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  1.  92
    Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas S. Rose (eds.) - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate society and the ingenious recasting of power and agency that he saw as both consequence and condition of their operation. These twelve essays provide a critical introduction to Foucault's work on politics, exploring (...)
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  2. Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and the Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas Rose (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    Foucault is often thought to have a great deal to say about the history of madness and sexuality, but little in terms of a general analysis of government and the state.; This volume draws on Foucault's own research to challenge this view, demonstrating the central importance of his work for the study of contemporary politics.; It focuses on liberalism and neo- liberalism, questioning the conceptual opposition of freedom/constraint, state/market and public/private that inform liberal thought.
     
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  3.  1
    Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and the Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas S. Rose (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    Foucault is often thought to have a great deal to say about the history of madness and sexuality, but little in terms of a general analysis of government and the state.; This volume draws on Foucault's own research to challenge this view, demonstrating the central importance of his work for the study of contemporary politics.; It focuses on liberalism and neo- liberalism, questioning the conceptual opposition of freedom/constraint, state/market and public/private that inform liberal thought.
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  4.  4
    Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences.Andrew Barry & Georgina Born (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    The idea that research should become more interdisciplinary has become commonplace. According to influential commentators, the unprecedented complexity of problems such as climate change or the social implications of biomedicine demand interdisciplinary efforts integrating both the social and natural sciences. In this context, the question of whether a given knowledge practice is too disciplinary, or interdisciplinary, or not disciplinary enough has become an issue for governments, research policy makers and funding agencies. Interdisciplinarity, in short, has emerged as a key political (...)
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  5.  14
    Pharmaceutical Matters.Andrew Barry - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (1):51-69.
    Drawing on the work of Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent and Isabelle Stengers on the history of chemistry, this article develops the idea that drug molecules can be understood as ‘informed materials’. This study argues that molecules should not be viewed as discrete objects, but as constituted in their relations to complex informational and material environments. Through a case study of commercial pharmaceutical R&D, the article examines the role of combinatorial and computational chemistry in enriching the informational and material environment of potential drug (...)
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  6.  3
    Technological Zones.Andrew Barry - 2006 - European Journal of Social Theory 9 (2):239-253.
    This article provides an overview of the analysis of technological zones. A technological zone can be understood as a space within which differences between technical practices, procedures and forms have been reduced, or common standards have been established. Such technological zones take broadly one of three forms: metrological zones associated with the development of common forms of measurement; infrastructural zones associated with the creation of common connection standards; and zones of qualification which come into being when objects and practices are (...)
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  7.  4
    8 Multiple Environments.Gisa Weszkalnys & Andrew Barry - 2013 - In Andrew Barry & Georgina Born (eds.), Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences. Routledge. pp. 178.
  8.  35
    Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences.Andrew Barry & Georgina Born - 2013 - In Andrew Barry & Georgina Born (eds.), Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences. Routledge. pp. 1.
  9. Pindices.Andrew Barry & Lucy Kimbell - 2005 - In Bruno Latour & Peter Weibel (eds.), Making Things Public. MIT Press. pp. 872--873.
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  10.  9
    To Public Experiment.Georgina Born & Andrew Barry - 2013 - In Andrew Barry & Georgina Born (eds.), Interdisciplinarity: Reconfigurations of the Social and Natural Sciences. Routledge. pp. 247.
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  11.  1
    What Is an Environmental Problem?Andrew Barry - 2021 - Theory, Culture and Society 38 (2):93-117.
    This paper advances two arguments about environmental problems. First, it interrogates the strength and limitations of empiricist accounts of problems and issues offered by actor-network theory. Drawing on the work of C.S. Peirce, it considers how emerging environmental problems often lead to abductive inferences about the existence of hidden causes that may or may not have caused the problem to emerge. The analysis of environmental problems should be empiricist in so far as it is sceptical of the claims of those (...)
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