6 found
Order:
  1.  1
    Personification and the Feminine in Roman Philosophy.Alex Dressler - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    While the central ideal of Roman philosophy exemplified by Lucretius, Cicero and Seneca appears to be the masculine values of self-sufficiency and domination, this book argues, through close attention to metaphor and figures, that the Romans also recognized, as constitutive parts of human experience, what for them were feminine concepts such as embodiment, vulnerability and dependency. Expressed especially in the personification of grammatically feminine nouns such as Nature and Philosophy 'herself', the Roman's recognition of this private 'feminine' part of himself (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. SENECA'S AGAMEMNON_- (A.J.) Boyle Seneca: _Agamemnon. Edited with Introduction, Translation and Commentary. Pp. Cxlvi + 600. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Cased, £120, US$155. ISBN: 978-0-19-881082-7. [REVIEW]Alex Dressler - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (2):414-416.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  7
    Politics and Philosophy at Rome: Collected Papers, Edited by Miriam T. Griffin and Catalina Balmaceda.Alex Dressler - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):181-184.
  4.  22
    Political Imagery - Brock Greek Political Imagery. From Homer to Aristotle. Pp. XX + 252. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. Cased, £70, Us$130. Isbn: 978-1-78093-206-4. [REVIEW]Alex Dressler - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (2):345-347.
  5.  8
    Roman Error: Classical Reception and the Problem of Rome's Flaws Ed. By Basil Dufallo.Alex Dressler - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (4):367-368.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  1
    1. Cover Cover (Pp. C1-C4) Free Content.Alex Dressler, Miguel Herrero De Jäuregui, Deborah Kamen, Leslie Kurke, Michael Mordine & Craig A. Williams - 2013 - Classical Antiquity 32 (1):78-100.
    This article argues we can better interpret key aspects of Plato's Phaedo, including Socrates' cryptic final words, if we read the dialogue against the background of Greek manumission. I first discuss modes of manumission in ancient Greece, showing that the frequent participation of healing gods reveals a conception of manumission as “healing.” I next examine Plato's use of manumission and slavery as metaphors, arguing that Plato uses the language of slavery in two main ways: like real slavery, metaphorical slavery could (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark