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  1.  70
    Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation: A Stimulating Idea Whose Time Has Not Yet Come.Aaron Spital - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):107-112.
    Transplantation is now the best therapy for eligible patients with end-stage organ disease. For patients with failed kidneys, successful renal transplantation improves the quality and increases the quantity of their lives. For people with other types of organ failure, transplantation offers the only hope for long-term survival. a.
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  2.  47
    Donor Benefit Is the Key to Justified Living Organ Donation.Aaron Spital - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (1):105-109.
    Spurred by a severe shortage of cadaveric organs, there has been a marked growth in living organ donation over the past several years. This has stimulated renewed interest in the ethics of this practice. The major concern has always been the possibility that a physician may seriously harm one person while trying to improve the well-being of another. As Carl Elliott points out, this puts the donor's physician in a difficult predicament: when evaluating a person who volunteers to donate an (...)
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  3.  78
    Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation: Neglected Again.Aaron Spital - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):169-174.
    : The March 2003 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal was devoted to cadaveric organ procurement. All the discussed proposals for solving the severe organ shortage place a higher value on respecting individual and/or family autonomy than on maximizing recovery of organs. Because of this emphasis on autonomy and historically high refusal rates, I believe that none of the proposals is likely to achieve the goal of ensuring an adequate supply of transplantable organs. An alternative approach, conscription of (...)
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  4.  50
    In Defense of Routine Recovery of Cadaveric Organs: A Response to Walter Glannon.Aaron Spital & James S. Taylor - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):337-343.
    Walter Glannon argues that our proposal for routine recovery of transplantable cadaveric organs is unacceptable After carefully reviewing his counterarguments, we conclude that, although some of them have merit, none are sufficiently strong to warrant abandoning this plan. Below we respond to each of Glannon's concerns.
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  5.  20
    Intrafamilial Organ Donation Is Often an Altruistic Act.Aaron Spital - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):116-118.
    In their recent article, Glannon and Ross remind us that family members have obligations to help each other that strangers do not have. They argue, I believe correctly, that what creates moral obligations within families is not genetic relationship but rather a sharing of intimacy. For no one are these obligations stronger than they are for parents of young children. This observation leads the authors to the logical conclusion that organ donation by a parent to her child is not optional (...)
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  6. Ethical Issues in Living Related Donors.Aaron Spital - 2001 - Advances in Bioethics 7:89-123.
     
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  7.  35
    Response to “Intrafamilial Organ Donation Is Often an Altruistic Act” by Aaron Spital and “Donor Benefit Is the Key to Justified Living Organ Donation,” by Aaron Spital : Reply to Glannon and Ross. [REVIEW]Aaron Spital - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):195-198.
    According to Glannon and Ross, for an act to be considered altruistic, it cannot be obligatory nor motivated by expectation of self-reward. Given that parents are obligated to help their children and stand to benefit greatly from donating, the authors conclude that parent to child organ donation is not altruistic. Are they correct? I am not sure. In my view, this is a semantic question and the answer depends upon how one defines altruism. Altruism is a complex subject that means (...)
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  8.  16
    ""Response to" Do Genetic Relationships Create Moral Obligations in Organ Transplantation?" by Walter Glannon and Lainie Friedman Ross (CQ Vol 11, No 2) Intrafamilial Organ Donation Is Often an Altruistic Act. [REVIEW]Aaron Spital - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):116-118.
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