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Alan H. Goldman [129]Alan Goldman [28]Alan Harris Goldman [1]
  1.  35
    Representation and make-believe.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 36 (3):335 – 350.
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  2.  85
    Reasons from within: desires and values.Alan H. Goldman - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Alan H. Goldman argues for the internalist or subjectivist view of practical reasons on the grounds that it is simpler, more unified, and more comprehensible ...
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  3. Aesthetic value.Alan H. Goldman - 1995 - Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press.
    In this concise survey, intended for advanced undergraduate students of aesthetics, Alan Goldman focuses on the question of aesthetic value, using many practical examples from painting, music, and literature to make his case. Although he treats a wide variety of views, he argues for a nonrealist view of aesthetic value, showing that the personal element can never be factored out of evaluative aesthetic judgments and explaining why this is so.
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  4. Plain sex.Alan Goldman - 1977 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 6 (3):267-287.
  5. The moral foundations of professional ethics.Alan H. Goldman (ed.) - 1980 - Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This books examines the fundamental values and principles of conduct in the professions, focusing specifically on four areas: law, politics, medicine and business. One central question unifies its inquiry into the different professions: should the principles for judging the actions of professionals be the same as those used to judge private individuals, or do these professions require special moral principles to guide their conduct. The author considers arguments deriving from the underlying institutional goals of each profession in turn.
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  6.  68
    Life's Values: Pleasure, Happiness, Well-Being, and Meaning.Alan H. Goldman - 2018 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Life's Values offers new analyses of the nature of pleasure, happiness, well-being, and meaning in life. Recognizing how individuals have different priorities, Goldman explains what is of ultimate value in our lives and argues that making our desires rational - relevantly informed of what it's like to satisfy them - maximizes well-being.
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  7.  51
    Empirical Knowledge.Alan H. Goldman - 1988 - University of California Press.
    This remarkably clear and comprehensive account of empirical knowledge will be valuable to all students of epistemology and philosophy. The author begins from an explanationist analysis of knowing—a belief counts as knowledge if, and only if, its truth enters into the best explanation for its being held. Defending common sense and scientific realism within the explanationist framework, Alan Goldman provides a new foundational approach to justification. The view that emerges is broadly empiricist, counteracting the recently dominant trend that rejects that (...)
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  8. The experiential account of aesthetic value.Alan H. Goldman - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):333–342.
  9. The paradox of punishment.Alan H. Goldman - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (1):42-58.
  10. Aesthetic qualities and aesthetic value.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
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  11.  21
    Musical Meaning and Expression.Alan H. Goldman - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (185):533-535.
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  12. The Moral Foundations of Professional Ethics.Alan H. Goldman - 1983 - Law and Philosophy 2 (3):397-403.
     
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  13.  41
    Philosophy and the novel.Alan H. Goldman - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Part I. Philosophy of novels. 1. Introduction: philosophical content and literary value -- 2. Interpreting novels -- 3. The sun also rises: incompatible interpretations -- 4. The appeal of the mystery -- Part II. Philosophy in novels. 5. Moral development in Pride and prejudice -- 6. Huckleberry Finn and moral motivation -- 7. What we learn about rules from The cider house rules -- 8. Nostromo and the fragility of the self.
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  14. Realism about aesthetic properties.Alan H. Goldman - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):31-37.
  15.  81
    Music, Art, and Metaphysics: Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics.Alan H. Goldman - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (4):327-329.
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  16.  31
    Moral knowledge.Alan H. Goldman - 1988 - New York: Routledge.
    Originally published in 1988, this book discusses if moral knowledge exists, and if so, if it is similar to other forms of knowledge. This book approaches the issues from both historical and contemporary perspectives and in order to determine whether there is a real property of rightness, looks to the ethical theories of Hobbes, Hume and Kant. This historical analysis leads to a systematic comparison of three theories of the nature of ethics: realism, emotivism and coherentism. The nature of coherence (...)
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  17. The Broad View of Aesthetic Experience.Alan H. Goldman - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):323-333.
    Peter Kivy and Noël Carroll advocate a narrow view of aesthetic experience according to which it consists mainly in attention to formal properties. Excluded are cognitive and moral properties. I defend the broader view that includes the latter properties. I argue first that cognition and moral assessment can be inseparable in experience from grasp of form and expressiveness. Second, Kivy and Carroll must extend the notion of form itself beyond ordinary usage to accommodate acknowledged aesthetic experience. Third, the broad view (...)
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  18. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.Alan H. Goldman - 1979 - Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):159-162.
     
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  19. Reason Internalism.Alan H. Goldman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):505 - 533.
    This paper defends strong internalism about reasons, the view that reasons must relate to pre-existing motivational states, from several kinds of counterexamples, supposed desire independent reasons, that have been proposed. A central distinction drawn is that between there being a reason and an agent's having a reason. For an agent to have an F reason, she must be F-minded. Reasons, as what motivate us, are states of affairs and not themselves desires or motivational states, but they must connect to existing (...)
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  20. Business ethics: Profits, utilities, and moral rights.Alan H. Goldman - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (3):260-286.
  21. Interpreting art and literature.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (3):205-214.
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  22.  67
    Well-Being and Experience.Alan H. Goldman - 2022 - The Journal of Ethics 26 (2):175-192.
    Robert Nozick argued that we would not plug into his machine that could give us any experiences we chose. More recently Richard Kraut has argued that it would be prudentially rational to plug into the machine, since only experiences count for personal welfare. I argue that both are wrong, that either choice can be rational or not, depending on the central desires of the subjects choosing. This claim is supported by the empirical evidence, which shows an almost even split between (...)
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  23.  78
    Desire Based Reasons and Reasons for Desires.Alan H. Goldman - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):469-488.
  24. Affirmative action.Alan H. Goldman - 1976 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (2):178-195.
  25. Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value.Alan H. Goldman - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
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  26. The entitlement theory of distributive justice.Alan H. Goldman - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (21):823-835.
  27. Huckleberry Finn and moral motivation.Alan Goldman - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 1-16.
    Huckleberry Finn is not irrational in being unmotivated to follow his explicit judgments of rightness and wrongness. Philosophers have previously judged Huck to be irrational, subject to weakness of will, in being unable to act on his moral judgment. But their interpretation rests on incorrect analyses of weak will and of the emotions on which Huck does act. I also argue that such emotion based motivation is not of the kind that could be rationally required. The character of Huckleberry Finn (...)
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  28.  48
    An Explanatory Analysis of Knowledge.Alan H. Goldman - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (1):101 - 108.
  29.  37
    Evaluating art.Alan Goldman - 2004 - In Peter Kivy (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aesthetics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 93--108.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Aesthetic Properties and Principles Ideal Critics Engagement Objections and Questions References Further reading.
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  30. The aesthetic.Alan Goldman - 2000 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
  31.  17
    The Paradox of Punishment.Alan Goldman - 1994 - In A. John Simmons, Marshall Cohen, Joshua Cohen & Charles R. Beitz (eds.), Punishment: A Philosophy and Public Affairs Reader. Princeton University Press. pp. 30-47.
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  32.  83
    What desires are, and are not.Alan H. Goldman - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (2):333-352.
    This paper criticizes the account of desire defended by Nomy Arpaly and Timothy Schroeder in their recent book, In Praise of Desire. It contrasts their account with one that I favor, a cluster analysis listing various criteria that are together sufficient for having paradigm desires, but none of which is necessary or sufficient for desiring. I argue that their account fails to state necessary or sufficient conditions, that it is explanatorily weaker than the cluster account, that it fails to provide (...)
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  33. Toward a new theory of punishment.Alan H. Goldman - 1982 - Law and Philosophy 1 (1):57 - 76.
    Criteria for a successful theory of punishment include first, that it specify a reasonable limit to punishments in particular cases, and second, that it allow benefits to outweigh costs in a penal institution.It is argued that traditional utilitarian and retributive theories fail to satisfy both criteria, and that they cannot be coherently combined so as to do so. Retributivism specifies a reasonable limit in its demand that punishment equal crime, but this limit fails to allow benefits to outweigh costs of (...)
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  34.  31
    The Moral Significance of National Boundaries.Alan H. Goldman - 1982 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):437-453.
  35.  13
    An Explanatory Analysis of Knowledge.Alan H. Goldman - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):718-719.
  36. The Justification of Equal Opportunity.Alan H. Goldman - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (1):88-103.
    As a preliminary to the justification of equal opportunity, we require a few words on the concept. An opportunity is a chance to attain some goal or obtain some benefit. More precisely, it is the lack of some obstacle or obstacles to the attainment of some goal(s) or benefit(s). Opportunities are equal in some specified or understood sense when persons face roughly the same obstacles or obstacles of roughly the same difficulty of some specified or understood sort. In different contexts (...)
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  37.  74
    Knowledge, explanation, and lotteries.Alan Goldman - 2008 - Noûs 42 (3):466-481.
  38.  64
    Emotions in music (a postscript).Alan Goldman - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):59-69.
  39.  15
    Red and Right.Alan H. Goldman - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (7):349.
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  40.  49
    Reparations to Individuals or Groups?Alan H. Goldman - 1975 - Analysis 35 (5):168 - 170.
  41.  31
    Fanciful arguments for realism.Alan H. Goldman - 1984 - Mind 93 (369):19-38.
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  42.  20
    Intransitivity, Essential Comparativeness, and Objective Value.Alan H. Goldman - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (1):14-31.
    Building on Goldman 2008 and 2009, which argue that objective values would be strange in coming in degrees but in no determinate number of degrees, this paper argues that related properties having to do with degrees of value make a further case against objective values. The properties of giving rise to intransitive orderings and being essentially comparative are explained by Larry Temkin in Rethinking the Good. He shows that “better than” is intransitively ordered. Many subjective states are too. But similar (...)
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  43.  9
    Reparations to Individuals or Groups?Alan H. Goldman - 1975 - Analysis 35 (5):168-170.
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  44. The force of precedent in legal, moral, and empirical reasoning.Alan H. Goldman - 1987 - Synthese 71 (3):323 - 346.
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  45. The value of music.Alan Goldman - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (1):35-44.
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  46.  9
    The Moral Foundations of Professional Ethics.David Luban & Alan H. Goldman - 1981 - Hastings Center Report 11 (3):38.
    Book reviewed in this article: The Moral Foundations of Professional Ethics. By Alan H. Goldman.
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  47.  53
    Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don’t.Alan H. Goldman (ed.) - 2001 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman provides a (...)
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  48. The Case Against Objective Values.Alan H. Goldman - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):507-524.
    While objective values need not be intrinsically motivating, need not actually motivate us, they would determine what we ought to pursue and protect. They would provide reasons for actions. Objective values would come in degrees, and more objective value would provide stronger reasons. It follows that, if objective value exists, we ought to maximize it in the world. But virtually no one acts with that goal in mind. Furthermore, objective value would exist independently of our subjective valuings. But we have (...)
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  49.  28
    Justice and Hiring by Competence.Alan H. Goldman - 1977 - American Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):17 - 28.
  50.  87
    Red and right.Alan H. Goldman - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (7):349-362.
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