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Andrew Gregory
University of London
  1.  6
    Plato’s Philosophy of Science.Andrew Gregory - 2000 - Duckworth.
    Seeking to reassess Plato's views on how we might investigate and explain the natural world, this book argues that many of the common charges against Plato (disinterest, ignorance, dismissal of observation) are unfounded, and that Plato had a series of important and cogent criticisms of the early atomists and other physiologoi. His views on science, and on astronomy and cosmology in particular, develop in interesting ways. It also argues that Plato can best be seen as someone who is struggling with (...)
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  2.  43
    Parmenides, Cosmology and Sufficient Reason.Andrew Gregory - 2013 - Apeiron (1):1-32.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  3.  56
    Harvey, Aristotle and the Weather Cycle.Andrew Gregory - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (1):153-168.
    It is well known that Harvey was influenced by Aristotle. This paper seeks to show that Harvey's quantitative argument for the circulation and his analogy of the heart with a pump do not go beyond Aristotle and may even have been inspired by passages in Aristotle. It also considers the fact that Harvey gives much greater prominence to a macrocosm/microcosm analogy between the weather cycle and the circulation of the blood than he does to the pump analogy. This analogy is (...)
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  4.  10
    Francesca Alesse;, Franco Ferrari . Epinomide: Studi sull'opera e la sua ricezione. 539 pp., indexes. Naples: Bibliopolis, 2012. €50. [REVIEW]Andrew Gregory - 2014 - Isis 105 (3):630-631.
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  5.  41
    Creationism - Sedley Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity. Pp. Xviii + 269. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2007. Cased, £17.95, US$29.95. ISBN: 978-0-520-25364-3. [REVIEW]Andrew Gregory - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):364-366.
  6.  14
    Kennedy and Stichometry–Some Methodological Considerations.Andrew Gregory - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (2):157-179.
  7.  29
    Aristotle's Cosmology Kouremenos Heavenly Stuff. The Constitution of the Celestial Objects and the Theory of Homocentric Spheres in Aristotle's Cosmology. Pp. 150. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2010. Cased, €38. ISBN: 978-3-515-09733-8. [REVIEW]Andrew Gregory - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):414-415.
  8.  41
    Aristotle, Dynamics and Proportionality.Andrew Gregory - 2001 - Early Science and Medicine 6 (1):1-21.
    What ought we to make of Aristotle's apparently disparate comments on bodies in motion? I argue that Aristotle is concerned with a higher level project than dynamics and that is the establishment of a coherent theory of change in general. This theory is designed to avoid the paradoxes and infinities that Aristotle finds in Eleatic, Heraclitean and atomist accounts, notably in relation to comparatives such as 'quicker' and 'slower'. This theory relies on a broad application of proportionality to all types (...)
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  9.  19
    Aspects of Collecting in Renaissance Padua: A Bust of Socrates for Niccolò Leonico Tomeo.Jonathan Woolfson & Andrew Gregory - 1995 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 58:252-265.
  10.  10
    Robert P. Crease. The Great Equations: Breakthroughs in Science From Pythagoras to Heisenberg. 315 Pp., Illus., Index. New York: W. W. Norton, 2008. $25.95. [REVIEW]Andrew Gregory - 2010 - Isis 101 (3):626-627.
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  11.  58
    Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic.Andrew Gregory - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I suggest, been (...)
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