9 found
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  1. Patient Autonomy and the Family Veto Problem in Organ Procurement.Alexander Zambrano - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (1):180-200.
    A number of bioethicists have been critical of the power of the family to “veto” a patient’s decision to posthumously donate her organs within opt-in systems of organ procurement. One major objection directed at the family veto is that when families veto the decision of their deceased family member, they do something wrong by violating or failing to respect the autonomy of that deceased family member. The goal of this paper is to make progress on answering this objection. I do (...)
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  2.  31
    Fewer Mistakes and Presumed Consent.Alexander Zambrano - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (1):58-79.
    “Opt-out” organ procurement policies based on presumed consent are typically advertised as being superior to “opt-in” policies based on explicit consent at securing organs for transplantation. However, Michael Gill has argued that presumed consent policies are also better than opt-in policies at respecting patient autonomy. According to Gill’s Fewer Mistakes Argument, we ought to implement the procurement policy that results in the fewest frustrated wishes regarding organ donation. Given that the majority of Americans wish to donate their organs, it is (...)
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  3.  48
    Why Alcoholics Ought to Compete Equally for Liver Transplants.Alexander Zambrano - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9):689-697.
    Some philosophers and physicians have argued that alcoholic patients, who are responsible for their liver failure by virtue of alcoholism, ought to be given lower priority for a transplant when donated livers are being allocated to patients in need of a liver transplant. The primary argument for this proposal, known as the Responsibility Argument, is based on the more general idea that patients who require scarce medical resources should be given lower priority for those resources when they are responsible for (...)
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  4.  30
    Covert moral bioenhancement, public health, and autonomy.Alexander Zambrano - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):725-728.
    In a recent article in this journal, Parker Crutchfield argues that if moral bioenhancement ought to be compulsory, as some authors claim, then it ought to be covert, i.e., performed without the knowledge of the population that is being morally enhanced. Crutchfield argues that since the aim of compulsory moral bioenhancement is to prevent ultimate harm to the population, compulsory moral bioenhancement is best categorized as a public health issue, and should therefore be governed by the norms and values that (...)
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  5.  57
    A defense of ad blocking and consumer inattention.Alexander Zambrano & Caleb Pickard - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (3):143-155.
    Ad blockers are a category of computer software program, typically run as web browser extensions, that allow users to selectively eliminate advertisements from the webpages they visit. Many people have alleged that using an ad blocker is morally problematic because it is bad for content providers and consumers, and it is morally akin to theft. We disagree. In this paper, we defend an independent argument for the conclusion that using an ad blocker is morally permissible. In doing so, we respond (...)
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  6.  47
    Animal Experimentation as a Form of Rescue.Alexander Zambrano - 2016 - Between the Species 19 (1).
    In this paper I explore a new approach to the ethics of animal experimentation by conceiving of it as a form of rescue. The notion of rescue, I suggest, involves some moral agent performing an action or series of actions, whose end is to prevent or alleviate serious harm to another party, harm that otherwise would have occurred or would have continued to occur, had that moral agent not intervened. Animal experiments that are utilized as a means to alleviate human (...)
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    Locked Up and Shut Out: The Suffering of Incarcerated Psychopaths.Alexander Zambrano - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (3):152-154.
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    Organ Conscription and Greater Needs.Alexander Zambrano - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):123-133.
    Since its inception, the institution of postmortem organ transplantation has faced the problem of organ shortage: Every year, the demand for donor organs vastly exceeds supply, resulting in the deaths of approximately 8,000 individuals in the United States alone.1 This is in large part due to the fact that the United States, for the most part, operates under an “opt-in” policy in which people are given the opportunity to voluntarily opt-in to organ donation by registering as organ donors.2 In the (...)
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  9.  33
    Should consent be required for organ procurement?Alexander Zambrano - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):421-429.
    Must we obtain a patient’s consent before posthumously removing her organs? According to the consent requirement, in order to permissibly remove organs from a deceased person, it is necessary that her prior consent be obtained. If the consent requirement is true, then this seems to rule out policies that do not seek and obtain a patient’s prior consent to organ donation, while at the same time vindicating policies that do seek and obtain patient consent. In this paper, however, I argue (...)
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