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Alan Muller [6]Alan R. Muller [1]
  1.  33
    Exploring the Geography of Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: A Study of Fortune Global 500 Firms.Alan Muller & Gail Whiteman - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):589-603.
    In recent years, major disasters have figured prominently in the media. While corporate response to disasters may have raised corporate philanthropy to a new level, it remains an understudied phenomenon. This article draws on comparative research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate philanthropy to explore the geography of corporate philanthropic disaster response. The study analyzes donation announcements made by Fortune Global 500 firms from North America, Europe and Asia to look for regional patterns across three recent disasters: the South (...)
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  2.  61
    The Value of Corporate Philanthropy During Times of Crisis: The Sensegiving Effect of Employee Involvement. [REVIEW]Alan Muller & Roman Kräussl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):203-220.
    Recent research suggests that philanthropy’s value to the firm is largely mediated by contextual factors such as managers’ assumed motives for charity. Our article extends this contingency perspective using a “sensegiving” lens, by which external actors’ interpretations of organizational actions may be influenced by the way in which the organization communicates about those actions. We consider how sensegiving features in philanthropy-related press releases affect whether investors value those donation decisions. For the empirical investigation in this study, we analyze abnormal returns (...)
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  3.  21
    Corporate Philanthropic Responses to Emergent Human Needs: The Role of Organizational Attention Focus.Alan Muller & Gail Whiteman - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):299-314.
    Research on corporate philanthropy typically focuses on organization-external pressures and aggregated donation behavior. Hence, our understanding of the organization-internal structures that determine whether a given organization will respond philanthropically to a specific human need remains underdeveloped. We explicate an attention-based framework in which specific dimensions of organization-level attention focus interact to predict philanthropic responses to an emergent human need. Exploring the response of Fortune Global 500 firms to the 2004 South Asian tsunami, we find that management attention focused on people (...)
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  4.  29
    CSR Performance in Emerging Markets Evidence From Mexico.Alan Muller & Ans Kolk - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):325 - 337.
    Although interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in emerging markets has increased in recent years, most research still focuses on developed countries. The scant literature on the topic, which traditionally suggested that CSR was relatively underdeveloped in emerging markets, has recently explored the context specificity, suggesting that it is different and reflects the specific social and political background. This would particularly apply to local companies, not so much to foreign subsidiaries of multinationals active in emerging markets. Thus far, empirical research (...)
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  5.  23
    An Integrative Conceptualization of Organizational Compassion and Organizational Justice: A Sensemaking Perspective.Khuram Shahzad & Alan R. Muller - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (2):144-158.
    Organizational scholars tend to view justice and compassion as incompatible. While both have important functions in organizational life, compassion's affective elements appear difficult to synthesize with the reasoning and impartiality that underlie the concept of justice. We draw on theoretical arguments from the sensemaking perspective to argue that we can integrate organizational compassion and organizational justice conceptually because both are inherently dynamic processes that rely on emotional and cognitive components, and both are shaped by the social context of the organization. (...)
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  6.  4
    When Does Corporate Social Performance Pay for International Firms?Alan Muller - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (8):1554-1588.
    How does corporate social performance affect financial performance as the firm expands internationally? To address this question, I integrate arguments from the International Business literature and the literature on CSP to propose that the costs and benefits associated with CSP are unevenly distributed across the range of internationalization. Specifically, I argue that the costs of CSP outweigh the benefits at low levels of internationalization, while the benefits outweigh the costs at high levels of internationalization, leading to a moderated, U-shaped relationship. (...)
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  7.  28
    Responsible Tax as Corporate Social Responsibility.Ans Kolk & Alan Muller - 2015 - Business and Society 54 (4):435-463.
    Anecdotal evidence often suggests that multinational enterprises operating in developing countries “exploit their multinationality” to avoid paying taxes to host governments. This article explores the concept of “responsible tax” as a corporate social responsibility issue for MNEs, based on the notion that MNEs face considerable variation in the extent, monitoring, and application of tax laws internationally. This variation creates a “moral free space” as to which tax payments to make. Using firm-level data from three important sectors in India, the authors (...)
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