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  1.  33
    Sexual Coercion and Forced in-Pair Copulation as Sperm Competition Tactics in Humans.Aaron T. Goetz & Todd K. Shackelford - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (3):265-282.
    Rape of women by men might be generated either by a specialized rape adaptation or as a by-product of other psychological adaptations. Although increasing number of sexual partners is a proposed benefit of rape according to the “rape as an adaptation” and the “rape as a by-product” hypotheses, neither hypothesis addresses directly why some men rape their long-term partners, to whom they already have sexual access. In two studies we tested specific hypotheses derived from the general hypothesis that sexual coercion (...)
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  2.  13
    The Implicit Rules of Combat.Gorge A. Romero, Michael N. Pham & Aaron T. Goetz - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):496-516.
  3.  26
    Mate Guarding and Frequent in-Pair Copulation in Humans.Todd K. Shackelford, Aaron T. Goetz, Faith E. Guta & David P. Schmitt - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (3):239-252.
    Cuckoldry is an adaptive problem faced by parentally investing males of socially monogamous species (e.g., humans and many avian species). Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation (IPC) may have evolved as anti-cuckoldry tactics in avian species and in humans. In some avian species, the tactics are used concurrently, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated positively. In other avian species, the tactics are compensatory, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated (...)
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  4.  48
    Sperm Competition Theory Offers Additional Insight Into Cultural Variation in Sexual Behavior.Aaron T. Goetz & Todd K. Shackelford - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):285-286.
    Schmitt recognized that research is needed to identify other factors associated with sex ratio and with sociosexuality that may explain cross-cultural variation in sexual behavior. One such factor may be the risk of sperm competition. Sperm competition theory may lead us to a more complete explanation of cultural variation in sexual behavior.
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