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Abu Shiraz Rahaman [4]Abu S. Rahaman [2]
  1.  40
    The Global Fight Against Corruption: A Foucaultian, Virtues-Ethics Framing.Jeff Everett, Dean Neu & Abu Shiraz Rahaman - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (1):1-12.
    This paper extends the discussion of business ethics by examining the issue of corruption, its definition, the solutions being proposed for dealing with it, and the ethical perspectives underpinning these proposals. The paper’s findings are based on a review of association, think-tank, and academic reports, books, and papers dealing with the topic of corruption, as well as the pronouncements, websites, and position papers of a number of important global organizations active in the fight. These organizations include the World Bank, the (...)
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  2.  8
    We Have Never Been Secular: Religious Identities, Duties, and Ethics in Audit Practice.Jeff Everett, Constance Friesen, Dean Neu & Abu Shiraz Rahaman - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):1121-1142.
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  3.  2
    Correction: Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (1):33-33.
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  4.  13
    Trust, Morality, and the Privatization of Water Services in Developing Countries.Abu Shiraz Rahaman, Jeff Everett & Dean Neu - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (4):539-575.
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  5.  2
    Social Accountability, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Protests.Dean Neu, Gregory D. Saxton & Abu S. Rahaman - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (1):17-31.
    This study examines the 3.5 m+ English-language original tweets that occurred during the 2011 Occupy Wall Street protests. Starting from previous research, we analyze how character terms such as “the banker,” “politician,” “the teaparty,” “GOP,” and “the corporation,” as well as concept terms such as “ethics,” “fairness,” “morals,” “justice,” and “democracy” were used by individual participants to respond to the Occupy Wall Street events. These character and concept terms not only allowed individuals to take an ethical stance but also accumulated (...)
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