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Amber D. Carpenter [17]Amber Carpenter [7]Amber Danielle Carpenter [1]
  1.  92
    Persons Keeping Their Karma Together.Amber D. Carpenter - 2015 - In Koji Tanaka, Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (eds.), The Moon Points Back. Oxford University Press USA.
    This chapter aims to reconstruct the philosophical motivation for the pudgalavāda or “Personalist” Buddhist view that the person is ultimately real. It argues that the ultraminimalism of the Abhidharma is too minimal to account for crucial features of personhood—especially its capacity to construct unities out of pluralities. The Buddhist Personalist insists that the individuation of person-constituting continua must be an ultimately real fact, not something we project onto or construct out of ultimate reality. That certain ultimate particulars really do belong (...)
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  2.  43
    Indian Buddhist Philosophy.Amber Carpenter - 2013 - Acumen Publishing.
    Organised in broadly chronological terms, this book presents the philosophical arguments of the great Indian Buddhist philosophers of the fifth century BCE to the eighth century CE. Each chapter examines their core ethical, metaphysical and epistemological views as well as the distinctive area of Buddhist ethics that we call today moral psychology. Throughout, the book follows three key themes that both tie the tradition together and are the focus for most critical dialogue: the idea of an?tman or no-self, the appearance/reality (...)
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  3. Indian Buddhist Philosophy: Metaphysics as Ethics.Amber Carpenter - 2014 - Routledge.
    Development of Buddhist thought in India; 1. The Buddha’s suffering; 2. Practice and theory of no-self; 3. Kleśas and compassion; 4. The second Buddha’s greater vehicle; 5. Karmic questions; 6. Irresponsible selves, responsible non-selves; 7. The third turning: Yogācāra; 8. The long sixth to seventh century: epistemology as ethics; I. Perception and conception: the changing face ofultimate reality; II. Evaluating reasons: Naiyāyikas and Diṅnāga. III. Madhyamaka response to Yogācāra IV. Percepts and concepts: Apoha 1 ; V. Efficacy: Apoha 2 ; (...)
     
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  4.  54
    I—Ethics of Substance.Amber D. Carpenter - 2014 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):145-167.
    Aristotle bequeathed to us a powerful metaphysical picture, of substances in which properties inhere. The picture has turned out to be highly problematic in many ways; but it is nevertheless a picture not easy to dislodge. Less obvious are the normative tones implicit in the picture and the way these permeate our system of values, especially when thinking of ourselves and our ambitions, hopes and fears. These have proved, if anything, even harder to dislodge than the metaphysical picture which supports (...)
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  5. Pleasure as Genesis in Plato’s Philebus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):73-94.
    Socrates’ claim that pleasure is a γένεσις unifies the Philebus’ conception of pleasure. Close examination of the passage reveals an emphasis on metaphysical-normative dependency in γένεσις. Seeds for such an emphasis were sown in the dialogue’s earlier discussion of μεικτά, thus linking the γένεσις claim to Philebus’ description of pleasure as ἄπειρον. False pleasures illustrate the radical dependency of pleasure on outside determinants. I end tying together the Philebus’ three descriptions of pleasure: restoration, indefinite, and γένεσις.
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  6.  37
    Ranking Knowledge in the Philebus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (2):180-205.
  7.  83
    Embodied Intelligent Souls: Plants in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.
    In the Timaeus , plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. Also in the Timaeus , perception requires the involvement of to phronimon . It seems it must follow that plants are intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that ` to phronimon ' is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are to be (...)
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  8.  30
    Embodying Intelligence: Animals and Us in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber Carpenter - 2008 - In Jure Zovko & John Dillon (eds.), Platonism and Forms of Intelligence. Akademie Verlag. pp. 39-58.
  9.  51
    Embodied Intelligent Souls: Plants in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.
    In the Timaeus, plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. Also in the Timaeus, perception requires the involvement of to phronimon. It seems it must follow that plants are intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that `to phronimon' is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are to be both orderly and good. Plants (...)
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  10. Can You Seek the Answer to This Question? (Meno in India).Amber Carpenter & Jonardon Ganeri - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):571-594.
    Plato articulates a deep perplexity about inquiry in ?Meno's Paradox??the claim that one can inquire neither into what one knows, nor into what one does not know. Although some commentators have wrestled with the paradox itself, many suppose that the paradox of inquiry is special to Plato, arising from peculiarities of the Socratic elenchus or of Platonic epistemology. But there is nothing peculiarly Platonic in this puzzle. For it arises, too, in classical Indian philosophical discussions, where it is formulated with (...)
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  11. Faith Without God in Nagarjuna.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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  12.  2
    Embodied Intelligent Souls: Plants in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2021 - In Fabrizio Baldassarri & Andreas Blank (eds.), Vegetative Powers: The Roots of Life in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Natural Philosophy. Springer. pp. 35-53.
    In the Timaeus, plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. But perception, according to the Timaeus, requires the involvement of to phronimon. It seems to follow that plants must be intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that the phronimon is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are to be both orderly and good (...)
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  13. Metaphysical Suffering, Metaphysics as Therapy.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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  14.  33
    Attention as a Means of Self‐Dissolution and Reformation.Amber D. Carpenter - 2018 - Ratio 31 (4):376-388.
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  15. Brill Online Books and Journals.Amber D. Carpenter - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (4).
  16.  8
    Portraits of Integrity: 26 Case Studies From History, Literature and Philosophy.Amber Carpenter & Rachael Wiseman (eds.) - 2020 - Bloomsbury Publishing.
    Portraits of Integrity depicts more than 20 historical, fictional and contemporary figures whose character or life raises questions about what integrity is and how it is perceived. Integrity might be culturally bound, but this diverse set of portraits demonstrates that it is not the special preserve of any one culture. Portraits of Socrates, Mencius, Rama and Job, alongside the aspirational 16th-century couple John and Dorothy Kaye, civil rights activist Ella Baker and an anonymous banker, highlight the persisting – sometimes conflicting (...)
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  17. Questioning Krishna's Kantianism.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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  18.  70
    Hedonistic Persons. The Good Man Argument in Plato's Philebus.Amber Danielle Carpenter - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):5 – 26.
  19.  10
    Nevertheless: The Philosophical Significance of the Questions Posed at Philebus 15b.Amber Carpenter - 2009 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 12 (1):103-129.
  20.  24
    Nicomachean Ethics 7 (C.) Natali (Ed.) Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Book VII. Pp. Viii + 296. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Cased, £55, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-19-955844-5. [REVIEW]Amber D. Carpenter - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (2):410-413.
  21. What is Peculiar in Aristotle's and Plato's Psychologies? What is Common to Them Both?Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
  22. Judging Strives to Be Knowing.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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  23. Eating One's Own : Exploring Conceptual Space for Moral Restraint.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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  24.  49
    Phileban Gods.Amber Carpenter - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):93-112.
    In the Philebus, Plato reinterprets the traditional Olympian pantheon in terms of a nationalistic account of the cosmos which grounds the alternative to hedonism which Socrates defends. From the metaphysics of the Philebus, we can grasp 'Zeus' as a formal characteristic of the cosmos, required by any teleological account, and internal to the intelligible order of the universe, rather than standing outside of it. The universe is at once rationally ordered and good in virtue of the relation of reason to (...)
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  25. On Plato's Lack of Consciousness.Amber D. Carpenter - unknown
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