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Aimee Milliken [11]Aimee B. Milliken [1]
  1.  29
    Nurse ethical sensitivity.Aimee Milliken - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301664615.
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  2.  44
    Nurse ethical awareness: Understanding the nature of everyday practice.Aimee Milliken & Pamela Grace - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (5):517-524.
  3.  23
    Refining moral agency: Insights from moral psychology and moral philosophy.Aimee Milliken - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (1):e12185.
    Research in moral psychology has recently raised questions about the impact of context and the environment on the way the human mind works. In a 2012 call to action, Paley wrote: “If some of the conclusions arrived at by moral psychologists are true, they are directly relevant to the way nurses think about moral problems, and present serious challenges to favoured concepts in nursing ethics, such as the ethics of care, virtue, and the unity of the person” (p. 80). He (...)
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  4.  26
    Ethics Consultations at a Major Academic Medical Center: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Analysis.Aimee Milliken, Andrew Courtwright, Pamela Grace, Elizabeth Eagan-Bengston, Monique Visser & Martha Jurchak - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (4):275-286.
    Growing evidence suggests that nurses and other clinicians often feel insufficiently equipped to manage ethical issues that arise in their practice (Truog et al. 2015; Woods 2005; Darmon et al. 201...
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  5.  17
    When Societal Structural Issues Become Patient Problems: The Role of Clinical Ethics Consultation.Aimee Milliken, Martha Jurchak & Nicholas Sadovnikoff - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (5):7-9.
    The debate about health insurance coverage and the related issue of unequal access to health care turn on fundamental questions of justice, but for an individual patient like DM, the abstract question about who is deserving of health insurance becomes a very concrete problem that has a profound impact on care and livelihood. DM's circumstances left him stuck in the hospital. A satisfactory discharge plan remained elusive; his insurance coverage severely limited the number and type of facilities that would accept (...)
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  6.  20
    Ethical Awareness Scale: Replication Testing, Invariance Analysis, and Implications.Aimee Milliken, Larry Ludlow & Pamela Grace - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (4):231-240.
    Ethical awareness enables nurses to recognize the ethical implications of all practice actions, and is an important component of safe and high quality nursing care (Milliken 2016; Milliken and Grac...
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  7.  7
    A semantic exploration: Nurse ethicist, medical ethicist, or clinical ethicist: Do distinctions matter?Pamela J. Grace & Aimee Milliken - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (5):659-670.
    Since the 1960s, it has been recognized that “medical ethics,” the area of inquiry about the obligations of practitioners of medicine, is inadequate for capturing and addressing the complexities associated with modern medicine, human health, and wellbeing. Subsequently, a new specialty emerged which involved scholars and professionals from a variety of disciplines who had an interest in healthcare ethics. The name adopted is variously biomedical ethics or bioethics. The practice of bioethics in clinical settings is clinical ethics and its primary (...)
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  8.  1
    Everyday Clinical Ethics: Essential Skills and Educational Case Scenarios.Elaine C. Meyer, Giulia Lamiani, Melissa Uveges, Renee McLeod-Sordjan, Christine Mitchell, Robert D. Truog, Jonathan M. Marron, Kerri O. Kennedy, Marilyn Ritholz, Stowe Locke Teti & Aimee B. Milliken - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-23.
    Bioethics conjures images of dramatic healthcare challenges, yet everyday clinical ethics issues unfold regularly. Without sufficient ethical awareness and a relevant working skillset, clinicians can feel ill-equipped to respond to the ethical dimensions of everyday care. Bioethicists were interviewed to identify the essential skills associated with everyday clinical ethics and to identify educational case scenarios to illustrate everyday clinical ethics. Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of bioethicists. Bioethicists were asked: (1) What are the essential skills required (...)
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  9. Advanced Practice Nursing : The Nurse-Patient Relationship and General Ethical Concerns.Aimee Milliken, Eileen Amari-Vaught & Pamela J. Grace - 2018 - In Pamela June Grace & Melissa K. Uveges (eds.), Nursing ethics and professional responsibility in advanced practice. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
     
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  10.  31
    Duty, Distress, and Organ Donation.Aimee Milliken & Anji Wall - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (6):9-10.
    A man of twenty‐two is admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU)after intentionally overdosing on Tylenol. The nurse asks the intensivist on call if someone from the local organ procurement organization should be called in to speak to the family, given a worsening clinical picture and the likelihood that the patient will progress to brain death. The patient's condition is such that multiple organs, including his heart and lungs, could be donated. The intensivist instructs the nurse not to call, as (...)
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  11.  16
    Time to Breathe.Aimee Milliken - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (3):8-9.
    As health care providers, we become all too familiar with suppressing our emotions, putting on a brave face, and going through the necessary motions at the bedside. We power through these emotionally charged scenarios day after day, patient after patient. We try to remain serene, to appear calm, and to exude confidence, competence, and professionalism. We deliver life‐altering news to devastated families; we sit at dying patients’ bedsides and hold their hands as their hearts stop; we deplete ourselves physically and (...)
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