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  1.  42
    Quietism and Karma Non-Action as Non-Ethics in Jain Asceticism.Andrea R. Jain & Jeffrey J. Kripal - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (2):197-207.
    This essay is conceived as a contribution to the academic debate on the ethical status of mystical traditions with regard to Jain asceticism in particular and—through comparison of Jain with Advaita Vedanta asceticism—to ideologies of radical quietism more generally. For both Jain and Advaita Vedantic ascetic traditions, the material world, and particularly the body, are the primary obstacles to spiritual development. We deal with the social, physical, and environmental implications of such a worldview, rather than with the practice or the (...)
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  2.  34
    Introduction: “The Need for Repose”.Jeffrey M. Perl, Mita Choudhury, Lesley Chamberlain, Andrea R. Jain & Jeffrey J. Kripal - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (2):157-163.
    This essay introduces the second installment of a symposium in Common Knowledge called “Apology for Quietism.” This introductory piece concerns the sociology of quietism and why, given the supposed quietude of quietists, there is such a thing at all. Dealing first with the “activist” Susan Sontag's attraction to the “quietist” Simone Weil, it then concentrates on the “activist” William Empson's attraction to the Buddha and to Buddhist quietism, with special reference to Empson's lost manuscript Asymmetry in Buddha Faces (and to (...)
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    Apology for Quietism: A Sotto Voce Symposium Part 2.Jeffrey M. Perl, Mita Choudhury, Lesley Chamberlain, Andrea R. Jain & Jeffrey J. Kripal - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (2):157-163.
    This essay introduces the second installment of a symposium in Common Knowledge called “Apology for Quietism.” This introductory piece concerns the sociology of quietism and why, given the supposed quietude of quietists, there is such a thing at all. Dealing first with the “activist” Susan Sontag's attraction to the “quietist” Simone Weil, it then concentrates on the “activist” William Empson's attraction to the Buddha and to Buddhist quietism, with special reference to Empson's lost manuscript Asymmetry in Buddha Faces. The author, (...)
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