Results for 'Anthony Samuel'

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  1.  4
    The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08.Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (eds.) - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
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  2.  29
    Samuel Beckett and the Philosophical Image.Anthony Uhlmann - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Beckett often made use of images from the visual arts and readapted them, staging them in his plays, or using them in his fiction. Anthony Uhlmann sets out to explain how an image differs from other terms, like 'metaphor' or 'representation', and, in the process, to analyse Beckett's use of images borrowed from philosophy and aesthetics. This is the first study to carefully examine Beckett's thoughts on the image in his literary works and his extensive notes to the philosopher (...)
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  3.  8
    Non-Conscious Visual Cues Related to Affect and Action Alter Perception of Effort and Endurance Performance.Anthony Blanchfield, James Hardy & Samuele Marcora - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  4.  47
    Affirmative Action Policy and Changing Views.Anthony F. Libertella, Sebastian A. Sora & Samuel M. Natale - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):65-71.
    Critiquing any practice, theory, or law, requires understanding the characteristics of the environment which created a need for this law. There are hundreds of different cultures in the world, and each one has its own set of norms, characteristics, and values. What in one country is perceived normal, ethical or unethical, right or wrong, may not be the same somewhere else in the world. The first civilizations begun in Africa and Europe many thousands of years ago when people were hunters (...)
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  5.  16
    Fairtrade Towns as Unconventional Networks of Ethical Activism.Ken Peattie & Anthony Samuel - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):265-282.
    The growing availability and consumption of Fairtrade products is recognised as one of the most widespread ethically inspired market developments, and as an example of activist-driven change within the wider marketing system. The Fairtrade Towns movement, now operating in over 1700 towns and cities globally, represents a comparatively recent extension of Fairtrade marketing driven by local activists seeking to promote positive change in production and consumption systems. This paper briefly explores the conventional framing of the role that ethically related activism (...)
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  6.  13
    For-Profit Education: The Sleep of Ethical Reason.Samuel M. Natale, Anthony F. Libertella & Caroline J. Doran - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):1-7.
    This article argues the philosophical concerns and foundational challenges raised by a for-profit model of education. The for-profit model is governed by a business paradigm, without reference to the context in which it is found. The authors explore primary ethical questions and challenges presented by this model. As such, they present potential solutions to the growing problem in higher education as a corporate entity. The authors introduce a potential model for analysis of the issues and suggest an interventional technique with (...)
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  7.  20
    Higher Education and Wealth Equity: Calibrating the Moral Compass Empathy, Ethics, and the Trained Will.Samuel M. Natale & Anthony F. Libertella - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):35-47.
    This paper will argue the importance of the creation of a moral compass, driven by empathy and a rigorously trained will in higher education leadership to develop a tighter relationship between higher education and wealth equity. We will explore the foundational documents that first discussed these issues within a global context. Further, We explore how these goals, enhanced by insights promulgated by the United Nations, can be achieved by teaching empathy, developing a moral compass and training the will.
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  8.  24
    Education-Business Partnership: Shifting Sands in the University and Corporate Community. [REVIEW]Samuel M. Natale & Anthony F. Libertella - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2):257-268.
  9. Samuel Scolnikov, Plato's Metaphysics of Education. [REVIEW]Anthony Preus - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9:496-498.
     
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  10. 2 Samuel.Anthony F. Campbell - 2005
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  11.  15
    BERGSTEIN, MARY. Mirrors of Memory.(Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press). 2010. Pp. 335.£ 18.95 (Hbk). BOYLAN, MICHAEL and JOHNSON, CHARLES. Philosophy: An Innovative Introduction.(Boulder: Westview Press). 2010. Pp. 344. $50.00 (Pbk). [REVIEW]Anthony Bryant, Griselda Pollock, Patrizia di Bello, Gabriel Koureas, Jason Edwards, Imogen Hart, Lars Ellestrom, Samb Girgus, Joseph Margolis & Peggy Samuels - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3).
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  12. Samuel Scolnikov, Plato's Metaphysics of Education Reviewed By.Anthony Preus - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (12):496-498.
     
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  13.  2
    The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08.William L. Uzgalis (ed.) - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke’s view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
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  14.  46
    Anthony F. D'Elia, The Renaissance of Marriage in Fifteenth-Century Italy. (Harvard Historical Studies, 146.) Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 262. $49.95. [REVIEW]Samuel Cohn Jr - 2006 - Speculum 81 (1):169-170.
  15.  9
    1 Samuel.Marc Z. Brettler & Anthony F. Campbell - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (1):203.
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  16.  20
    The Life of Samuel of Kalamun. Isaac the Presbyter, Anthony Alcock.L. S. B. MacCoull - 1986 - Speculum 61 (4):938-940.
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  17.  5
    For Prince and Townsmen: An Elegy by Anthonis de Roovere on the Death of Charles the Bold.Samuel Mareel - 2006 - Mediaevalia 27 (2):59-74.
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  18.  1
    Exploring and Expanding Supererogatory Acts: Beyond Duty for a Sustainable Future.Gareth R. T. White, Anthony Samuel & Robert J. Thomas - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Supererogation has gained attention as a means of explaining the voluntary behaviours of individuals and organizations that are done for the benefit of others and which go above what is required of legislation and what may be expected by society. Whilst the emerging literature has made some significant headway in exploring supererogation as an ethical lens for the study of business there remain several important issues that require attention. These comprise, the lack of primary evidence upon which such examinations have (...)
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  19. The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-1708, Edited by William L. Uzgalis.Jacopo Agnesina - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 67 (3):651.
  20.  46
    Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter & Ezio Vailati - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First published Sat Apr 5, 2003; most recent substantive revision Wed Aug 22, 2018. -/- Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) was the most influential British philosopher in the generation between Locke and Berkeley. His philosophical interests were mostly in metaphysics, theology, and ethics.
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  21.  4
    Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter - 2021 - In Charles Taliaferro & Stewart Goetz (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Religion.
    A decade after developing a modal cosmological argument for God's existence and attributes, Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) debated Leibniz on miracles, divine freedom, and the nature of the world. Clarke's theories of freedom, divine activity, the soul, and ethics influenced Joseph Butler, Jonathan Edwards, David Hume, Thomas Reid, and many others. His attacks on the materialism, pantheism, and “atheism” of Thomas Hobbes, Spinoza, John Toland, Anthony Collins, and the deists were interwoven with his defenses of Newtonian natural philosophy, which (...)
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  22.  3
    Editors' Announcement.Charles Capper, Anthony La Vopa & Samuel Moyn - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):265-265.
  23. Recueil de Diverses Pieces, Sur la Philosophie, la Religion Naturelle, l'Histoire, les Mathematiques, &C.Pierre Desmaizeaux, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Anthony Collins, Samuel Clarke & Isaac Newton - 1740 - Chez François Changuion.
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  24.  68
    Anthony Collins on the Status of Consciousness.Vili Lähteenmäki - 2014 - Vivarium 52 (3-4):315-332.
    Anthony Collins (1676-1729) maintains that consciousness might be a material process or result from material processes. On the one hand, Collins accepts Locke’s view that from consciousness, i.e., the activity of thinking, we acquire no knowledge about the nature of the thinking substance. On the other, he takes seriously Samuel Clarke’s challenge that the thinking substance must be suitably unified because consciousness is unified. In this paper, I argue that, throughout his correspondence with Clarke, Collins maintains that consciousness (...)
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  25.  15
    Between Philology and Radical Enlightenment: Hermann Samuel Reimarus (1694–1768).Anthony Ossa-Richardson - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (2):304-306.
  26.  57
    Anthony Collins on the Emergence of Consciousness and Personal Identity.William Uzgalis - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (2):363-379.
    The correspondence between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins of 1706–8, while not well known, is a spectacularly good debate between a dualist and a materialist over the possibility of giving a materialist account of consciousness and personal identity. This article puts the Clarke Collins Correspondence in a broader context in which it can be better appreciated, noting that it is really a debate between John Locke and Anthony Collins on one hand, and Samuel Clarke and Joseph (...)
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  27.  12
    Medial Temporal Lobe Roles in Human Path Integration.Yamamoto Naohide, Philbeck John, Woods Adam, Gajewski Daniel, Arthur Joeanna, Potolicchio Samuel, Levy Lucien & Caputy Anthony - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  28.  49
    Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority From Luther to Pufendorf:Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority Martin Luther, John Calvin, Harro Hopfl; The Radical Reformation Michael G. Baylor; Political Writings Francisco de Vitoria, Anthony Pagden, Jeremy Lawrance; Patriarcha and Other Writings Robert Filmer, Johann P. Sommerville; On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law Samuel Pufendorf, James Tully, Michael Silverthorne.Michael Seidler - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):551-.
  29. A Collection of Papers, Which Passed Between the Late Learned Mr. Leibnitz and Dr. Clarke in the Years 1715 and 1716 Relating to the Principles of Natural Philosophy and Religion : With an Appendix : To Which Are Added, Letters to Dr. Clarke Concerning Liberty and Necessity, From a Gentleman of the University of Cambridge, with the Doctor's Answers to Them : Also, Remarks Upon a Book, Entituled, a Philosophical Enquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW]Samuel Clarke & Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1717 - Printed for James Knapton.
  30.  37
    Expression and Affect in Kleist, Beckett and Deleuze.Anthony Uhlmann - 2009 - In Laura Cull (ed.), Deleuze and Performance. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 54--71.
    This chapter examines the concepts of expression and affect in the works of Heinrich von Kleist, Samuel Beckett, and Gilles Deleuze. It suggests that Kleist, Beckett, and Edward Gordon-Craig belong a minor tradition of acting and explains that this minor tradition is one that aims to create a theatre which moves away from the inner world of an actor in favour of developing affects which express an external composite world. It also analyses Kleist's short story ‘On the Marionette Theatre’ (...)
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  31. The Ethiopian Campaign and French Political Thought.Anthony O. Simon & Robert Royal (eds.) - 2009 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    "While it is true that Yves R. Simon did not intend this to be a history book, __The Ethiopian Campaign and French Political Thought __is an important historical work well deserving of a close reading by students of twentieth-century European history and international relations. This book, which finds a worthy English translation after too many years, was Simon's first serious foray into the public square on the side of justice and the common good. Simon's analysis is wide-ranging, incisive, and brimming (...)
     
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  32.  26
    New Terms of Envatment.Samuel Montplaisir - 2013 - Ithaque 12:77-87.
    The argument against skepticism relying on content externalism, which was made famous by Hilary Putnam, has been considered inconclusive by many philosophers. However, some believe that this argument has precluded the possibility of skeptical hypotheses. These hypotheses typically are fictional scenarios where a deceptive power makes your experiences indistinguishable from those you would have if you were not in such a scenario, making most of your justified belief false. Some philosophers, such as Anthony Brueckner and Jon Altschul, have taken (...)
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  33.  31
    Ethics And The Individuation Of The Self: Royce's “Dash Of Fichte”.Anthony Perovich - 2016 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):166.
    On the evening of August 30, 1895, Josiah Royce addressed the Philosophical Union of his alma mater, the University of California at Berkeley, taking as his topic “The Conception of God.” Also speaking that evening were Royce’s former professor, Joseph LeConte, and his former student, Samuel Mezes, but his severest critic at the podium was the organizer of the event, Royce’s friend and rival, George Holmes Howison. In this “battle of the giants,” as the newspaper descriptions characterized it,1 Howison (...)
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  34.  22
    Revisiting the Question: Is Anthony Collins the Author of the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity?Jonathan S. Marko - 2010 - Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):77-104.
    In this article I argue that the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Neces­sity should be attributed to Anthony Collins. This was the prevailing view until the publication of James O’Higgins’s 1970 biography of Collins. Since then, most have followed Collins’s modern-day biographer in denying that Collins penned the Dissertation. After reviewing O’Higgins’s six reasons for rejecting Collins as the author, I respond to the substantive issues in what follows. Part I is a historical positioning of the Clarke-Collins liberty-necessity debate (...)
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  35.  19
    Revisiting the Question: Is Anthony Collins the Author of the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity?Jonathan S. Marko - 2010 - Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):77-104.
    In this article I argue that the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Neces­sity should be attributed to Anthony Collins. This was the prevailing view until the publication of James O’Higgins’s 1970 biography of Collins. Since then, most have followed Collins’s modern-day biographer in denying that Collins penned the Dissertation. After reviewing O’Higgins’s six reasons for rejecting Collins as the author, I respond to the substantive issues in what follows. Part I is a historical positioning of the Clarke-Collins liberty-necessity debate (...)
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  36.  1
    Holding One's Time in Thought: The Political Philosophy of W.J. Stankiewicz.Bogdan Czaykowski & Samuel Victor LaSelva (eds.) - 1997 - Ronsdale Press.
    This collection of essays evolved from a colloquium held at the University of British Columbia in 1995 to honour the eminent political scientist and aphorist W.J. Stankiewicz. A theorist and consultant on political decisions, Stankiewicz has been noted for his ability to bring the classical concepts of political science into the decision-making rooms of everyday political action. Among the distinguished Canadian and American contributors are Alan Cairns, Jean Bethke Elshtain, George Feaver, Barry Cooper, Anthony Parel, Arpad Kadarkay and Ian (...)
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  37. Hume’s Treatise and the Clarke-Collins Controversy.Paul Russell - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (1):95-115.
    The philosophy of Samuel Clarke is of central importance to Hume’s Treatise. Hume’s overall attitude to Clarke’s philosophy may be characterized as one of systematic scepticism. The general significance of this is that it sheds considerable light on Hume’s fundamental “atheistic” or anti-Christian intentions in the Treatise. These are all claims that I have argued for elsewhere.’ In this paper I am concerned to focus on a narrower aspect of this relationship between the philosophies of Clarke and Hume. Specifically, (...)
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  38. The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke-Collins Correspondenc.Marleen Rozemond - 2008 - In Tom Lennon & Robert Stainton (eds.), The Achilles of Rational Psychology.
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think, or be conscious. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the subject of the mental against Anthony Collins’ materialism. This paper examines important assumptions about the nature of body that play a role in their debate. Clarke argued that consciousness requires an “individual being”, an entity with some sort of significant unity as its subject. They agree (...)
     
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  39.  22
    Clarke's Rejection of Superadded Gravity in the Clarke-Collins Correspondence.L. B. Wolf - 2019 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 36 (3):237-255.
    In the past, experts have disagreed about whether Samuel Clarke accepted the idea that gravity is a power superadded to matter by God. Most scholars now agree that Clarke did not support superaddition. But the argumentation employed by Clarke to reject superaddition has not been studied before in detail. In this paper, I explicate Clarke's argumentation by relating it to an important discussion about the possibility of superadded gravity in the Clarke-Collins correspondence. I examine Clarke's responses to Collins and (...)
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  40.  77
    Shaftesbury and the Modern Problem of Virtue.Douglas J. Den Uyl - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):275.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury, was the grandson of the First Earl of Shaftesbury. The First Earl, along with John Locke, was a leader and founder of the Whig movement in Britain. Locke was the First Earl's secretary and also the tutor of the Third Earl. Both the First and Third Earls were members of parliament and supporters of Whig causes. Although both the First and Third Earls were involved in politics, the Third Earl is better (...)
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  41.  15
    Shaftesbury and the Modern Problem of Virtue*: Douglas J. Den Uyl.Douglas J. Den Uyl - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):275-316.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury, was the grandson of the First Earl of Shaftesbury. The First Earl, along with John Locke, was a leader and founder of the Whig movement in Britain. Locke was the First Earl's secretary and also the tutor of the Third Earl. Both the First and Third Earls were members of parliament and supporters of Whig causes. Although both the First and Third Earls were involved in politics, the Third Earl is better (...)
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  42. Moral Rationalism Vs. Moral Sentimentalism: Is Morality More Like Math or Beauty?Michael B. Gill - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):16–30.
    One of the most significant disputes in early modern philosophy was between the moral rationalists and the moral sentimentalists. The moral rationalists — such as Ralph Cudworth, Samuel Clarke and John Balguy — held that morality originated in reason alone. The moral sentimentalists — such as Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury, Francis Hutcheson and David Hume — held that morality originated at least partly in sentiment. In addition to arguments, the rationalists and sentimentalists developed rich (...)
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  43. Du Châtelet on Freedom, Self-Motion, and Moral Necessity.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2):255-280.
    This paper explores the theory of freedom that Emilie du Châtelet advances in her essay “On Freedom.” Using contemporary terminology, we can characterize this theory as a version of agent-causal compatibilism. More specifically, the theory has the following elements: (a) freedom consists in the power to act in accordance with one’s choices, (b) freedom requires the ability to suspend desires and master passions, (c) freedom requires a power of self-motion in the agent, and (d) freedom is compatible with moral necessity (...)
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  44. Can Matter Think? The Mind-Body Problem in the Clarke-Collins Correspondence.Marleen Rozemond - 2009 - In Jon Miller (ed.), Topics in Early Modern Philosophy of Mind. Springer.
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the human soul against Anthony Collins’ materialism. Clarke argues that consciousness must belong to an indivisible entity, and matter is divisible. Collins contends that consciousness could belong to a composite subject by emerging from material qualities that belong to its parts. While many early modern thinkers assumed that this is (...)
     
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  45.  32
    The Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity: Genealogy of a Debate in Genetics.Antonine Nicoglou - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 50:67-76.
    The paper describes the context and the origin of a particular debate that concerns the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. In 1965, British biologist A. D. Bradshaw proposed a widely cited model intended to explain the evolution of norms of reaction, based on his studies of plant populations. Bradshaw’s model went beyond the notion of the “adaptive norm of reaction” discussed before him by Dobzhansky and Schmalhausen by suggesting that “plasticity” the ability of a phenotype to be modified by the environment (...)
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  46.  68
    Clarke, Collins and Compounds.Robin Attfield - unknown
    Can room be found in between the matter and void of a Newtonian universe for an immaterial and immortal soul? Can followers of Locke with his agnosticism about the nature of substances claim to know that some of them are immaterial? Samuel Clarke, well versed in Locke's thought and a defender both of Newtonian science and Christian orthodoxy, believed he could do both and attempted to prove his case by means of some hard-boiled reductionism. Anthony Collins, a deist (...)
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  47.  50
    Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy.Joel Feinberg - 1965 - Dickenson Pub. Co..
    Joel Feinberg : In Memoriam. Preface. Part I: INTRODUCTION TO THE NATURE AND VALUE OF PHILOSOPHY. 1. Joel Feinberg: A Logic Lesson. 2. Plato: "Apology." 3. Bertrand Russell: The Value of Philosophy. PART II: REASON AND RELIGIOUS BELIEF. 1. The Existence and Nature of God. 1.1 Anselm of Canterbury: The Ontological Argument, from Proslogion. 1.2 Gaunilo of Marmoutiers: On Behalf of the Fool. 1.3 L. Rowe: The Ontological Argument. 1.4 Saint Thomas Aquinas: The Five Ways, from Summa Theologica. 1.5 (...) Clarke: A Modern Formulation of the Cosmological Argument. 1.6 William L. Rowe: The Cosmological Argument. 1.7 William Paley: The Argument from Design. 1.8 Michael Ruse: The Design Argument. 1.9 David Hume: Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. 2. The Problem of Evil. 2.1 Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Rebellion. 2.2 J. L. Mackie: Evil and Omnipotence. 2.3 Peter van Inwagen: The Argument from Evil. 2.4 Michael Murray and Michael Rea: The Argument from Evil. 2.5 B. C. Johnson: God and the Problem of Evil. 3. Reason and Faith. 3.1 W. K. Clifford: The Ethics of Belief. 3.2 William James: The Will to Believe. 3.3 Kelly James Clark: Without Evidence or Argument. 3.4 Blaise Pascal: The Wager. 3.5 Lawrence Shapiro: Miracles and Justification. 3.6 Simon Blackburn: Infini-Rien. Part III. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE: ITS GROUNDS AND LIMITS. 1. Skepticism. 1.1 John Pollock: A Brain in a Vat. 1.2 Michael Huemer: Three Skeptical Arguments. 1.3 Robert Audi: Skepticism. 2. The Nature and Value of Knowledge. 2.1 Plato: Knowledge as Justified True Belief. 2.2 Edmund Gettier: Is Justified True Belief Knowledge? 2.3 James Cornman, Keith Lehrer, and George Pappas: An Analysis of Knowledge. 2.4 Gilbert Ryle: Knowing How and Knowing That. 2.5 Plato: "Meno". 2.6 Linda Zagzebski, Epistemic Good and The Good Life. 3. Our Knowledge of the External World. 3.1 Bertrand Russell: Appearance and Reality and the Existence of Matter. 3.2 René Descartes: Meditations on First Philosophy. 3.3 John Locke: The Causal Theory of Perception. 3.4 George Berkeley: Of the Principles of Human Knowledge. 3.5 G. E. Moore: Proof of an External World. 4. The Methods of Science. 4.1 David Hume: An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding. 4.2 Wesley C. Salmon: An Encounter with David Hume. 4.3 Karl Popper: Science: Conjectures and Refutations. 4.4 Philip Kitcher: Believing Where We Cannot Prove. Part IV: MIND AND ITS PLACE IN NATURE. 1. The Mind-Body Problem. 1.1 Brie Gertler: In Defense of Mind--Body Dualism. 1.2 Frank Jackson: The Qualia Problem. 1.3 David Papineau: The Case for Materialism. 1.4 Paul Churchland: Functionalism and Eliminative Materialism. 2. Can Non-Humans Think? 2.1 Alan Turing: Computing Machinery and Intelligence. 2.2 John R. Searle: Minds, Brains, and Programs. 2.3 William G. Lycan: Robots and Minds. 3. Personal Identity and the Survival of Death. 3.1 John Locke: The Prince and the Cobbler. 3.2 Thomas Reid: Of Mr. Locke’s Account of Our Personal Identity. 3.3 David Hume: The Self. 3.4 Derek Parfit: Divided Minds and the Nature of Persons. 3.5 Shelly Kagan: What Matters. 3.6 John Perry: A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality. Part V: DETERMINISM, FREE WILL, AND RESPONSIBILITY. 1. Libertarianism: The Case for Free Will and Its Incompatibility with Determinism. 1.1 Roderick M. Chisholm: Human Freedom and the Self. 1.2 Robert Kane: Free Will: Ancient Dispute, New Themes. 2. Hard Determinism: The Case for Determinism and its Incompatibility with Its Incompatibility with Any Important Sense of Free Will. 2.1 James Rachels: The case against Free Will. 2.2 Derk Pereboom: Why We Have No Free Will and Can Live Without It. 3. Compatibilism: The Case for Determinism and Its Compatibility with the Most Important Sense of Free Will. 3.1 David Hume: Of Liberty and Necessity. 3.2 Helen Beebee: Compatibilism and the Ability to do Otherwise. 4. Freedom and Moral Responsibility. 4.1 Galen Strawson: Luck Swallows Everything. 4.2 Harry Frankfurt: Alternate Possibilities and Moral Responsibility. 4.3 Thomas Nagel: Moral Luck. 4.4 Susan Wolf: Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility. Part VI: MORALITY AND ITS CRITICS. 1. Changes to Morality. 1.1 Joel Feinberg: Psychological Egoism. 1.2 Plato: The Immoralist’s Challenge. 1.3 Friedrich Nietzche: Master and Slave Morality. 1.4 Richard Joyce: The Evolutionary Debunking of Morality. 2. Proposed Standards and Right of Conduct. 2.1 Russ Shafer-Landau: Ethical Subjectivism. 2.2 Mary Midgley: Trying Out One’s New Sword. 2.3 Aristotle: Virtue and the Good Life. 2.4 Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan. 2.5 Plato: Euthyphro. 2.6 Immanuel Kant: The Good Will and the Categorical Imperative. 2.7 J.S. Mill: Utilitarianism, Chapters 2 and 4. 2.8 W. D. Ross: What Makes Right Acts Right? 2.9 Hilde Lindemann: What Is Feminist Ethics? 3. Ethical Problems. 3.1 Kwame Anthony Appiah: What Will Future Generations Condemn Us For? 3.2 Peter Singer: Famine, Affluence and Morality. 3.3 John Harris: The Survival Lottery. 3.4 James Rachels: Active and Passive Euthanasia. 3.5 Mary Anne Warren: The Moral and Legal Status of Abortion. 3.6 Don Marquis: Why Abortion Is Immoral. 4. The Meaning of Life. 4.1 Epicurus: Letter to Menoeceus. 4.2 Richard Taylor: The Meaning of Life. 4.3 Richard Kraut: Desire and the Human Good. 4.4 Leo Tolstoy: My Confession. 4.5 Susan Wolf: Happiness and Meaning. 4.6 Thomas Nagel: The Absurd. (shrink)
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  48.  4
    Philosophical Perspectives on Punishment.Gertrude Ezorsky (ed.) - 1972 - State University of New York Press.
    “Punishment,” writes J. E. McTaggart, “ is pain and to inflict pain on any person obviously [requires] justification.” But if the need to justify punishment is obvious, the manner of doing so is not. Philosophers have developed an array of diverse, often conflicting arguments to justify punitive institutions. Gertrude Ezorsky introduces this source book of significant historical and contemporary philosophical writings on problems of punishment with her own article, “The Ethics of Punishment.” She brings together systematically the important papers and (...)
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  49.  71
    Conversations with Anthony Giddens: Making Sense of Modernity.Anthony Giddens & Christopher Pierson - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    In this series of extended interviews with Chris Pierson, Giddens lays out the principal themes in the development of his social theory and the distinctive political agenda which he recommends.
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  50.  14
    Mind and Matter.Aaron Garrett - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 171.
    This chapter explores several episodes in the eighteenth-century discussion of the metaphysics of mind. It begins with Locke’s suggestion that it would not be impossible for God to “superadd” the power of thought to matter. It then describes the debate about Locke’s suggestion between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, and considers Hume’s discussion of the immateriality of the soul in relation to that debate. Next it presents Berkeley’s philosophy of immaterialism as a way of protecting the mental from (...)
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