79 found
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  1.  44
    The credentials of brain-based learning.Andrew Davis - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):21–36.
    This paper discusses the current fashion for brain-based learning, in which value-laden claims about learning are grounded in neurophysiology. It argues that brain science cannot have the ‘authority’ about learning that some seek to give it. It goes on to discuss whether the claim that brain science is relevant to learning involves a category mistake. The heart of the paper tries to show how the contribution of brain science to our grasp of the nature of learning is limited in principle. (...)
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  2.  40
    Criterion-referenced assessment and the development of knowledge and understanding.Andrew Davis - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):3–21.
    The paper argues that no criterion-referenced assessment system can achieve both reliability and validity at one and the same time. It shows that the reasons for this are conceptual, and hence that empirical research into the‘problem’ is a waste of money and effort. Considerable discussion is devoted to ideas of knowledge and understanding, and to proper educational objectives pertaining to these. Much reference is made to the current National Curriculum context in the United Kingdom, and conclusions are drawn for appropriate (...)
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  3.  20
    Prescribing teaching methods.Andrew Davis - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (3):387–401.
    Teachers are no longer simply being told what to teach, but also how to teach it. It is important therefore to examine whether some prescriptions of teaching methods are acceptable while others are not, and to justify opposition to certain forms of prescription. I show that some attempts to prescribe teaching methods are either empty, or incompatible with holding teachers to account for the pupil learning which is supposed to result. My argument does not depend on making any value assumptions (...)
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  4.  33
    To read or not to read: decoding Synthetic Phonics.Andrew Davis - 2013 - Impact 2013 (20):1-38.
    In England, current government policy on children's reading is strongly prescriptive, insisting on the delivery of a pure and exclusive form of synthetic phonics, where letter sounds are learned and blended in order to ‘read’ text. A universally imposed phonics ‘check’ is taken by all five year olds and the results are widely reported. These policies are underpinned by the claim that research has shown systematic synthetic phonics to be the most effective way of teaching children to read. Andrew Davis (...)
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  5.  23
    Learning and the social nature of mental powers.Andrew Davis - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):635–647.
    Over the last two decades the traditional conception of intelligence and other mental powers as stable individual assets has been challenged by approaches in psychology emphasising context and ‘situated cognition’. This paper argues that the debate should not be seen as an empirical dispute, and relates it to discussions in philosophy of mind between methodological solipsists and varieties of externalists. In the light of this I argue that attempts to conceptualise the identity over time of mental powers qua individual assets (...)
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  6.  16
    Ability and learning.Andrew Davis - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (1):45–57.
    Andrew Davis; Ability and Learning, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 45–55, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.1988.t.
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  7. Ian Hacking, learner categories and human taxonomies.Andrew Davis - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):441-455.
    I use Ian Hacking 's views to explore ways of classifying people, exploiting his distinction between indifferent kinds and interactive kinds, and his accounts of how we 'make up' people. The natural kind/essentialist approach to indifferent kinds is explored in some depth. I relate this to debates in psychiatry about the existence of mental illness, and to educational controversies about the credentials of learner classifications such as 'dyslexic'. Claims about the 'existence' of learning disabilities cannot be given a clear, simple (...)
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  8.  12
    Logical defects of the TGAT report.Andrew Davis - 1990 - British Journal of Educational Studies 38 (3):237-250.
  9.  5
    Prescribing Teaching Methods.Andrew Davis - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (3):387-401.
    Teachers are no longer simply being told what to teach, but also how to teach it. It is important therefore to examine whether some prescriptions of teaching methods are acceptable while others are not, and to justify opposition to certain forms of prescription. I show that some attempts to prescribe teaching methods are either empty, or incompatible with holding teachers to account for the pupil learning which is supposed to result. My argument does not depend on making any value assumptions (...)
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  10.  20
    How far can we aspire to consistency when assessing learning?Andrew Davis - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (3):217-228.
    How far can consistent assessment capture all the worthwhile features of educational achievement? Are some important components of learning necessarily open to a range of potentially inconsistent judgments by different assessors? I argue for a cautiously affirmative answer to this question, drawing on analogies with aesthetic judgments and a rehearsal of the holistic characteristics of some assessment criteria. I also employ recent treatments of moral particularism and of concepts of incommensurability to oppose the drive for consistency in assessment required by (...)
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  11.  21
    New Philosophies of Learning.Ruth Cigman & Andrew Davis (eds.) - 2009 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a collection of contributions from an international team of empirical researchers and philosophers, _New Philosophies of Learning_ signals the need for a sharper critical awareness of the possibilities and problems that the recent spate of innovative learning techniques presents. Explores some of the many contemporary innovations in approaches to learning, including neuroscience and the focus on learners’ well-being and happiness Debates the controversial approaches to categorising learners such as dyslexia Raises doubts about the preoccupation with quasi-mathematical scrutiny and the (...)
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  12.  15
    Is it really possible to test all educationally significant achievements with high levels of reliability?Andrew Davis - 2015 - Ethics and Education 10 (3):372-379.
    PISA claims that it can extend its reach from its current core subjects of Reading, Science, Maths and problem-solving. Yet given the requirement for high levels of reliability for PISA, especially in the light of its current high stakes character, proposed widening of its subject coverage cannot embrace some important aspects of the social and aesthetic world. Verdicts on the latter often have holistic features, and there are dangers that such verdicts involve attempts to compare what cannot be compared. Judgments (...)
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  13.  95
    Social externalism and the ontology of competence.Andrew Davis - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (3):297-308.
    Social externalism implies that many competences are not personal assets separable from social and cultural environments but complex states of affairs involving individuals and persisting features of social reality. The paper explores the consequences for competence identity over time and across contexts, and hence for the predictive role usually accorded to competences.
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  14.  16
    Neuroscience and Education: At Best a Civil Partnership: A Response to Schrag.Andrew Davis - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (1):31-36.
    In this response, I agree with much of what Schrag says about the principled limits of neuroscience to inform educators' decisions about approaches to learning. However, I also raise questions about the extent to which discoveries about ‘deficits’ in brain function could possibly help teachers. I dispute Schrag's view that externalism/internalism debates in the philosophy of mind are relatively arcane and lack implications for the importance or otherwise for education of discoveries about the brain.
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  15.  7
    Learning and the Social Nature of Mental Powers.Andrew Davis - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (5):635-647.
    Over the last two decades the traditional conception of intelligence and other mental powers as stable individual assets has been challenged by approaches in psychology emphasising context and ‘situated cognition’. This paper argues that the debate should not be seen as an empirical dispute, and relates it to discussions in philosophy of mind between methodological solipsists and varieties of externalists. In the light of this I argue that attempts to conceptualise the identity over time of mental powers qua individual assets (...)
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  16.  36
    Do Children Have Privacy Rights in the Classroom?Andrew Davis - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):245-254.
    Arguing that everyone has a right to privacy as control overaccess to `intimate' aspects of one's life, this author draws on thework of Julie Inness to discuss children's rights to privacy inclassrooms. Even if it is agreed that pupils should exercise this right,a central point is that there may be moral or other value considerationsthat justify setting the right aside. Among selected complexities, animportant extension is the right to psychological processes throughwhich learners acquire new knowledge.
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  17.  11
    Epistemology and Curriculum.Andrew Davis & Kevin Williams - 2003 - In Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 253–270.
    This chapter contains sections titled: I II.
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  18.  12
    Knowing and learning: from Hirst to Ofsted.Andrew John Davis - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (1):214-226.
    Hirst always highlighted knowledge when reflecting on the school curriculum. He replaced his early focus on liberal education, the development of mind and theoretical knowledge by emphasizing the practical and practices as a curriculum starting point and for the framing of educational aims. In this paper I explore links between Hirst’s philosophical treatment of knowledge and some currently contested aspects of UK government education policies. I also note some ways in which his work relates to selected present-day debates in philosophy (...)
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  19.  40
    Examples as method? My attempts to understand assessment and fairness (in the spirit of the later wittgenstein).Andrew Davis - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):371-389.
    What is 'fairness' in the context of educational assessment? I apply this question to a number of contemporary educational assessment practices and policies. My approach to philosophy of education owes much to Wittgenstein. A commentary set apart from the main body of the paper focuses on my style of philosophising. Wittgenstein teaches us to examine in depth the fine-grained complexities of social phenomena and to refrain from imposing abstract theory on a recalcitrant reality. I write philosophy of education for policy (...)
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  20.  8
    The Credentials of Brain-Based Learning.Andrew Davis - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):21-36.
    This paper discusses the current fashion for brain-based learning, in which value-laden claims about learning are grounded in neurophysiology. It argues that brain science cannot have the ‘authority’ about learning that some seek to give it. It goes on to discuss whether the claim that brain science is relevant to learning involves a category mistake. The heart of the paper tries to show how the contribution of brain science to our grasp of the nature of learning is limited in principle. (...)
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  21.  37
    ‘Lookism’, Common Schools, Respect and Democracy.Andrew Davis - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):811–827.
    The Common School should promote a sense of the distinctive worth of all human beings. How is the respect thus owed to every individual to be properly understood? This familiar question is explored by discussing ‘lookism’, a form of discrimination on the grounds of appearance. The treatment is located within a wider analysis of stereotyping. Ultimately stereotyping overlooks persons as sources of actions with moral significance and as potential owners of moral virtues. The Common School could profitably approach traditionally emotive (...)
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  22.  6
    ‘Lookism’, Common Schools, Respect and Democracy.Andrew Davis - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):811-827.
    The Common School should promote a sense of the distinctive worth of all human beings. How is the respect thus owed to every individual to be properly understood? This familiar question is explored by discussing ‘lookism’, a form of discrimination on the grounds of appearance. The treatment is located within a wider analysis of stereotyping. Ultimately stereotyping overlooks persons as sources of actions with moral significance and as potential owners of moral virtues. The Common School could profitably approach traditionally emotive (...)
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  23.  33
    High stakes testing and the structure of the mind: A reply to Randall Curren.Andrew Davis - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (1):1–16.
    Abstract‘High stakes testing’ is to be understood as testing with serious consequences for students, their teachers and their educational institutions. It plays a central role in holding teachers and educational institutions to account. In a recent article Randall Curren seeks to refute a number of philosophical arguments developed in my The Limits of Educational Assessment against the legitimacy of high stakes testing. In this reply I contend that some of the arguments he identifies are not mine, and that others survive (...)
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  24.  7
    Learning and belief.Andrew Davis - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):7–20.
    Andrew Davis; Learning and Belief, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 20, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 7–20, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.1986.tb0.
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  25.  34
    3. understanding and holism.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):41–55.
    Andrew Davis; 3. Understanding and Holism, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 41–55, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.
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  26.  16
    Matching.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of the Philosophy of Education 32 (1):107-121.
    Andrew Davis; 7. Matching, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 107–121, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.00080.
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  27.  19
    Can there be a moral psychology of democratic and civic education & understanding mathematics.David Carr & Andrew Davis - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 31 (2):355–364.
    David Carr, Andrew Davis; Can there be a Moral Psychology of Democratic and Civic Education & Understanding Mathematics, Journal of Philosophy of Education.
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  28.  6
    Can there be a Moral Psychology of Democratic and Civic Education & Understanding Mathematics.David Carr & Andrew Davis - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 31 (2):355-364.
    David Carr, Andrew Davis; Can there be a Moral Psychology of Democratic and Civic Education & Understanding Mathematics, Journal of Philosophy of Education.
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  29.  23
    2. accountability and the economy.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):19–39.
    Andrew Davis; 2. Accountability and the Economy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 19–39, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467.
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  30.  7
    2. Accountability and the Economy.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):19-39.
    Andrew Davis; 2. Accountability and the Economy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 19–39, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467.
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  31. Assessment and evaluation.Andrew Davis - 2023 - In Winston C. Thompson (ed.), Philosophical Foundations of Education. Bloomsbury Academic.
     
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  32. Assessment and evaluation.Andrew Davis - 2023 - In Winston C. Thompson (ed.), Philosophical foundations of education. Bloomsbury Academic.
     
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  33.  29
    Accountability and School Inspection: In Defence of Audited Self‐Review.Andrew Davis & John White - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):667–681.
    Accountability involves not only schools answering to society, but parents and governments doing the same. In particular, governments should answer for the appropriateness of the educational aims they seek to promote. Making schools accountable to society through examination results is fundamentally flawed. Teachers must be able to account for how the specifics of their job relate to wider educational and social aims. The best approach to holding schools to account through external inspection is that of ‘audited self review’. The notion (...)
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  34.  15
    Accountability and School Inspection: In Defence of Audited Self-Review.Andrew Davis & John White - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):667-681.
    Accountability involves not only schools answering to society, but parents and governments doing the same. In particular, governments should answer for the appropriateness of the educational aims they seek to promote. Making schools accountable to society through examination results is fundamentally flawed. Teachers must be able to account for how the specifics of their job relate to wider educational and social aims. The best approach to holding schools to account through external inspection is that of ‘audited self review’. The notion (...)
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  35. Astrophilosophy, exotheology, and cosmic religion: extraterrestrial life in a process universe.Andrew M. Davis & Roland Faber (eds.) - 2024 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This book examines the process philosophies of Whitehead and others against current discussions of astrobiology, extraterrestrial life, and their engagement by theological and religious systems.
     
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  36.  2
    A Monstrous Regimen of Synthetic Phonics: Fantasies of Research‐Based Teaching ‘Methods’ versus Real Teaching.Andrew Davis - 2013 - In Richard Smith (ed.), Education Policy. Oxford, UK: Wiley. pp. 47–59.
    In England, higher education institutions, together with the schools whose staff they train, are being required to incorporate synthetic phonics as one of the key approaches to the teaching of reading. Yet even if synthetic phonics can be identified as one of the component ‘skills’ of reading, an assumption vigorously contested in this paper, it does not follow that it can or should be taught explicitly and independently of reading for meaning. Imposing such a ‘method’ is, at a deep level, (...)
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  37.  11
    Bibliography.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):153–155.
    Andrew Davis; Bibliography, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 153–155, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.00083.
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  38.  15
    Bibliography.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):153-155.
    Andrew Davis; Bibliography, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 153–155, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9752.00083.
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  39.  2
    4. Belief and Language‐based Assessment.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):57–65.
    Andrew Davis; 4. Belief and Language-based Assessment, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 57–65, https://doi.org/10.111.
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  40.  1
    4. Belief and Language-based Assessment.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):57-65.
    Andrew Davis; 4. Belief and Language-based Assessment, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 57–65, https://doi.org/10.111.
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  41.  20
    Consistency, understanding and truth in educational research.Andrew Davis - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):487–500.
    What do Elliot Eisner's discussions of objectivity mean for the strength of the link between consistency and truth in educational research? Following his lead, I pursue this question by comparing aspects of qualitative educational research with appraising the arts. I argue that some departures from the highest levels of consistency in assessing the arts are compatible with truth and objectivity, and that this is at least suggestive for how consistency in qualitative educational research should be viewed. In the final part (...)
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  42.  68
    Defending religious pluralism for religious education.Andrew Davis - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (3):189 - 202.
    Religious exclusivism, or the idea that only one religion can be true, fuels hatred and conflict in the modern world. Certain objections to religious pluralism, together with associated defences of exclusivism are flawed. I defend a moderate religious pluralism, according to which the truth of one religion does not automatically imply the falsity of others. The thought that we can respect persons even when holding them mistaken strains credulity when we are dealing with religious convictions. Moreover, exclusivism is informed by (...)
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  43.  1
    Examples as Method? My Attempts to Understand Assessment and Fairness (In the Spirit of the Later Wittgenstein).Andrew Davis - 2010 - In Claudia Ruitenberg (ed.), What do Philosophers of Education do? Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 54–72.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Disability Accommodations Unfairness and the Motivation of Candidates Unfairness in Music Conservatoires Unfairness in 11‐Plus Selection Conclusion Notes References.
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  44. Flawed Objections to Religious Pluralism: The Implications for Religious Education.Andrew Davis - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 66:133-141.
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  45. Hegel's Idealism: The Infinite as Self-Relation.Andrew Davis - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2).
  46.  15
    5. implications for assessment.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):67–74.
    Andrew Davis; 4. Belief and Language-based Assessment, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 57–65, https://doi.org/10.111.
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  47.  13
    5. Implications for Assessment.Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):67-74.
    Andrew Davis; 5. Implications for Assessment, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 67–74, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-97.
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  48. Interpreting Student Responses in High Stakes Standardized Quantitative Learning Assessment.Andrew J. Davis - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 67:186-189.
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  49.  5
    9. is there a future for assessment and accountability?Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):145–152.
    Andrew Davis; 2. Accountability and the Economy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 19–39, https://doi.org/10.1111/1467.
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  50.  17
    9. Is there a Future for Assessment and Accountability?Andrew Davis - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 32 (1):145-152.
    Andrew Davis; 9. Is there a Future for Assessment and Accountability?, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 32, Issue 1, 7 March 2003, Pages 145–152, http.
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