Results for 'Agricultural Economics'

992 found
Order:
  1.  24
    Agricultural Economics.R. P. Duncan-Jones - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (01):116-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  18
    Сredit Agreement in Agriculture: Economic and Legal Analysis.Olena Artemenko, Svitlana Kovalova, Liusia Hbur, Yevhenii Kolomiiets, Oksana Obryvkina & Anna Amelina - 2022 - Postmodern Openings 13 (1):87-102.
    The main purpose of the study is a comprehensive economic and legal analysis of the loan agreement in agriculture in the conditions of formation and development of elements of post-industrial economy in Ukraine. The research methodology is based on a systematic approach using the method of cognition from abstract to concrete and special methods of economic and statistical research, which helped to ensure the reliability of research results and validity of conclusions. It was found that the loan agreement in agriculture (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  30
    Agricultural Economics[REVIEW]R. P. Duncan-Jones - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (1):116-118.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  27
    Assessing agricultural education: Agricultural economics at a crossroads. [REVIEW]E. Wesley F. Peterson, Fred J. Ruppel & Daniel I. Padberg - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):26-33.
    Colleges of agriculture are being forced to adapt to a changing world. The forces behind these changes affect all departments within the college. In this paper, the place of agricultural economics within the college and within the university is identified, the current situation facing the discipline is outlined, and strategies for responding to the forces of change are discussed. Three alternatives are available: continuation, termination, and metamorphosis. Different departments are likely to pursue different strategies. Some may disappear altogether (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  26
    A new modus operandi for the agricultural economics profession.D. Peter Stonehouse - 1997 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (1):55-67.
    Agricultural economics has, until the 1990s, enjoyeda reputation for relevance and usefulness to theagri-food industry and policy-makers. Thatreputation has been jeopardized by a growinginfatuation with models and quantification, and aconcomitant underemphasis placed on many complexproblems and issues of society. An illustrativeexample is explored, using agriculturalactivity-related damage to the natural resourcebase, environment and ecology. Agriculturaleconomists are urged to respond by broadening theirterms of reference and joining forces with otherdisciplines.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  19
    Financial support and freedom of inquiry in agricultural economics.E. C. Pasour - 1988 - Minerva 26 (1):31-52.
  7.  43
    Economic and equity implications of land-use zoning in suburban agriculture.Adesoji Adelaja, Donn Derr & Karen Rose-Tank - 1989 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (2):97-112.
    A cash-flow viability model is used to evaluate the impacts of land-use zoning on farm households in New Jersey. Findings suggest that zoning results in increased production expenses, lower efficiency and profitability, and the devaluation of land assets. Cash flow and economic viability are, thus, reduced. Impacts of zoning on farm incomes, off-farm incomes, revenues from land sales, indebtedness, and farm sizes were not statistically significant. The results suggest that the use of land-use zoning statutes to guarantee the existence of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  21
    Economic, Environmental and Moral Acceptance of Renewable Energy: A Case Study—The Agricultural Biogas Plant at Pěčín.Marek Vochozka, Anna Maroušková & Petr Šuleř - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):299-305.
    The production of renewable energy in agricultural biogas plants is being widely criticized because—among other things—most of the feedstock comes from purpose-grown crops like maize. These activities generate competitive pressure to other crops that are used for feeding or food production, worsening their affordability. Unique pretreatment technology that allows substitution of the purpose-grown crops by farming residues was built 6 years ago on a commercial basis in Pěčín under modest funding and without publicity. The design of the concept; financial (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Multifunctional Agriculture and Regional Economic Growth.Alan Randall - unknown
    It might be conjectured that new models of regional economic development, combined with the emerging understanding of multifunctional agriculture, would suggest a new and perhaps more optimistic perspective on the potential of agriculture as an engine of regional economic growth. My purpose here is begin the process of surveying the relevant literature, unraveling the arguments and gleaning evidence from the published empirical record, and drawing-out some implications that may help focus our deliberations over the next few days.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  26
    Agricultural structure and economic adjustment.E. Wesley & F. Peterson - 1986 - Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):6-15.
    There has been much discussion of changing agricultural structure in the United States. In this paper, the author reviews some of the factors contributing to structural change in the United States and describes the policies adopted by the European Community with respect to agricultural structure. The European experience with structural policies suggests that this approach is not very promising for the United States where no specific structural policies exist. The argument developed in this paper is that structural changes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  5
    The Economic Theory of Agricultural Land Tenure.J. M. Currie - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1981, Dr Currie's main emphasis in this book is on the economic theory of agricultural land tenure, but he also makes extensive reference to the historical development of land tenure in England. After consideration of the history of economic thought on this important topic, he employs an essentially neo-classical approach, though one that pays due attention to the nature of institutional arrangements and particular forms of property rights. In dealing with these latter aspects, he considers not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Sustainable agriculture and freee market economics: Finding common ground in Adam Smith.James Harvey Jr - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his writings are (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  74
    Sustainable agriculture and free market economics: Finding common ground in Adam Smith. [REVIEW]Harvey S. James - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his writings are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  4
    Economic and equity implications of land-use zoning in suburban agriculture.Adesoji Adelaja, Donn Derr & Karen Rose-Tank - 1989 - Journal of Agricultural Ethics 2 (2):97-112.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Agricultural Land Reform in the Philippines: Economic Aspect, University of Philippines, Los Banos.P. R. Sandoval & Benjamin V. Gaon - forthcoming - Laguna.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  23
    Agricultural economists, human capital, and economic development: How colleges of Agriculture can assist. [REVIEW]John J. Waelti - 1990 - Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):95-100.
    Of the requisites for economic development, human capital is the most “policy-proof,” is the one which developed nations can most effectively render on large scale, and is that which American colleges of Agriculture are uniquely equipped to render. Graduate study in agricultural economics is a popular choice of third world students as it occupies a pivotal position between agricultural science and the liberal arts, giving it substantial relevance to economic development. It is necessary to understand the history, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  3
    Agriculture and Economic Development.Erik Thorbecke - 1980 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 47.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  29
    The Economics of Agriculture Volume 1: Selected Papers of E. Gale Johnson edited by J. M Antle and D. A. Sumner. [REVIEW]Amitrajeet A. Batabyal - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):93-94.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  14
    How to include socio-economic considerations in decision-making on agricultural biotechnology? Two models from Kenya and South Africa.Koen Beumer - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4):669-684.
    This article contributes to the debate about how regulatory science for agricultural technologies can be ‘opened up’ for a more diverse set of concerns and knowledges. The article focuses on the regulation of ‘socio-economic considerations’ for genetically modified organisms. While numerous countries have declared their intent to include these considerations in biotechnology decision-making, it is currently unclear both what counts as a socio-economic consideration and how such considerations should be assessed. This article provides greater clarity about how socio-economic considerations (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  25
    Agricultural Big Data Analytics and the Ethics of Power.Mark Ryan - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):49-69.
    Agricultural Big Data analytics (ABDA) is being proposed to ensure better farming practices, decision-making, and a sustainable future for humankind. However, the use and adoption of these technologies may bring about potentially undesirable consequences, such as exercises of power. This paper will analyse Brey’s five distinctions of power relationships (manipulative, seductive, leadership, coercive, and forceful power) and apply them to the use agricultural Big Data. It will be shown that ABDA can be used as a form of manipulative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  33
    Urban agriculture and the prospects for deep democracy.David W. McIvor & James Hale - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (4):727-741.
    The interest in and enthusiasm for urban agriculture (UA) in urban communities, the non-profit sector, and governmental institutions has grown exponentially over the past decade. Part of the appeal of UA is its potential to improve the civic health of a community, advancing what some call food democracy. Yet despite the increasing presence of the language of civic agriculture or food democracy, UA organizations and practitioners often still focus on practical, shorter-term projects in an effort both to increase local involvement (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22.  6
    The Economics of Agriculture Volume 1: Selected Papers of E. Gale Johnson edited by J. M Antle and D. A. Sumner. [REVIEW]John M. Antle, D. A. Sumner & Amitrajeet A. Batabyal - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):93-94.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Against Inefficacy Objections: The Real Economic Impact of Individual Consumer Choices on Animal Agriculture.Steven McMullen & Matthew C. Halteman - 2018 - Food Ethics 1 (4):online first.
    When consumers choose to abstain from purchasing meat, they face some uncertainty about whether their decisions will have an impact on the number of animals raised and killed. Consequentialists have argued that this uncertainty should not dissuade consumers from a vegetarian diet because the “expected” impact, or average impact, will be predictable. Recently, however, critics have argued that the expected marginal impact of a consumer change is likely to be much smaller or more radically unpredictable than previously thought. This objection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  25
    Regenerative agriculture and a more-than-human ethic of care: a relational approach to understanding transformation.Madison Seymour & Sean Connelly - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (1):231-244.
    A growing body of literature argues that achieving radical change in the agri-food system requires a radical renegotiation of our relationship with the environment alongside a change in our thinking and approach to transformational food politics. This paper argues that relational approaches such as a more-than-human ethic of care (MTH EoC) can offer a different and constructive perspective to analyse agri-food system transformation because it emphasises social structures and relationships as the basis of environmental change. A MTH EoC has not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. The Socio-Economic Impact of Biotechnology on Agriculture in the Third World.Hope Shand - forthcoming - Symposium “Agricultural Bioethics,” Iowa State University.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  12
    Prison agriculture in the United States: racial capitalism and the disciplinary matrix of exploitation and rehabilitation.Carrie Chennault & Joshua Sbicca - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-17.
    The United States prison system, the largest in the world, operates through both exploitative and rehabilitative modes of discipline. To gain political and public support for the extensive resources expended housing, feeding, and controlling its incarcerated population, the carceral state strategically emphasizes a mix of each mode. Agriculture in prisons is particularly illustrative. With roots in racial capitalism and the carceral state’s criminalization of poverty, plantation convict leasing system, work reform efforts, and punitive and welfarist carceral logics, prison agriculture embodies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  90
    Pushing the boundaries of indigeneity and agricultural knowledge: Oaxacan immigrant gardening in California.Laura-Anne Minkoff-Zern - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):381-392.
    This article explores a community garden in the Northern Central Coast of California, founded and cultivated by Triqui and Mixteco peoples native to Oaxaca, Mexico. The practices depicted in this case study contrast with common agroecological discourses, which assume native people’s agricultural techniques are consistently static and place-based. Rather than choose cultivation techniques based on an abstract notion of indigenous tradition, participants utilize the most appropriate practices for their new environment. Garden participants combine agricultural practices developed in Oaxaca (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  37
    Expressing values in agricultural markets: An economic policy perspective. [REVIEW]David S. Conner - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):27-35.
    Many mechanisms now exist forconsumers to express progressive values inpurchasing decisions. Although demand for suchgoods has grown, these goods remain the purviewof small niche markets. Focusing on the marketfor agricultural goods (and the choice betweenthe paradigms of industrialized versussustainable agriculture), this paper discussesthree major reasons (market failures, entrybarriers, and biased policies) why it isdifficult for consumers to express their valuesfor a more sustainable system in this way, andwhy policy change is needed to create a fairerplaying field. The current policy, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  10
    Digesting agriculture development: nutrition-oriented development and the political ecology of rice–body relations in India.Carly E. Nichols - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):757-771.
    Nutrition-sensitive agriculture has emerged as a major development paradigm that works to diversify crops and diets throughout the Global South in order to improve nutritional outcomes. Drawing on a conceptual framework from political ecologies of health that looks at political economic factors, social discourse, and embodied, material experiences of food, I analyze qualitative and ethnographic data from an integrated NSA intervention in Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand, India. The analysis shows that while embodied experiences of differing rice varieties were central to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  21
    Agricultural Innovation and the Role of Institutions: Lessons from the Game of Drones.Per Frankelius, Charlotte Norrman & Knut Johansen - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):681-707.
    In 2015, observers argued that the fourth agricultural revolution had been initiated. This article focuses on one part of this high-tech revolution: the origin, development, applications, and user value of unmanned aerial systems (UAS). Institutional changes connected to the UAS innovation are analyzed, based on a Swedish case study. The methods included autoethnography. The theoretical frame was composed by four perspectives: innovation, institutions, sustainability, and ethics. UAS can help farmers cut costs and produce higher quantity with better quality, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  8
    Agricultural Innovation and the Role of Institutions: Lessons from the Game of Drones.Per Frankelius, Charlotte Norrman & Knut Johansen - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):681-707.
    In 2015, observers argued that the fourth agricultural revolution had been initiated. This article focuses on one part of this high-tech revolution: the origin, development, applications, and user value of unmanned aerial systems. Institutional changes connected to the UAS innovation are analyzed, based on a Swedish case study. The methods included autoethnography. The theoretical frame was composed by four perspectives: innovation, institutions, sustainability, and ethics. UAS can help farmers cut costs and produce higher quantity with better quality, and also (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  24
    Food justice, intersectional agriculture, and the triple food movement.Bobby J. Smith - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4):825-835.
    Emerging as an intersectional response to social inequalities perpetuated by the mainstream food movement in the United States, the food justice movement is being used by marginalized communities to address their food needs. This movement relies on an emancipatory discourse, illustrated by what I term intersectional agriculture. In many respects, the mainstream food movement reflects contention between marketization (corporate agriculture) and social protectionist (local food) discourses, while the role of food justice remains somewhat unclear as it relates to the mainstream (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  33.  5
    Agriculture and environment: friends or foes? Conceptualising agri-environmental discourses under the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy.Ilona Rac, Karmen Erjavec & Emil Erjavec - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 41 (1):147-166.
    The European Union’s common agricultural policy (CAP), in addition to its primary production and farm income goals, is a large source of funding for environmentally friendly agricultural practices. However, its schemes have variable success and uptake across member states (MS) and regions. This study tries to explain these differences by demonstrating differences between policy levels in the understanding of the relationship between nature and farming. To compare constructs and values of the respective policy communities, their discursive construction as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  17
    The economic of agricultural land tenure: J.M. Currie , vii + 194., £15. [REVIEW]Michael Havinden - 1983 - History of European Ideas 4 (4):475-476.
  35.  22
    The restructuring of the agricultural and food system: Social and economic equity in the reshaping of the Agrarian Question and the Food Question. [REVIEW]Alessandro Bonanno - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (4):72-82.
    The paper investigates the characteristics of the global restructuring of the agricultural and food system that has occurred in recent years. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the “Food and Natural Resource Question” and its relation to the “Agrarian Question.” It is argued that rather than being separate issues, these are two aspects of a unified process occurring at the global level. Moreover, it is argued that the transnational unity of the agrarian question and the food question mandates (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  18
    Rethinking gender mainstreaming in agricultural innovation policy in Nepal: a critical gender analysis.Rachana Devkota, Laxmi Prasad Pant, Helen Hambly Odame, Bimala Rai Paudyal & Kelly Bronson - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1373-1390.
    Gender mainstreaming has been prioritised within the national agricultural policies of many countries, including Nepal. Yet gender mainstreaming at the national policy level does not always work to effect change when policies are implemented at the local scale. In less-developed nations such as Nepal, it is rare to find a critical analysis of the mainstreaming process and its successes or failures. This paper employs a critical gender analysis approach to examine the gender mainstreaming efforts in Nepal as they move (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  6
    Negotiating agricultural change in the Midwestern US: seeking compatibility between farmer narratives of efficiency and legacy.Nathan J. Shipley, William P. Stewart & Carena J. van Riper - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (4):1465-1476.
    AbstractAgroecosystems in the Midwestern United States are undergoing changes that pressure farmers to adapt their farming practices. Because farmers decide what practices to implement on their land, there are needs to understand how they adapt to competing demands of changes in global markets, technology, farm sizes, and decreasing rural populations. Increased understanding of farmer decision-making can also inform agricultural policy in ways that encourage farmer adoption of sustainable practices. In this research we adopt a grounded view of farmers by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  6
    The economics of science: a critical realist overview.David Tyfield - 2012 - New York: Routledge.
    Introduction -- The commercialisation of science and the construction of the knowledge-based bio-economy -- The KBBE reality--the case of agriculture -- Intellectual property rights and the global commodification of knowledge -- Privatizing Chinese science : national development vs. neoliberal financialization -- Critical realism and the importance of ontological attention -- Critical realism and beyond in economics -- The realist transcendental argument.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39.  17
    Agriculture and human values at 40 years: reflections on its scale and scope.Harvey S. James - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (1):25-30.
    Since its origins as an academic newsletter, _Agriculture and Human Values_ has evolved to be one of the leading journals publishing critical scholarship of the food and agricultural system. This essay illustrates and comments on the evolution of the scale and scope of research published in the journal over the years.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  11
    Searching for the plot: narrative self-making and urban agriculture during the economic crisis in Slovenia.Petra Matijevic - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):301-314.
    Analyses of household urban agriculture have demonstrated a wealth of personal, economic, social, moral or political uses for self-provisioned food, yet have often understood the practice itself as merely a production process. This ‘means-to-an-end’ perspective is especially pronounced in studies of locations undergoing economic hardship. Urban gardening in postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union has been framed as an element of an informal economy, enabling household savings, access to informal networks and avoidance of industrial goods deemed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  6
    Framing of sustainable agricultural practices by the farming press and its effect on adoption.Niki A. Rust, Rebecca M. Jarvis, Mark S. Reed & Julia Cooper - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):753-765.
    There is growing political pressure for farmers to use more sustainable agricultural practices to protect people and the planet. The farming press could encourage farmers to adopt sustainable practices through its ability to manipulate discourse and spread awareness by changing the salience of issues or framing topics in specific ways. We sought to understand how the UK farming press framed sustainable agricultural practices and how the salience of these practices changed over time. We combined a media content analysis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  9
    Adoption of smart farm networks: a translational process to inform digital agricultural technologies.Barituka Bekee, Michelle S. Segovia & Corinne Valdivia - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-18.
    Due to natural phenomena like global warming and climate change, agricultural production is increasingly faced with threats that transcend farm boundaries. Management practices at the landscape or community level are often required to adequately respond to these new challenges (e.g., pest migration). Such decision-making at a community or beyond-farm level—i.e., practices that are jointly developed by farmers within a community—can be aided by computing and communications technology. In this study, we employ a translational research process to examine the social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  42
    Against Inefficacy Objections: the Real Economic Impact of Individual Consumer Choices on Animal Agriculture.Matthew C. Halteman & Steven McMullen - 2019 - Food Ethics 2 (2-3):93-110.
    When consumers choose to abstain from purchasing meat, they face some uncertainty about whether their decisions will have an impact on the number of animals raised and killed. Consequentialists have argued that this uncertainty should not dissuade consumers from a vegetarian diet because the “expected” impact, or average impact, will be predictable. Recently, however, critics have argued that the expected marginal impact of a consumer change is likely to be much smaller or more radically unpredictable than previously thought. This objection (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44. Fair agricultural innovation for a changing climate.Zoë Robaey & Cristian Timmermann - 2018 - In Erinn Gilson & Sarah Kenehan (eds.), Food, Environment and Climate Change. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 213-230.
    Agricultural innovation happens at different scales and through different streams. In the absence of a common global research agenda, decisions on which innovations are brought to existence, and through which methods, are taken with insufficient view on how innovation affects social relations, the environment, and future food production. Mostly, innovations are considered from the standpoint of economic efficiency, particularly in relationship to creating jobs for technology-exporting countries. Increasingly, however, the realization that innovations cannot be successful on their technical prowess (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  23
    Operationalizing evil: Christian realism, liberal economics, and industrial agriculture. [REVIEW]Leland Glenna - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (3):205-216.
    The Enlightenment marked a shift inmoral debates away from notions of sin and eviltoward the more secular concept of virtue basedin reason. Perhaps the most notable example ofsuch liberal thought can be found in JohnDewey's 1934 A Common Faith, where he arguesthat people should set aside bickering overreligious differences and work in a utilitarianspirit to achieve public good through science.Hitler's Germany, Stalin's Soviet Union, theChinese cultural revolution, and the Cold War'sthreat of mutually assured destruction haveinspired philosophers and theologians to revivethe (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  41
    Civic agriculture and community engagement.Brian K. Obach & Kathleen Tobin - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):307-322.
    Several scholars have claimed that small-scale agriculture in which farmers sell goods to the local market has the potential to strengthen social ties and a sense of community, a phenomenon referred to as “civic agriculture.” Proponents see promise in the increase in the number of community supported agriculture programs, farmers markets, and other locally orientated distribution systems as well as the growing interest among consumers for buying locally produced goods. Yet others have suggested that these novel or reborn distribution mechanisms (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47.  21
    Community shared agriculture.Paul Fieldhouse - 1996 - Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):43-47.
    Community shared agriculture is a concept that brings food producers and consumers together in a relationship that supports values associated with sustainable agriculture, community development, and food security. At the heart of the concept is the notion of sharing. Participants share the real costs of food production through fair prices for the farmer and by assuming part of the risk of poor harvests. They also share the rewards that come through a seasons supply of fresh produce, the development of fellowship, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  5
    Agricultural Enlightenment: Knowledge, Technology, and Nature, 1750-1840.Peter M. Jones - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Agricultural Enlightenment explores the economic underpinnings of the Enlightenment to argue the case that the expansion of the so-called knowledge economy in the second half of the eighteenth century powerfully influenced governments and all those who worked in agriculture, or who sought to derive profit from the productive use of the land.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  22
    Potential Cuban agricultural export profile under open trade between the U. S. and Cuba.Jose Alvarez & William A. Messina - 1993 - Agriculture and Human Values 10 (3):61-74.
    The sweeping changes that have taken place in the Eastern European countries and the former Soviet Union have detrimentally impacted an already weak Cuban economy. The establishment of the Special Period (1990-) embodies increasing austerity, especially in the inputs market. Recent economic liberalization policies in Cuba may lead to a more market-oriented economy, the lifting of the U. S. embargo, and commercial relations between the two countries. There is concern on the potential impact that resumption of trade may have on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  23
    The crisis of Portugese agriculture in relation to the EEC challenge.Manuel Belo Moreira - 1989 - Agriculture and Human Values 6 (1-2):70-81.
    The paper investigates the crisis of Portugese agriculture and the challenges connected with Portugal's integration into the European Economic Community (EEC). An historical overview of the economic and social development of the agricultural sector since the 1950s is provided. Additionally, a discussion of the principal differences between the Portugese agricultural crisis and that of other advanced European countries and the U.S. is carried out. In this portion of the paper it is argued that agriculture in Portugal is characterized (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 992