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  1.  69
    What's in a name for memory errors? Implications and ethical issues arising from the use of the term "false memory" for errors in memory for details.Anne P. DePrince, Carolyn B. Allard, Hannah Oh & Jennifer J. Freyd - 2004 - Ethics and Behavior 14 (3):201 – 233.
    The term "false memories" has been used to refer to suggestibility experiments in which whole events are apparently confabulated and in media accounts of contested memories of childhood abuse. Since 1992 psychologists have increasingly used the term "false memory" when discussing memory errors for details, such as specific words within word lists. Use of the term to refer to errors in details is a shift in language away from other terms used historically (e.g., "memory intrusions"). We empirically examine this shift (...)
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  2.  67
    What's the risk in asking? Participant reaction to trauma history questions compared with reaction to other personal questions.Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease - 2006 - Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings compared to other kinds (...)
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