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Albert W. Dzur [17]Albert William Dzur [1]
  1.  18
    Democratic Professionalism: Citizen Participation and the Reconstruction of Professional Ethics, Identity, and Practice.Albert W. Dzur - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Albert Dzur proposes an approach he calls "democratic professionalism" to build bridges between specialists in domains like law, medicine, and journalism and the lay public in such a way as to enable and enhance broader public engagement ...
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  2.  20
    Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury.Albert W. Dzur - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Focusing democratic theory on the pressing issue of punishment, Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury argues for participatory institutional designs as antidotes to the American penal state. Citizen action in institutions like the jury and restorative justice programs can foster the attunement, reflectiveness, and full-bodied communication needed as foundations for widespread civic responsibility for criminal justice.
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  3.  1
    Democratic Professionalism: Citizen Participation and the Reconstruction of Professional Ethics, Identity, and Practice.Albert W. Dzur - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Bringing expert knowledge to bear in an open and deliberative way to help solve pressing social problems is a major concern today, when technocratic and bureaucratic decision making often occurs with little or no input from the general public. Albert Dzur proposes an approach he calls “democratic professionalism” to build bridges between specialists in domains like law, medicine, and journalism and the lay public in such a way as to enable and enhance broader public engagement with and deliberation about major (...)
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  4.  32
    Value Pluralism Versus Political Liberalism?Albert W. Dzur - 1998 - Social Theory and Practice 24 (3):375-392.
  5.  49
    Participatory Democracy and Criminal Justice.Albert W. Dzur - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):115-129.
    This essay asks if there is a role for an active public in ratcheting down the harsh politics of crime control in the United States and the United Kingdom that has led to increased use of the criminal law and greater severity in punishment. It considers two opposing answers offered by political and legal theorists and then begins to develop a participatory democratic framework for institutional reform.
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  6.  41
    Forgiveness and Public Deliberation: The Practice of Restorative Justice.Albert W. Dzur & Alan Wertheimer - 2002 - Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (1):3-20.
  7.  23
    The "Nation's Conscience:" Assessing Bioethics Commissions as Public Forums.Albert W. Dzur & Daniel Lessard Levin - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (4):333-360.
    : As the fifth national bioethics commission has concluded its work and a sixth is currently underway, it is time to step back and consider appropriate measures of success. This paper argues that standard measures of commissions' influence fail to fully assess their role as public forums. From the perspective of democratic theory, a critical dimension of this role is public engagement: the ability of a commission to address the concerns of the general public, to learn how average citizens resolve (...)
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  8.  25
    Democracy’s “Free School”: Tocqueville and Lieber on the Value of the Jury.Albert W. Dzur - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (5):603-630.
    This essay discusses the jury 's value in American democracy by examining Alexis de Tocqueville 's analysis of the jury as a free school for the public. His account of jury socialization, which stressed lay deference to judges and trust in professional knowledge, was one side of a complex set of ideas about trust and authority in American political thought. Tocqueville 's contemporary Francis Lieber held juries to have important competencies and to be ambivalent rather than deferential regarding court professionals. (...)
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  9. The Primacy of the Public: In Support of Bioethics Commissions as Deliberative Forums.Albert W. Dzur & Daniel Lessard Levin - 2007 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):133-142.
    : In a 2004 article, we argued that bioethics commissions should be assessed in terms of their usefulness as public forums. A 2006 article by Summer Johnson argued that our perspective was not supported by the existing literature on presidential commissions, which had not previously identified commissions as public forums and that we did not properly account for the political functions of commissions as instruments of presidential power. Johnson also argued that there was nothing sufficiently unique about bioethics commissions to (...)
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  10.  37
    Four Theses on Participatory Democracy: Toward the Rational Disorganization of Government Institutions.Albert W. Dzur - 2012 - Constellations 19 (2):305-324.
  11.  50
    “Why American Democracy Needs the Jury Trial”: Robert P. Burns: The Death of the American Trial. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.Albert W. Dzur - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):87-92.
  12.  36
    The Myth of Penal Populism: Democracy, Citizen Participation, and American Hyperincarceration.Albert W. Dzur - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4):354-379.
    But the action of the common people is always either too remiss or too violent. Sometimes with a hundred thousand arms they overturn all before them; and sometimes with a hundred thousand feet they creep like insects.Late modernity, when things and people are so fluid and fast until they stop, is a time of unsettled democratic identities. A well-known image of Magritte's, entitled La folie des grandeurs, or Megalomania, depicts a female torso in three stacked hollow segments of inclining scale, (...)
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  13. 1. Front Matter Front Matter.Zach VanderVeen, Elinor Ostrom, David Ellerman, Albert W. Dzur, Bruce R. Sievers & Stephen Bloch-Schulman - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4).
     
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  14.  19
    The Priority of Participation: A Friendly Response to Professor Gargarella.Albert W. Dzur - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (3):473-477.
    A response to Roberto Gargarella’s review of Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury, by Albert W. Dzur.
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  15.  10
    The Myth of Penal Populism.Albert W. Dzur - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4):354.
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  16.  13
    Function, Convention, and Policy: William Galston and the Redefinition of Liberal Purposes.Albert W. Dzur - 1998 - Public Affairs Quarterly 12 (1):101-117.
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  17.  25
    The Value of Community Participation in Restorative Justice.Albert W. Dzur & Susan M. Olson - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):91–107.