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  1.  19
    Winners, Losers, Insiders, and Outsiders: Comparing Hierometer and Sociometer Theories of Self-Regard.Nikhila Mahadevan, Aiden P. Gregg, Constantine Sedikides & Wendy G. de Waal-Andrews - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  2. “Book Review: Libertarian Quandaries“. [REVIEW]Aiden P. Gregg - 2016 - Libertarian Papers 8:319-327.
    Libertarian Quandaries is a slim volume of tight reasoning that makes a resolute case for libertarianism. Libertarianism is “the social philosophy that identifies individual liberty as the most fundamental social value, and by extension treats moral cooperation as the only morally permissible form of social interaction.” More specifically, the book is a compendium of concise rebuttals to commonplace counterarguments advanced against libertarianism. It attempts to show that libertarianism withstands wide-ranging criticisms in principle, but also that it can be implemented in (...)
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  3.  83
    Dynamics of identity: Between self-enhancement and self-assessment.Aiden P. Gregg, Constantine Sedikides & Jochen E. Gebauer - 2011 - In Seth J. Schwartz, Koen Luyckx & Vivian L. Vignoles (eds.), Handbook of Identity Theory and Research. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 305--327.
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  4.  21
    Is social psychological research really so negatively biased?Aiden P. Gregg & Constantine Sedikides - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):340-341.
    Krueger & Funder (K&F) overstate the defects of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST), and with it the magnitude of negativity bias within social psychology. We argue that replication matters more than NHST, that the pitfalls of NHST are not always or necessarily realized, and that not all biases are harmless offshoots of adaptive mental abilities.
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    Internal mechanisms that implicate the self enlighten the egoism-altruism debate.Constantine Sedikides & Aiden P. Gregg - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):274-275.
    Internal mechanisms, especially those implicating the self, are crucial for the egoism-altruism debate. Self-liking is extended to close others and can be extended, through socialization and reinforcement experiences, to non-close others: Altruistic responses are directed toward others who are included in the self. The process of self-extension can account for cross-situational variability, contextual variability, and individual differences in altruistic behavior.
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