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Anne O'Byrne [12]Anne Elizabeth O'Byrne [2]
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Anne O'Byrne
State University of New York, Stony Brook
  1.  23
    Natality and Finitude.Anne O'Byrne - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    Philosophers are accustomed to thinking about human existence as finite and deathbound. Anne O'Byrne focuses instead on birth as a way to make sense of being alive. Building on the work of Heidegger, Dilthey, Arendt, and Nancy, O'Byrne discusses how the world becomes ours and how meaning emerges from our relations to generations past and to come. Themes such as creation, time, inheritance, birth and action, embodiment, biological determinism, and cloning anchor this sensitive and powerful analysis. O'Byrne's thinking advances and (...)
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  2.  18
    50 Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology, edited by Gail Weiss, Anne V. Murphy, and Gayle Salamon (Book Review Article).Anne O'Byrne - 2020 - Puncta 3 (1):28.
    Book review for 50 Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology, edited by Gail Weiss, Anne V. Murphy, and Gayle Salamon (2020).
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  3.  26
    Communitas and the problem of women.Anne O'Byrne - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (3):125-138.
    From its earliest beginnings, political thought has grappled with the problem of those who both do and do not belong to the city, those who cannot be exactly included or excluded, that is to say, with the problem of difference. Most often this emerges first as the problem of what to do with women. Communitas is an intense engagement with central figures in the history of political thought – Augustine, Hobbes, Rousseau – but also a remarkably efficient avoidance of women (...)
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  4. Améry, Arendt, and the Future of the World.Anne O'Byrne - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (3):128-139.
    Of all the terms Jean Améry might have chosen to explain the deepest effects of torture, the one he selected was world. To be tortured was to lose trust in the world, to become incapable of feeling at home in the world. In July 1943, Améry was arrested by the Gestapo in Belgium and tortured by the SS at the former fortress of Breendonk. With the first blow from the torturers, he famously wrote, one loses trust in the world. With (...)
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  5.  10
    Introduction to the Special Issue.Adam Blair & Anne O'Byrne - 2021 - Puncta 4 (2):1-4.
    The Collegium Phaenomenologicum has met in Umbria, Italy every summer since 1976; only COVID made it pause, and hopefully only temporarily. It has been a forum for deep and broad discussion of the phenomenological tradition; it has also been a place where that tradition has itself been broadened and deepened by generations of thinkers who came to study the classical texts and to do phenomenology. In 2019, over the course of three weeks in July, in three lecture courses, several talks (...)
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  6.  38
    Being mine.Anne O'Byrne - 1999 - Research in Phenomenology 29 (1):239-248.
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  7.  13
    Even Now There Are Places Where a Thought Might Grow—.Anne O'Byrne - 2022 - Puncta 5 (2):105-112.
    The world is full of unattended nooks, places known to no one living, places hidden from all but a few, places unheard-of, not quite remembered, yet to be discovered or rediscovered, places vastly remote and others close to where we are right now. That is to say, the world is riddled with contingency. It is a condition of worldliness, merely the case, neither here nor there. But among those sites are places haunted by suffering, even cruelty, and our not knowing (...)
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  8.  46
    Heidegger and practical philosophy.Anne O'Byrne - 2003 - Continental Philosophy Review 36 (3):344-350.
  9.  8
    Logics of Genocide: The Structures of Violence and the Contemporary World.Anne O'Byrne & Martin Shuster - 2020 - Routledge.
    This book is concerned with the connection between the formal structure of agency and the formal structure of genocide. The contributors employ philosophical approaches to explore the idea of genocidal violence as a structural element in the world. Do mechanisms or structures in nation-states produce types of national citizens that are more susceptible to genocidal projects? There are powerful arguments within philosophy that in order to be the subjects of our own lives, we must constitute ourselves specifically as national subjects (...)
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  10.  15
    Possible.Anne O'Byrne - 2019 - Philosophy Today 63 (1):243-253.
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  11.  11
    Subjects and Simulations: Between Baudrillard and Lacoue-Labarthe.Anne Elizabeth O'Byrne & Hugh J. Silverman (eds.) - 2014 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Subjects and Simulations presents essays focused on suffering and sublimity, representation and subjectivity, and the relation of truth and appearance through engagement with the legacies of Jean Baudrillard and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe.
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  12. Traumatized sovereignty.Anne O'Byrne - 2007 - In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.
     
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  13. The task of knowledgeable love : Arendt and Portmann in search of meaning.Anne O'Byrne - 2017 - In Roger Berkowitz & Ian Storey (eds.), Artifacts of Thinking: Reading Hannah Arendt's Denktagebuch. Fordham University Press.