftee n y ears . Th e f irs t pa r t (...)
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  16.  8
    The Imperative of Integration.Elizabeth Anderson - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    More than forty years have passed since Congress, in response to the Civil Rights Movement, enacted sweeping antidiscrimination laws in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. As a signal achievement of that legacy, in 2008, Americans elected their first African American president. Some would argue that we have finally arrived at a postracial America, butThe Imperative of Integration indicates otherwise. Elizabeth Anderson demonstrates that, despite progress toward (...)
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  17.  26
    Genetic Exceptionalism & Legislative Pragmatism.Mark A. Rothstein - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):27-33.
    : Can passing antidiscrimination laws ever be a bad idea? Yes, if broad policy reform is abandoned in favor of genetic-specific legislation. But in spite of its serious flaws, both in concept and in practice, genetic-specific legislation is sometimes worth passing anyway—sometimes a bad idea is reasonable.
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  18. Disparate Statistics.Kevin P. Tobia - 2017 - Yale Law Journal 126 (8):2382-2420.
    Statistical evidence is crucial throughout disparate impact’s three-stage analysis: during (1) the plaintiff’s prima facie demonstration of a policy’s disparate impact; (2) the defendant’s job-related business necessity defense of the discriminatory policy; and (3) the plaintiff’s demonstration of an alternative policy without the same discriminatory impact. The circuit courts are split on a vital question about the “practical significance” of statistics at Stage 1: Are “small” impacts legally insignificant? For example, is an employment policy that causes a one percent disparate (...)
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  19.  86
    Supreme Confusion About Causality at the Supreme Court.Robin Dembroff & Issa Kohler-Hausmann - forthcoming - CUNY Law Review.
    Twice in the 2020 term, in Bostock and Comcast, the Supreme Court doubled down on the reasoning of “but-for causation” to interpret antidiscrimination statutes. According to this reasoning, an outcome is discriminatory because of some status—say, sex or race—just in case the outcome would not have occurred “but-for” the plaintiff’s status. We think this reasoning embeds profound conceptual errors that render the decisions deeply confused. Furthermore, those conceptual errors tend to limit the reach of antidiscrimination law. In this (...)
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  20. Considering Quality of Life While Repudiating Disability Injustice: A Pathways Approach to Setting Priorities.Govind Persad - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):294-303.
    This article proposes a novel strategy, one that draws on insights from antidiscrimination law, for addressing a persistent challenge in medical ethics and the philosophy of disability: whether health systems can consider quality of life without unjustly discriminating against individuals with disabilities. It argues that rather than uniformly considering or ignoring quality of life, health systems should take a more nuanced approach. Under the article's proposal, health systems should treat cases where quality of life suffers because of disability-focused exclusion (...)
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  21.  4
    What is Data Justice? The Case for Connecting Digital Rights and Freedoms Globally.Linnet Taylor - 2017 - Big Data and Society 4 (2).
    The increasing availability of digital data reflecting economic and human development, and in particular the availability of data emitted as a by-product of people’s use of technological devices and services, has both political and practical implications for the way people are seen and treated by the state and by the private sector. Yet the data revolution is so far primarily a technical one: the power of data to sort, categorise and intervene has not yet been explicitly connected to a social (...)
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  22.  15
    Law, Economics, and Morality.Eyal Zamir & Barak Medina - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    Law, Economics, and Morality examines the possibility of combining economic methodology and deontological morality through explicit and direct incorporation of moral constraints into economic models. Economic analysis of law is a powerful analytical methodology. However, as a purely consequentialist approach, which determines the desirability of acts and rules solely by assessing the goodness of their outcomes, standard cost-benefit analysis is normatively objectionable. Moderate deontology prioritizes such values as autonomy, basic liberties, truth-telling, and promise-keeping over the promotion of good outcomes. It (...)
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  23. Intersectionality as a Regulative Ideal.Katherine Gasdaglis & Alex Madva - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    Appeals to intersectionality serve to remind us that social categories like race and gender cannot be adequately understood independently from each other. But what, exactly, is the intersectional thesis a thesis about? Answers to this question are remarkably diverse. Intersectionality is variously understood as a claim about the nature of social kinds, oppression, or experience ; about the limits of antidiscrimination law or identity politics ; or about the importance of fuzzy sets, multifactor analysis, or causal modeling in social (...)
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  24.  4
    Right-Wing Populism in New Turkey: Leading to All New Grounds for Troll Science in Gender Theory.Hande Eslen-Ziya - 2020 - Hts Theological Studies 76 (3).
    After years of progress in terms of gender and sexual rights, since 2012 Europe is facing a so-called gender backlash – opposition directed to issues related to reproductive policies and abortion, violence against women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer rights and gay marriages, gender mainstreaming and sex education at schools as well as antidiscrimination policies. In this article, firstly, by taking the anti-gender developments as point of reference, I examine the emergence of anti-gender movement in Europe via (...)
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  25.  42
    Understanding Disability Civil Rights Non-Categorically: The Minority Body and the Americans with Disabilities Act.Leslie Francis - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (5):1135-1149.
    A persistent paradox apparently infects disability civil rights claims. On the one hand, these rights claims are often understood to apply only to those who are sufficiently impaired in body or in mind to qualify for them because of the disadvantage they endure. On the other hand, asserting significant impairments threatens to undermine the plausibility of these claims as civil rights rather than as welfare for those who are dependent and in need of extra help. Behind this paradox lies a (...)
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  26.  71
    An Argument for Veganism.Stijn Bruers - 2016 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 78 (3):525-555.
    This article discusses the assumptions that are necessary to derive the conclusion that veganism - avoiding the use of animal products from conventional agriculture, hunting and fishing - is a moral duty. Using a formal-axiomatic framework, it is shown that twenty assumptions or axioms are sufficient to come to the conclusion. The argument is made as parsimonious as possible, using the weakest conditions, the most restrictive definitions and most reliable empirical facts. The argument assumes an antidiscrimination principle and a (...)
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  27.  29
    Beyond "Genetic Discrimination": Toward the Broader Harm of Geneticism.Susan M. Wolf - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (4):345-353.
    The current explosion of genetic knowledge and the rapid proliferation of genetic tests has rightly provoked concern that we are approaching a future in which people will be labeled and disadvantaged based on genetic information. Indeed, some have already suffered harm, including denial of health insurance. This concern has prompted an outpouring of analysis. Yet almost all of it approaches the problem of genetic disadvantage under the rubric of “genetic discrimination.”This rubric is woefully inadequate to the task at hand. It (...)
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  28.  55
    Basements and Intersections.Anna Carastathis - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):698-715.
    In this paper, I revisit Kimberlé Crenshaw's argument in “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex” (1989) to recover a companion metaphor that has been largely forgotten in the “mainstreaming” of intersectionality in (white-dominated) feminist theory. In addition to the now-famous intersection metaphor, Crenshaw offers the basement metaphor to show how—by privileging monistic, mutually exclusive, and analogically constituted categories of “race” and “sex” tethered, respectively, to masculinity and whiteness—antidiscrimination law functions to reproduce social hierarchy, rather than to remedy it, (...)
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  29.  13
    Race Beyond Our Borders: Is Racial and Ethnic Immigration Selection Always Morally Wrong?Sahar Akhtar - 2021 - Ethics 132 (2):322-351.
    Despite the seemingly widespread agreement that racial and ethnic immigration criteria are always wrong, some cases seem potentially permissible and, in particular, do not seem to wrong either disfavored members or nonmembers. I demonstrate that an “antidiscrimination” approach to understanding when and why discrimination is wrong provides a compelling general explanation for this. The explanation’s key ingredient is the concept of global social status: many groups sharing a race or ethnicity have a social status beyond, and that can differ (...)
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  30.  84
    Disability-Selective Abortion and the Americans with Disabilities Act.Christopher L. Griffin Jr & Dov Fox - unknown
    This Article examines the influence of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on affective attitudes toward children with disabilities and on the incidence of disability-selective abortion. Applying regression analysis to U.S. natality data, we find that the birthrate of children with Down syndrome declined significantly in the years following the ADA's passage. Controlling for technological, demographic, and cultural variables suggests that the ADA may have encouraged prospective parents to prevent the existence of the very class of people the Act was (...)
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  31.  68
    Superseding Historic Injustice and Territorial Rights.Cara Nine - 2008 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (1):79-87.
    Emotions situate actors in relationships and shape their social interactions. Culture defines both the qualities of individual identity and the constitution of social groups with distinctive values and practices. Emotions, then, are necessarily experienced and acted upon in culturally inflected forms that define not only the conventions of their articulation through individual and collective action, but also the very words that name them. This article develops theoretical arguments to support these claims and illustrates their application in a description of differing (...)
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  32.  23
    Disease Stigma in U.S. Public Health Law.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):179-190.
    Stigma has become an important concept in public health law. It is widely accepted that certain diseases are disfavored in society, leading to discrimination against people identified with them, which in turn has the tendency to drive an epidemic underground—i.e., to make it more difficult for voluntary public health programs to reach and succeed among populations bent on concealing their disease or risk status. The need to reduce stigma and its effects has been used to justify the passage of privacy (...)
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  33. How Ethical Is Investigative Testing?John T. Sanders - 1994 - Employment Testing Law and Policy Reporter 3 (2):17-23, 35.
    Analyzing three key cases that arose in 1993, I argue that the practice of sending in "testers" -- persons posing as job applicants -- to ferret out workplace discrimination is easier to defend from an ethical standpoint in an agency's investigation stems from an actual complaint. By contrast, defendants may rightfully challenge the legitimacy of the procedures used for "test" subjects when an investigation is based solely on the general goals of an antidiscrimination agency.
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  34.  85
    Conscientious Objection and Health Care: A Reply to Bernard Dickens.C. Kaczor - 2012 - Christian Bioethics 18 (1):59-71.
    Bernard Dickens seeks to undermine the legal and ethical protections accorded to health care workers and hospitals conscientiously objecting to abortion. First, he appeals to the rationale of antidiscrimination laws as a basis for arguing against conscientious objection. Second, he argues that conscientious objection undermines the rights of patients and their autonomy. Third, he holds that conscientiously objecting doctors have a duty to refer patients for abortion. Fourth, he believes that Kant’s principle of respect for humanity as an end (...)
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  35.  10
    Disease Stigma in U.S. Public Health Law.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):179-190.
    Stigma has become an important concept in public health law. It is widely accepted that certain diseases are disfavored in society, leading to discrimination against people identified with them, which in turn has the tendency to drive an epidemic underground—i.e., to make it more difficult for voluntary public health programs to reach and succeed among populations bent on concealing their disease or risk status. The need to reduce stigma and its effects has been used to justify the passage of privacy (...)
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  36.  17
    Vaccine Passports and Health Disparities: A Perilous Journey.Nancy S. Jecker - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107491.
    This paper raises health equity concerns about the use of passports for domestic and international travel to certify COVID-19 vaccination. Part I argues that for international travel, health equity objections undercut arguments defending vaccine passports, which are based on tholding people responsible, protecting global health, safeguarding individual liberty and continuing current practice. Part II entertains a proposal for a scaled down vaccine passport for domestic use in countries where vaccines are widely and equitably available. It raises health equity concerns related (...)
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  37.  8
    Evaluating the Quality of Informed Consent and Contemporary Clinical Practices by Medical Doctors in South Africa: An Empirical Study.Sylvester C. Chima - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (S1):S3.
    BackgroundThe issue of stigma is very important in the battle against HIV/aids in Africa since it may affect patient attendance at healthcare centres for obtaining antiretroviral medications and regular medical check-ups. Stigmatization creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear of victimization. This study was designed to determine if there is external stigmatization of people living with HIV and AIDS by health care workers at a tertiary hospital in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The study investigated (...)
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  38. Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Era of Identity Politics: Principled Compromises in a Compromised World.David Ingram - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Era of Identity Politics develops a critical theory of human rights and global democracy. Ingram both develops a theory of rights and applies it to a range of concrete and timely issues, such as the persistence of racism in contemporary American society; the emergence of so-called 'whiteness theory;' the failure of identity politics; the tensions between emphases on antidiscrimination and affirmative action in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990; the great unresolved issues (...)
     
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  39.  19
    Global Medicine: Is It Ethical or Morally Justifiable for Doctors and Other Healthcare Workers to Go on Strike?Sylvester C. Chima - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (S1):S5.
    BackgroundThe issue of stigma is very important in the battle against HIV/aids in Africa since it may affect patient attendance at healthcare centres for obtaining antiretroviral medications and regular medical check-ups. Stigmatization creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear of victimization. This study was designed to determine if there is external stigmatization of people living with HIV and AIDS by health care workers at a tertiary hospital in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The study investigated (...)
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  40.  14
    Equality at the Intersections: The Legislative and Judicial Failure to Tackle Multiple Discrimination.Sarah Hannett - 2003 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (1):65-86.
    This article examines how claimants alleging multiple discrimination, i.e. discrimination on the basis of two or more grounds, fare under existing antidiscrimination law. It argues that the current statutory regime, both conceptually and practically, hinders multiple discrimination claims. Specifically, the grounds of anti‐discrimination legislation may not adequately address an individual's experience of discrimination, leaving a claimant, or class of claimants, with no effective remedy. Further, in cases of both direct and indirect discrimination, claimants alleging multiple discrimination find it difficult (...)
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  41.  44
    Banning Parties: Religious and Ethnic Partisanship in Multicultural Democracies.Nancy L. Rosenblum - 2007 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 1 (1):17-75.
    One under-theorized aspect of "multiculturalism and the antidiscrimination principle" is religious and ethnicity based political parties. With political organization, the fact of pluralism is made concrete for democratic purposes. When the struggle for empowerment is "waged within the world of democratic politics" it is waged through parties. That is the associational form modern democracies have settled on for participation, representation, and governing, and for countervailing power and regular opposition. Particularist parties and bloc voting are key instruments of political conflict (...)
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  42.  10
    The Supreme Court Confronts HIV: Reflections on Bragdon V. Abbott.Wendy E. Parmet - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):225-240.
    The most remarkable thing about the U.S. Supreme Court's 1998 decision in Bragdon v. Abbott was that it was necessary at all. Seventeen years into the epidemic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, the Supreme Court, by a mere 5-4 majority, finally affirmed what most public health officials, health providers, and lawyers working with people with human immunodeficiency virus believed all along: that individuals with HIV infection are entitled to the protections of antidiscrimination law, and that health care providers must (...)
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  43.  5
    The Supreme Court Confronts HIV: Reflections on Bragdon V. Abbott.Wendy E. Parmet - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):225-240.
    The most remarkable thing about the U.S. Supreme Court's 1998 decision in Bragdon v. Abbott was that it was necessary at all. Seventeen years into the epidemic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, the Supreme Court, by a mere 5-4 majority, finally affirmed what most public health officials, health providers, and lawyers working with people with human immunodeficiency virus believed all along: that individuals with HIV infection are entitled to the protections of antidiscrimination law, and that health care providers must (...)
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  44.  21
    Up Against the Property Logic of Equality Law: Conservative Christian Accommodation Claims and Gay Rights. [REVIEW]Davina Cooper & Didi Herman - 2013 - Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):61-80.
    This paper explores conservative Christian demands that religious-based objections to providing services to lesbians and gay men should be accommodated by employers and public bodies. Focusing on a series of court judgments, alongside commentators’ critical accounts, the paper explores the dominant interpretation of the conflict as one involving two groups with deeply held, competing interests, and suggests this interpretation can be understood through a social property framework. The paper explores how religious beliefs and sexual orientation are attachments whose power has (...)
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  45.  33
    Disability Matters in Medical Law.K. Diesfeld - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):388-392.
    The British Parliament stated that health services would be covered by the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 . However, when people with disabilities are at their most vulnerable, for example when in hospital or subject to medical procedures, the antidiscrimination law fails them. A review of cases indicates that when people with disabilities are subject to medical treatment, the legislative protections are allowed to vanish. Instead, medical decisions are justified on obscure notions such as “best interests”, often with irreversible or (...)
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  46.  1
    Public Maternalism Goes to Market: Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion in Postsocialist Hungary.Éva Fodor & Christy Glass - 2011 - Gender and Society 25 (1):5-26.
    Under what conditions do motherhood penalties emerge in countries undergoing transition from state socialism to capitalism? This analysis identifies the ways managers in global financial firms employ gendered assumptions in constructing and implementing labor practices among highly skilled professional workers in Hungary. Relying on 33 in-depth interviews with employers as well as interviews with headhunting firms, labor and employment lawyers, and analysis of antidiscrimination cases brought before Hungary’s Equal Treatment Authority between 2004 and 2008, we identify several strategies global (...)
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  47.  3
    The Grounds and Demands of Public Recognition: How Religious Exemptions Corrode Civic Self-Respect.Jocelyn Wilson - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-25.
    I investigate the normative and conceptual account of the relationship between public recognition and dignitarian, or egalitarian, commitments. I do so through addressing the normative dispute, sparked by legal cases such as Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission and Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, as to whether there are dignitarian grounds for rejecting religious exemptions to antidiscrimination laws. I argue that there are such grounds. Specifically, I argue that, if granted, such exemptions would inflict dignitary harms against (...)
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  48.  17
    Stigmatization of People Living with HIV/Aids by Healthcare Workers at a Tertiary Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study.Temitayo O. Famoroti, Lucy Fernandes & Sylvester C. Chima - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (S1):S6.
    BackgroundThe issue of stigma is very important in the battle against HIV/aids in Africa since it may affect patient attendance at healthcare centres for obtaining antiretroviral medications and regular medical check-ups. Stigmatization creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear of victimization. This study was designed to determine if there is external stigmatization of people living with HIV and AIDS by health care workers at a tertiary hospital in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The study investigated (...)
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  49.  14
    Is Conditional Funding a Less Drastic Means?Moshe Cohen-Eliya - 2007 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 1 (1):354-381.
    In an age in which the regulatory state frequently deals with spending, licensing, and employment, the use of allocating powers is perceived as an appealing means by which to prevent discriminatory practices against individuals within illiberal communities. In addition to its easy availability, conditional funding is regarded as both an effective and—in comparison with legal prohibitions—less drastic tool for the prevention of discrimination. Such conditions are thought to be efficient because they increase the relative cost of the discriminatory practice and (...)
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  50. Feminism and the Political Economy of Representation : Intersectionality, Invisibility and Embodiment.Anna Carastathis - 2009 - Dissertation,
    It has become commonplace within feminist theory to claim that women’s lives are constructed by multiple, intersecting systems of oppression. In this thesis, I challenge the consensus that oppression is aptly captured by the theoretical model of “intersectionality.” While intersectionality originates in Black feminist thought as a purposive intervention into US antidiscrimination law, it has been detached from that context and harnessed to different representational aims. For instance, it is often asserted that intersectionality enables a representational politics that overcomes (...)
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