15 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Amanda Rees [19]Amanda Jayne Rees [1]
  1.  15
    Introduction.Amanda Rees - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Science 49 (3):383-386.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  13
    Introduction.Amanda Rees & Gregory Radick - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):269-272.
  3.  33
    A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):311-333.
    The ideals and realities of field research have shaped the development of behavioural primatology over the latter half of the twentieth century. This paper draws on interviews with primatologists as well as a survey of the scientific literature to examine the idealized notion of the field site as a natural place and the physical environment of the field as a research space. It shows that what became standard field practice emerged in the course of wide ranging debate about the techniques, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  11
    A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):311-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. Anthropomorphism, Anthropocentrism, and Anecdote: Primatologists on Primatology.Amanda Rees - 2001 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 26 (2):227-247.
    This article critically examines the ways in which primatologists account for their research. Based on a series of unstructured interviews, it argues that the location of primates at the boundary between Western conceptions of nature and culture or human and animal has materially affected how primatologists talk about their research, what they find possible to write about in their research, and where they choose to publish their research. Through the discussion of a number of related topics, it outlines the reflexive (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  8
    The Undead Darwin: Iconic Narrative, Scientific Controversy and the History of Science.Amanda Rees - 2009 - History of Science 47 (4):445-458.
  7. Fielding the Question-Primatological Research in Historical Perspective: Introduction.Amanda Jayne Rees & G. Radick - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Higamous, Hogamous, Woman Monogamous.Amanda Rees - 2000 - Feminist Theory 1 (3):365-370.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  9
    Doing ‘Deep Big History’: Race, Landscape and the Humanity of H J Fleure.Amanda Rees - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (1):99-120.
    This article argues that current programmes in the human sciences which adopt a multi-disciplinary approach to history need to be wary of treating the knowledge of the natural sciences as being independent of social influence. Such efforts to do ‘Big History’, ‘Deep History’ or co-evolutionary history themselves have a past, and this article suggests that potential practitioners could benefit from considering that historical context. To that end, it explores the career of Herbert John Fleure, a scholar whose career defied disciplinary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  11
    Donna Haraway, the Haraway Reader. New York and London: Routledge, 2004. Pp. VIII+352. Isbn 0-415-96688-4. £16.99.Amanda Rees - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):117-118.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    Editorial, December 2019.Amanda Rees - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Science:1-1.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    Gavin Schaffer, Racial Science and British Society, 1930–62. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. Pp. X+234. ISBN 978-0-230-00892-2. £45.00. [REVIEW]Amanda Rees - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (3):501-502.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  4
    Donald A. Dewsbury. Monkey Farm: A History of the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology, Orange Park, Florida, 1930–1965. 347 Pp., Figs., Indexes. Lewisberg, Pa.: Bucknell University Press, 2006. [REVIEW]Amanda Rees - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):209-210.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  4
    Jeremy Rich. Missing Links: The African and American Worlds of R. L. Garner, Primate Collector. Xi + 220 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Athens/London: University of Georgia Press, 2012. $24. [REVIEW]Amanda Rees - 2013 - Isis 104 (1):180-180.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  6
    Ecology, Biology and Social Life: Explaining the Origins of Primate Sociality.Amanda Rees - 2006 - History of Science 44 (4):409-434.